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Full text of "News notes of California libraries"

California State Library 



N ews Notes 



OF 



Californ i a Libraries 



VOL 17 

NOS. 1-4 

JANUARY-OCTOBER, 1922 



CALIFORNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 

FRANK J. SMITH, Superintendent 

SACRAMENTO, 1923 



25391 



(Index Supplement.) 



Vol.17, No. 1 JANUARY 1922 



News Notes 



OF 



California Libraries 



IN THIS NUMBER— SOME OF THE ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



PALO ALTO PUBLIC LI BRARY— SUCCESSFUL BOND ISSUE. 

STOCKTON PUBLIC LIBRARY— "WALKING BOOK FROM BROBD1NGNAG. 

INYO COUNTY FREE LIBRARY— GAME BREAKFAST IN 
BISHOP BRANCH. 

POMONA PUBLIC LI BRARY— ANNUAL DOLL PARTY. 

KERN COUNTY FREE LIBRARY— SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN OF 
MIGRATORY LABORERS. 

NEW BRANCH BUI LDINGS— PASADENA PUBLIC LIBRARY, 
TULARE COUNTY FREE LIBRARY. 

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, see Contents. 



California State Library 



16230 



CALIFOBNIA STATE PBINTING OFFICE 
SACBAMENTO. 1922 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
WALKING BOOK FROM BROBDINGNAG 1, 74 

THE FLOWERS OF SHAKESPEARE 3 

STANDARDIZATION OF THE LIBRARY PROFESSION 13 

CERTIFICATION OF LIBRARIANS IN OTHER STATES 17 

CERTIFICATION FROM THE LIBRARY ASSISTANT'S POINT OF 
VIEW , 21 

SUMMARY OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS IN THE UNITED 
STATES _- 26 

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES , 42 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 43 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS 44 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 
GENERAL INTEREST 86 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 93 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 95 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY _ 97 

Staff, Etc 97 

Departments 98 

Recent Accessions 103 

California State Publications Received Dubinq October, November 

and December, 1921 i . 137 

California City Publications Received During October, November 

and December, 1921 141 

Books fop. the Blind Added During October, November and December, 

1921 141 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the California 
State Library. 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, Sac- 
ramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-class matter December, 1913, at the post office at Sacramento, 
California, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 




16230 



WALKING BOOK FROM BROBDINGNAG. 

See Stockton Public Library, p. 74. 



THE FLOWERS OF SHAKESPEARE. 

By Mrs Frances Burns Linn, Librarian, Santa Barbara County Free Library. 

The Santa Barbara Library's recognition and celebration of the Shakespeare 
tercentenary was a display of good editions of the works of Shakespeare, an exhibit 
of a valuable collection of the John Boydell engravings, 1803, and the assembling 
with appropriate quotation of all herbs and blossoms mentioned in Shakespeare's 
works which were available in Santa Barbara gardens. So much pleasure was 
expressed in the flower exhibit that it has become our custom every April and the 
comments each year prove that a renewed acquaintance with Shakespeare, or the 
introduction to Shakespeare which comes from familiarity with his references to 
trees and plants, is useful, pleasing and varied. The quotations are keynotes to far 
more : they bring to mind the poetry of the allusion and show the purpose and 
significance of the terms. 

Shakespeare is preeminently the poet of nature. In profusion of references to 
trees and plants he is surpassed only by Old Testament writers, but "few or many, 
it is not so much after all, what plants does he name as after what fashion does 
he name them." Sometimes they are cited as objects of simple beauty — "When 
daisies pied." Sometimes they are descriptive adjectives — "her lily hand." Still 
more frequently they supply striking comparisons — 

"Kate, like the hazel 
Is straight and slender and as brown in hue 
As hazel nuts and sweeter than the kernels." 

Taming of the Shrew, ii, 1, 255. 

These are the emineatly poetical allusions. Nearly a hundred others are used in 
an ordinary, conventional or prosaic way. Of edible vegetables about thirty are 
mentioned and usually for some facetious or jocular use ; of fruits native and foreign, 
the same number ; of spices and medicines, about twenty. Often the references 
to plants have historical interest — 

"But why wear you your leek today? Saint Davy's day is past." 

Henry V, v, 3 , _2 ; 
or are identified with some quaint superstition — 

"We have the receipt of fern-seed, we walk invisible." 

1 Henry IV, ii, 1 94. 

Mr Buskin says that the quietude of Shakespeare's early intercourse with nature 
contributed in no slight measure to the perfection of mental power disclosed sd 
marvelously at a riper age and which the word "Shakesperean" is sufficient to 
denote. 

We have used L. H. Grindon's "The Shakspere Flora" as our botanical authority 
and from a great wealth of references have chosen only one illustrating quotation. 

Aconite (Monk's Hood). 
King : Though it do work as strong 

As aconitum. 

2 Henry IV, iv, 4, 47. 

Acorn. 
Celia : I found him under a tree, like a dropped acorn. 

Kosalind : It may well be called Jove's tree, when 

it drops forth such fruit. 

As You Like It, iii, 2, 24S. 

Almond. 
Thersites : The parrot will not do more for an almond. 

Troilus and Cressida, v, 2, 194. 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



Sebastian : 
Antonio : 

Titania : 
Marcus : 



Anemone. 
By this the boy, that by her side lay kill'd, 
Was melted like a vapour from her sight ; 
And in his blood, that on the ground lay spill'd, 
A purple flower sprung up, chequer*d with white, 
Resembling well his pale cheeks, and the blood 
Which in round drops upon their whiteness stood. 

Venus and Adonis, 1165. 
Apple. 
I think he will carry this island home in 
his pocket and give it his son for an apple. 
And, sowing the kernels of it in the sea, 
bring forth more islands. 

Tempest, ii, 1, 90. 
Apricock. 
Feed him with apricccks and dewberries. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, iii, 1, 169. 

Aspen. 
Tremble, like aspen-leaves. 



Titus Andronicus, ii, 4, 45. 

Bachelor's Button (Ranunculus Aconitifolius). 
Host : He capers, he dances, he has eyes of youth, he 

wi'ites verses, he speaks holiday, he smells 
April and May : he will carry't, he will carry't ; 
'tis in his buttons, he will carry't. 

Merry Wives of Windsor, iii, 2, 71. 

Balm. 

Cleopatra : As sweet as balm, as soft as air, as gentle, — 

Antony and Cleopatra, v, 2, 314. 

Balsam. 
Alcibiades : Is this the balsam that the usuving senate 

Pours into captains' wounds? Banishment! 

Timon of Athens, iii, 4, 110. 

Bay. 

Captain : 'Tis thought the king is dead ; we will not stay. 

The bay-trees in our country are all withered. 

Richard II, ii, 4, 7. 
Birch. 
Duke : Now, as fond fathers, 

Having bound up the threatening twigs of birch, 
Only to stick it in their children's sight 
For terror, not to use, in time the rod 
Becomes more mock'd than fear'd. 

Measure for Measure, i, 3, 24. 

Blackberry. 
Falstaff : If reasons were as 

plentiful as blackberries. I would give no man 
a reason upon compulsion, I. 

1 Henry IV, ii, 4, 2G5. 
Blood-root. 
Friar Laurence : Within the infant rind of this small flower, 
Poison hath residence, and medicine power : 
For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part ; 
Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart. 

Romeo and Juliet, ii, 3, 23. 



Maria : 



Box. 

Get ye all three into the box-tree : Malvolio's 
coming down this walk : he has been yonder i' the 
sun practising behaviour to his own shadow this 
half hour : observe him, for the love of mockery ; 
for I know this letter will make a contemplative 
idiot of him. Close, in the name of jesting ! 
Lie thou there ; for here come the trout that 
must be caught with tickling. 

Twelfth Night, ii, 



5, IS. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



THE FLOWERS OF SHAKESPEARE. 



First Keeper 



Rosalind 



Iris 



Rosalind : 
Celia : 



Rosalind : 



Falstaff : 



Perdita : 



Evans : 
Quickly : 
Evans : 

William 

Evans : 
Quickly : 



Celia : 



Brake. 
Under this thick-grown brake 
we'll shroud ourselves. 

3 Henry VI, iii, 1, 1. 

Bramble. 
There is a man haunts 
the forest, that abuses our young plants with 
carving 'Rosalind' on their barks ; hangs odes 
upon hawthorns and elegies on brambles. 

As You Like It, iii, 2, 376. 

Broom. 

The broom-groves, 
Whose shadow the dismissed bachelor loves. 

Tempest, iv, 1, 66. 

Burdock. 
O, how full of briers is this working-day world ! 
They are but burs, cousin, thrown upon thee in 
holiday foolery : if we walk not in the trodden 
paths, our very petticoats will catch them. 
I could shake them off my coat : these burs are in my heart. 

As You Like It, i, 3, 12. 

Burnet, see Clover. 

Buttercup ( Cuckoo-bud ) . 

Camomile. 
For though the camomile, the more it is 
trodden on, the faster it grows, yet youth, the 
more it is wasted the sooner it wears. 

1 Henry IV, ii, 4, 441. 

Carnation (Dianthus Caryophyllus). 
The fairest flowers o' the season 
Are our carnations and streak'd gillvvors. 

Winter's Tale, iv, 4, 81. 

Carob (Locust). 

Carrot. 
I pray you, have your remembrance, 
child ; accusativo, hun, hang, hog. 
'Hang-hog' is Latin for bacon, I 
warrant you. 

Leave your prabbles, 'ornan. What 
is the focative case, William? 
O, -vocativo, O. 

Remember, William ; focative is caret. 
And that's a good root. 

Merry Wives of Windsor, iv, 1, 48. 

Cedar. 
The lesser thing should not the greater hide ; 
The cedar stoops not to the base shrub's foot, 
But low shrubs wither at the cedar's root. 

Rape of Lucrece, 663. 

Cherry. 
When he beheld his shadow in the brook, 
The fishes spread on it their golden gills ; 
When he was by, the birds such pleasure took, 
That some would sing, some other in their bills 
Would bring him mulberries and ripe-red cherries ; 
He fed them with his sight, they him With berries. 

Venus and Adonis, 1099. 

Chestnut. 
An excellent colour : your chestnut was 
ever the only colour. 

As You Like It, iii, 4, 12. 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



Burgundy 



Biron : 



Ophelia 



Fairy 



Menenius 



Queen 



Suffolk : 



Perdita : 



Antonio : 
Sebastian : 



Clover, 
The even mead, that erst brought sweetly forth 
The freckled cowslip, burnet and green clover. 

Henry V, v, 2, 48. 
Cockle. 
Sow'd cockle reap'd no corn ; 
And justice always whirls in equal measure. 

Love's Labour's Lost, iv, 3, 402. 

Columbine. 
There's fennel for you, and columbines : 
there's rue for you. and here's some for me : 
we may call it herb-grace o' Sundays.: O, you 
must wear your rue with a difference. There's 
a daisy : I would give you some violets, but 
they withered all when my father died. 

Hamlet, iv, 5, 180. 

Corn, see Cockle. 

Cowslip. 

The cowslips tall her pensioners be ; 
In their gold coats spots you see : 
Those be rubies, fairy favours ; 
In those freckles live their savours. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, ii, 1, 10. 

Crab-tree. 

Welcome. 
A curse begin at very root on's heart, 
That is not glad to see thee ! You are three 
That Rome should dote on : yet, by the faith of men, 
But our cold maids do dead men's fingers call them. 
Be grafted to your relish. 

Coriolanus, ii, 1, 201. 

Crow-flower. 
There with fantastic garlands did she come 
Of crow-flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples, 
That liberal sheperds give a grosser name, 
But our cold maids dc dead men's fingers call them. 

Hamlet, iv, 7, 170. 

Crown Imperial, see Flower-de-luce. 

Cuckoo-bud (Buttercup). 
When daisies pied, and violets blue, 
And lady-smocks all silver white, 
And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue, 
Do paint the meadows with delight. 

Love's Labour's Lost, v, 2, 904. 

Cypress. 
Their sweetest shade a grove of cvpress trees ! 

2 Henry VI, iii, 2, 324. 

Daffodil. 

Daffodils 
That come before the swallow dares, and take 
The winds of March with beauty. 

Winter's Tale, iv, 4, 118. 

Daisy, see Cuckoo-bud. 

Darnel, see Llemlock. 

Dewberry, see Apricock. 

Dian's Bud (Wormwood). 

Dock. 
Held sow it with nettle-seed. 
Or docks, or mallows. 

Tempest, ii, 1, 144. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



THE FLOWERS OF SHAKESPEARE. 



Arviragus 



Saturninus 



Titania 



Sir Toby 



Perdita 



Gonzalo 



Polixenes 



Falstaff : 



King 



Petruchio : 



Eglantine. 

Thou shalt not lack 
The flower that's like thy face, pale primrose, nor 
The azured harebell, like thy veins, no, nor 
The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, 
Ont-sweeten'd not thy breath. 

Cymbeline, iv, 2, 221. 

Elder. 
And this the elder-tree. 

Titus Andronicus, ii, 3, 277. 

Elm. 
Ivy so enrings the barky fingers of the elm. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, iv, 1, 48. 

Fennel, see Columbine. 

Flax. 

Excellent : it hangs like flax on a distaff. 

Twelfth Night, i, 3, 10S. 

Flower-de-luce. 

Bold oxlips and 
The crown imperial ; lilies of all kinds. 
The flower-de-luce being one ! 0, these I lack 
To make vou garlands of. 

Winter's Tale, iv, 4, 125. 

Fumitory, see Hemlock. 

* Furze. 

Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea 
for an acre of barren ground, long heath, 
brown furze, nny thing. The wills above be 
done ! but I would fain die a dry death. 

Tempest, i, 1, 70. 

Gilliflower. 
Then make your garden rich in gillvvors. 

Winter's Tale, iv, 4, 97. 

Gooseberry. 

Virtue is of so little regard in these 
costermonger times that true valor is 
turned bear-herd ... all the other gifts 
appertinent to man, as the malice of this 
age shapes them, are not worth a gooseberry. 

2 Henry IV, i, 2, -190. 

Grape. 

With thy grapes our hairs be crown'd. 

Antony and Cleopatra, ii, 7, 123. 

Harebell (Scilla Nutans), see Eglantine. 
Hawthorn. 
Ah, what a life were this ! how sweet ! how lovely ! 
Gives not the hawthorn-bush a sweeter shade 
To shepherds looking on their silly sheep, 
Than cloth a rich embroider'd canopy 
To kings that fear their subjects' treachery? 
O, yes, it doth ; a thousand-fold it doth. 

3 Henry VI. ii, 5, 41. 

Hazel. 

Kate like the hazel-twig 
Is straight and slender and as brown in hue 
As hazel nuts and sweeter than the kernels. 

Taming of the Shrew, ii, 1, 255. 



news notes op califoenia librabies. ' [January, 1922 



Cordelia 



Amiens : 



Hero 



Ulysses 



Lysander : 



Clarence : 



Perdita 



Fluellen : 



Heath, see Furze. 

Hemlock. 

He was met even now 
As mad as the ves'd sea ; singing aloud ; 
Crown'd with rank fumiter and furrow-weeds, 
With bur-docks, hemlock, nettles, cuckoo-flowers, 
Darnel, and all the idle weeds that grow 
In our sustaining corn. 

Lear, iv, 4, 1. 

Holly. 
Heigh-ho ! sing, heigh-ho ! unto the green holly : 
Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly : 
Then, heigh-ho, the holly! 
This life is most jolly. 

As You Like It, ii, 7, 180. 

Honeysuckle. 
And bid her steal into the pleached bower, 
Where honeysuckles, ripened by the sun, 
Forbid the sun to enter. 

Much Ado About Nothing, iii, 1, 7. 

Hyssop, see Lettuce. 

Ibis. 
His crest that prouder than blue iris bends. 

Troilus and Cressida, i, 3, 380. 

Ivy, see Elm. 

Knot-grass. 
Get you gone, you dwarf ; 
You minimus, of hindering knot-grass made ; 
You bead, you acorn. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, iii, 2, 327. 

Lady-smocks, see Cuckoo-bud. 

Larks' Heels. 

Larks'-heels trim. 

Two Noble Kinsmen, introd. song. 

Latjeel. 
To whom the heavens in thy nativity 
Adjudged an olive branch and laurel crown, 
As likely to be blest in peace and war. 

3 Henry VI, iv, 6, 34. 

LA VENDEE. 

Here's flowers for you ; 
Plot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram ; 
The marigold, that goes to bed wi' the sun 
And with him rises weeping : these are flowers 
Of middle summer, and I think they are given 
To men of middle age. 

Winter's Tale, iv, 4, 103. 

Leek. 
Your majesty says very true : if your 
majesties is remembered of it, the Welshmen 
did good service in a garden where leeks did 
grow, wearing leeks in their Monmouth caps ; 
which, your majesty know, to this hour is 
an honourable badge of the service ; and I do 
believe your majesty takes no scorn to wear 
the leek upon Saint Tavy's day. 

Henry V, iv, 7, 101. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



THE FLOWERS OF SHAKESPEARE. 



Lemon. 



Biron 



Iago: 



A lemon. 



Philip : 



Ariel 



Iago: 



Oberon 



Tamora : 



Volumnia 



Bottom 



Euphronius : 



Love's Labour's Lost, v, 2, 653. 

Lettuce. 
'Tis in ourselves that we 
are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens, to 
the which our wills are gardeners ; so that if we 
will plant nettles, or sow lettuce, set hyssop and 
weed up thyme, supply it with one gender of 
herbs, or distract it with many, either to have it 
sterile with idleness, or manured with industry, 
why, the power and corrigible authority of this 
lies in our wills. 

Othello, i, 3, 322. 

Lilt. 

But thou art fair, and at thy birth, dear boy, 
Nature and Fortune join'd to make thee great : 
Of Nature's gifts thou mayst with lilies boast 
And with the half-blown rose. 

John, iii, 1, 51. 

Linden. 
In the line-grove which weather-fends your cell. 

Tempest, v, 1, 10. 

Locust. 

The food that to him now is as luscious as 
locusts, shall be to him shortly as bitter 
as coloquintida. 



Othello, i, 3, 354. 



Long Purple, see Crow-flower. 



Love-in-idleness. 

The bolt of Cupid fell : 
It fell upon a little western flower, 
Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound, 
And maidens call it love-in-idleness. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, ii, 1, 165. 

Mallow, see Dock. 
Mandkagoba, see Poppy. 
Marigold, see Lavender. 
Marjoram, see Lavender. 

Mary-bud. 
And winking Mary-buds begin 



to ope their golden eyes. 



Cymbeline, ii, 3, 25. 



Mint, see Lavender. 

Mistletoe. 
The trees, though summer, j^et forlorn and lean, 
O'ercome with moss and baleful mistletoe. 

Titus Andronicus, ii, 5, 94. 

Mulberry. 
Humble as the ripest mulberry 
That will not hold the handling. 

Coriolanus, iii, 2, 79. 

Mustard-seed. 
Good Master Mustardseed, I know your patience well. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, iii, 1, 196 

Myrtle. 
I was of late as petty to his ends 
As is the morn-dew on the myrtle-leaf 
To his grand sea. 

Antony and Cleopatra, iii, 12, 8. 



10 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



Comiuius : 



Iris 



Enobarbus : 



Beatrice : 



Ophelia : 



Iris : 



King Richard 



Romeo : 
Benvolio 
Romeo : 



Juliet : 



Iago : 



Nettle, sec Lettuce. 

Oak. 

He proved best man i' the field, and for his meed 
Was brow-bound with the oak. 

. Coriolanus, ii, 2, 101. 

Oats. 

Thy rich leas 
Of wheat, rye, barley, vetches, oats and peas. 

Tempest, iv, 1, GO. 

Olive, see Laurel. 

Onion. 
The tears live in an onion 
that should water this sorrow. 

Antony and Cleopatra, i, 2, 176. 

Oeange. 
The count is neither sad, nor sick nor 
merry, nor well ; but civil count, civil as an 
orange, and something of that jealous complexion. 

Much Ado About Nothing, ii. 1, 303. 

Oxlip, see Flower-de-luce. 

Pansy. 

And there is pansies, 
that's for thoughts, 



Hamlet, iv, 5, 17G. 



Peas, see Oats. 



Peony. 

Thy banks with pioned and twilled brims, 
Which spongy April at thy best betrims. 

Tempest, iv, 1, 64. 

Pine. 
But when from under this terrestrial ball 
He fires the proud tops of the eastern pines. 

Richard II, iii, 2, 41. 

Pink. 

Maiden pinks, of odour faint, 
Daisies sme!l-less. yet most quaint, 
And sweet thyme true. 

Two Noble Kinsmen, i, 1, song. 

Plantain. 
Your plantain-leaf is excellent for that. 
For what, I pray rhee? 

For your broken shin. 

Romeo and Juliet, i, 2, 52. 

Pomegranate. 
Wilt thou be gone? it is not yet near day: 
It was the nightingale, and not the lark, 
That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear ; 
Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate-tree : 
Believe me, love, it was the nightingale. 

Romeo and Juliet, iii, 5, 4. 

Poppy. 

Look, where he comes ! 

Not poppy, nor mandragora, 
Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world, 
Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep 
Which thou owedst yesterday. 

Othello, iii, 3, 330. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



THE FLOWERS OF SHAKESPEARE. 



11 



Perdita : 



Mrs Ford: 



Prince : 
Falstaff: 



2d Servant : 



Boyet : 



Plantagenet 



Somerset : 



Ophelia : 



Perdita 



1st Senator : 



Ely: 



Boyet : 



Primrose. 

Pale primroses, 
That die unmarried, ere they can behold 
Bright Phoebus in his strength, a malady 
Most incident to maids. 

Winter's Tale, iv, 4, 122. 

Pumpkin. 
We'll use this unwholesome 
humidity, this gross watery pumpion ; 
we'll teach him to know turtles from jays. 

Merry Wives of Windsor, iii, 3, 12. 

Radish. 

What, fought you with them all? 
All ! I know not what you call all ; but 
if I fought not with fifty of them, I am 
a bunch of radish. 

1 Henry IV, ii, 4, 201. 

Reed. 
I had as lief have a reed 
that will do me no service as a partisan I could 
not heave. 

Antony and Cleopatra, ii, 7, 13. 

Rose. 
Fair ladies masked are roses in their bud ; 
Dismasked, their damask sweet commixture shown, 
Are angels veiling clouds, or roses blown. 

Love's Labour's Lost, v, 2, 295. 

Rose (White and Red). 
Let him that is a true-born gentleman 
And stands upon the honour of his birth, 
If he suppose that I have pleaded truth, 
From off this brier pluck a white rose with me. 
Let him that is no coward nor no flatterer, 
But dare maintain the party of the truth, 
Pluck a red rose from off this thorn with me. 

1 Henry VI, ii, 4, 27. 

Rosemary. 
There's rosemary, that's for remembrance ; 
pray, love, remember. 

Hamlet iv, 5, 175. 

Rue. 

Reverend sirs, 
For you there's rosemary and rue : these keep 
Seeming and savour all the winter long. 

Winter's Tale, iv, 4, 74. 

Rush. 

Our gates, 
Which yet seem shut, we have but pinn'd with rushes ; 
They'll open of themselves. 

Coriolanus, i, 4, 18. 

Rye, Barley, see Oats. 

Savory, see Lavender. 

Strawberry. 
The strawberry grows underneath the nettle 
And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best 
Xeighbour'd by fruit of baser quality. 

Henry V, i, 1, GO. 

Sycamore. 
Under the cool shade of a sycamore 
I thought to close mine eyes some half an hour. 

Love's Labour's Lost, v, 2, S9. 



12 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



Bottom : 

Oberon : 
Anne : 

Perdita : 
Helena : 

Queen : 
Oberon : 



Oberon 



Tamora : 



Thistle. 
Kill me a red-hipped humble-bee on the top 
of a thistle. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, 



iv, 1, 12. 



Thyme. 
I know a bank where the wild thyme blows. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, ii, 1, 249. 

Tuekip. 
I had rather be set quick i' the earth 
And bowl'd to death with turnips ! 

Merry Wives of Windsor, iii, 4, 90. 

Vetches, see Oats. 

Violet. 

Violets dim, 
But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes, 
Or Cytherea's breath. 

Winter's Tale, iv, 4, 120. 

Wheat. 

O happy fair ! 
Tour eyes are lode-stars ; and your tongue's sweet air 
More tuneable than lark to shepherd's ear, 
When wheat is green, when hawthorn buds appear. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, i, 1, 182. 



Willow. 

There is a willow grows aslant a brook. 



Hamlet, iv, 7, 167. 



Woodbine ( Honeysuckle ) . 
I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, 
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, 
Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, 
With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine : 
There sleeps Titania sometime of the night, 
Lull'd in these flowers with dances and delight. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, ii, 1, 249. 

Woemwood. 
Be as thou wast wont to be ; 
See as thou wast wont to see : 
Dian's bud o'er Cupid's flower 
Hath such force and blessed power. 

Midsummer Night's Dream, iv. 



Tew. 
They told me they would bind me here 
Unto the body of a dismal yew, 
And leave me to this miserable death. 

Titus Andronicus, ii, 



1, 74. 



101 



VOl. 17, 110. 1] STANDARDIZATION OF LIBRARY PROFESSION. 



13 



STANDARDIZATION OF THE LIBRARY PROFESSION.* 

By Edith M. Coulter, Reference Lirbarian, University of California Library, 

Be i keley. 



Whenever two or three librarians are 
gathered together one hears the statement 
that there is no calling so little under- 
stood or appreciated by the layman as 
that of librarian. How often one is 
asked just what you do in the library, 
or the librarian is aproached by someone 
who simply must support herself and 
thinks that she would like to work in a 
library. Why does this ignorance of 
requirements exist? To me the princi- 
pal reason lies in the fact that we have 
no standards. Let us for a moment face 
the facts. 

We all know of libraries in which 
one finds on the staff an assistant, who 
is a college graduate and who has com- 
pleted a two-year course in a library 
school. On the same staff one finds an 
assistant, with only a grammar school 
education, without the benefits of culture 
or travel, who in other words, has no 
formal education or its equivalent. Both 
assistants are known to the public as 
librarians. Wbuld such a condition exist 
in any other calling that had any connec- 
tion with the education, the welfare and 
the uplift of society? Can we expect re- 
spect for a profession, if such it may be 
called, that is recruited largely from 
untrained and often uneducated persons? 
One speaks of a physician and everyone 
knows exactly what his education and 
training has been. He is a graduate of 
a college, has spent three years in a 
medical school and one year as an in- 
terne in a hospital. This physician has 
in his employ a young woman, who 
answers the telephone, makes appoint- 
ments, renders bills, but does the public 
ever make the mistake of referring to her 
as a physician? 

•Take the profession of nursing. For 
those who have had their training in 
the last few years, one knows what that 
training' represents. The nurse is a high 
school graduate, she has had two years 
training in a hospital of a certain size, 
and she has completed a prescribed 
course of lectures. 



*Paper read at meeting of California 
Library Association, Lake Tahoe, June 
1921. 



In the 1918 report on higher education 
by the University of the State of New 
York we find the following : 

What delays the development of the 
library profession? Not the need for 
skilled, experienced and educate! libra- 
rians, nor is it the lack of schools, of 
leaders, or of associations. It is the ab- 
sence of public recognition. The duties im- 
posed by the Hippocratic oath brought 
the practitioner of medicine into public 
notice, the ordination vows of ministers 
attracted the attention of the laity, the 
bar imposed requirements upon the prac- 
titioners that were recognized by the pub- 
lic in general. The necessity of protecting 
the public from unskilled and incompetent 
practitioners of medicine and at the bar 
led to licensing requirements. Teaching 
became a profession when voluntarily the 
local authorities united in uniform licens- 
ing examinations. Librarianship will be- 
come a profession when standards of 
requirement for admission to a licensing 
examination and their administration are 
placed in the hands of an independent 
authority representing the general public. 

Granted that public recognition is de- 
pendent on standardization, how can 
standardization be accomplished in the 
library profession? 

There appear to be three main lines 
along which we may work : First, the 
standardization of library schools ; sec- 
ond, the standardization of libraries ; 
third, the standardization of librarians. 

The first step, in my opinion, is the 
standardization of library schools. At 
the present time in the United States 
to have had library school training may 
mean that one is a graduate of a high 
school with one year at a library school, 
or that one has had three years of 
college and one year of library school 
training, or a college graduate and one 
year in a library school, or a college 
graduate aud two years in a library 
school. To say nothing of apprentice 
classes, summer schools, and .short 
courses. 

The Association of American Library 
Schools has accredited the majority of 
library schools in the country. This has 
brought about a certain standard of 
courses of instruction but has done little 
to raise or unify the entrance require- 
ments. 

The degree of Bachelor of Library 
Science is granted at certain schools on 



14 



news notes of California LIBRARIES. [January, 1922 



the completion of a two-year graduate 
course, at certain other schools for one 
year's graduate work. I was told re- 
cently at the University of California that 
the degree of Bachelor of Library 
Science meant nothing in the academic 
world, although many on the library 
staff of that institution have spent six 
years after high school in acquiring this 
degree. 

In my opinion a degree from a recog- 
nized college should be the entrance re- 
quirement for all library schools. On the 
successful completion of a year devoted 
to technical training, the degree of Bachi 
elor of Library Science should be granted. 
On the conclusion of a second year's 
course, to be taken by those who wish to 
prepare for a more specialized or scholarly 
position, an advanced degree, i. e. Master 
of Library Science, should be awarded. 
Summer and short courses should be 
offered for those who are holding library 
positions. 

Some years ago the medical schools of 
the country were graded by the Carnegie 
Foundation. The results of this classify 
cation were decidedly beneficial to medical 
education. This spring the Carnegie Cor- 
poration made a survey of the library 
schools of the United States. Let us 
hope that the results of this survey will 
be made public and that it will cause a 
similar stimulation to library school train- 
ing. 

The second step that would aid in this 
scheme of standardization is the grading 
or classification of libraries. We- main- 
tain that libraries are educational insti- 
tutions, and educational institutions art 
classified. We are familiar with approved 
colleges, and accredited high schools, but 
we have no basis for grading libraries 
and no standards expressed in terms that 
mean the same thing to all people. Li- 
braries are a different type of educational 
institution from schools offering courses 
of formal instruction, but they play a 
very important part in our educational 
system. I admit that there would be 
great difficulty in grading libraries. The 
population, the value of taxable property, 
the number of volumes, the circulation of 
books, the education and training of the 
library staff, the quality of service ren- 
dered would all have to be taken into 



consideration. The value of such a classi- 
fication by a disinterested body would be 
of immeasurable value to the librarian 
in a campaign for increased support. It 
would also serve as a stimulus to greater 
effort to libraries rated low in the scale. 

To come to the third factor in a 
scheme for standardization — raising the 
standard of librarianship. There are sev- 
eral factors that will assist in bringing 
this about. 

First and most important, the granting 
)f a certificate or a license, by a properly 
constituted body, to those qualified to 
hold the position of librarian. This sub- 
ject was so adequately discussed in the 
morning program, that I will not go 
into it further. 

Secondly, the adoption of uniform des- 
ignation for certain types of positions. 
We have a few standard titles that mean 
the same in different libraries — that of 
librarian, reference librarian, cataloguers. 
There is confusion in the use of the term 
assistant librarian and library assistant. 
The librarian in charge of a department 
is called the head, the chief, the super- 
visor, the superintendent. There are li- 
brarians who have a tendency to look 
upon members of their staffs as their 
employees, even though they have the 
same professional training and profes- 
sional outlook on their work. This 
creates a low morale in the library and 
the public reflects the attitude held by 
the head. There are advantages to be 
obtained if we come to an agreement 
•especting the proper titles to apply to 
arious positions and librarians could do 
nuch to standardize the nomenclature of 
ibrary service. 

Not a little can be accomplished' toward 
standardization by grading positions 
vithiu a library. For example, at the 
[Jniyersity of California the minimum 
requirement for a junior assistant, the 
lowest grade in the library service, is a 
university degree and at least summei 
ibrary school training. In fact, at pres- 
ent all junior assistants have had one 
rear of library school training. All 
others are called clerical assistants and 
are not considered candidates for promo- 
tion to the library roll. This places all 
librarians in the General Library on a 
professional basis. 



Vol. 17, 110. 1] STANDARDIZATION OF LIBRARY PROFESSION. 



15 



Librarians can individually aid in rais- 
ing the standard of the profession by 
self improvement and continued work 
along professional lines, and also in a 
more professional attitude. Librarians 
should keep up with their professional 
literature. Two or three evenings a 
month would accomplish this. To me 
it is inexcusable for an assistant in a 
library in which the professional period- 
icals were available, upon being asked 
her opinion on certification to say that she 
"knew nothing about it and had no 
opinions.'' 

Librarians should be members of 
national and state associations. Our 
state association, due to the activities of 
its membership committee, is iu a fair 
way to have a 100 per cent membership. 
Librarians should attend state meetings, 
whenever possible, and there is little 
excuse for failure to attend a district 
meeting. 

Too little thought is given to the sub- 
ject of professional ethics, although many 
breaches occur. Library schools should 
give some attention to this iu their 
course of instruction. To mention only 
two important aspects of this sub- 
ject — Assistants frequently resign on in- 
sufficient notice. This is often the fault 
of the employing institution, that insists 
upon the appointee taking up her new 
duties in a ridiculously short space of 
time. Librarians should agree upon the 
length of time between the date of resig- 
nation and the termination of duty. 
Another example is that of the librarian 
who, instead of determining the amount 
of salary a position will carry, tries to 
secure the assistant at the least possible 
sum. There are those who may consider 
this good business but it is poor ethics. 
We should also have some guidance con- 
cerning the ethics of making application 
for positions. 

Librarians are wont to think their pro- 
fessional education ended when they have 
completed a library school course and 
have secured a position. How few con- 
tinue professional study or make any 
contribution to library science. We have 
such a limitless field for bibliographic re- 
search. Investigation of a subject that 
pertains to the records of man's achieve- 



ment and with the forms in which that 
achievement has been preserved iu our 
libraries will add as much to the libra- 
rian's culture as any subject in a uni- 
versity curriculum. There is much need 
for this type of study in our scholarly 
libraries or by library school instructors. 
We have no school offering advanced 
instruction in bibliography, no school 
offering courses that lead to a profes- 
sional degree higher than Bachelor of 
Library Science. It is hoped that the 
time will come, and it will when there is 
sufficient demand, for at least one school 
for graduate librarians. If our library 
schools connected with institutions of 
higher learning are to hold their posi- 
tion with other technical and vocational 
schools, the instructors should hold a 
degree higher than that granted to their 
graduates. Until such a school is estab- 
lished advanced academic degrees can be 
obtained for meritorious bibliographic 
work in our universities. Mr Keough 
in an article in the Library Journal for 
September 1919, says : 

"A discriminating selection of the best 
books on any subject of importance, with 
careful annotations showing the scope and 
limitations of each book, and references 
to others that correct or supplement it, 
would probably be accepted anywhere for 
the master's degree ; while the rare biblio- 
graphical dissertion that not only incor- 
porates discoveries of importance, but by 
sound criticism throws light on disputed 
literary or historical or other problems, 
night be offered for the degree of doctor 
of philosophy. The dean of the Yale 
Graduate School is very willing to give 
legrees for bibliographical work." 

There exists a fundamental reason why 
'ibrarians have done so little advanced 
vork along professional lines. It is for 
he very obvious reason that they have 
in time. Little original work can be 
lone at the end of a seven or eight hour 
lay or a thirty-eight to forty-two hour 
week. 

Library trustees and in some cases 
librarians show little sympathy for this 
crying need for scholarly work. They 
do not see that the result of such study 
would bring more to the library than 
increasing the circulation per volume per 
minute. Assistants who show any inter- 
est in continuing their professional edu- 
cation should receive every encourage- 
ment. A request for a leave of absence 



16 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



in order to carry on a definite piece of 
work should not be considered as a 
demerit, but rather basis for promotion. 
Our public school teachers are urged to 
attend summer school and iu the larger 
schools are granted years' leave, promo- 
tion often depending on continued study. 
Stanford University Library is taking 
the lead in this respect. Last year the 
librarian was granted a sabbatical leave 
and this year heads of departments have 
been granted the same privileges as mem- 
bers of the faculty — that is, a precedent 
has been established granting one quarter 
in four free for study and recuperation. 
President Wilbur apparently realized that 
librarians should - have the same opportu- 
nity for continued study as their col- 
leagues on the faculty. 

Exchange of position for a year would 
in many cases prove of great value to a 



library. A plan of exchange should be 
worked out between two institutions of 
similar size. There are difficulties, of 
course, as the advantages would be largely 
on the side of the western libraries, but 
in my opinion they are not insurmount- 
able. 

I have briefly sketched some of the 
factors in standardization of the library 
profession. It is a foregone conclusion 
that any movement for standardization 
must come from within, from librarians. 
Conditions will be the same twenty years 
from now unless we insist upon an ade- 
quate system of training, a recognized 
standard of fitness for different grades of 
the profession and a system of certifica- 
tion to designate those found to be quali- 
ied. This and only this will standardize 
the library profession. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CERTIFICATION OF LIBRARIANS. 



17 



CERTIFICATION OF LIBRARIANS IN OTHER STATES.* 

By Elta L. Camper, Senior Assistant, University of California Library, Berkeley, 



I have been asked to give you a brief 
survey of the certification plans of other 
states. Various state library association? 
have had the subject under serious con- 
sideration for some time past and have 
finally adopted definite schemes drawn 
up by committees appointed for that pur- 
pose. The state associations realize also, 
that to be most effective, certification 
should be a legislative measure and are 
bending their efforts toward that end. 
The crying need for trained librarians, 
the inability of insufficiently trained 
people to meet the demands of even the 
average position, must eventually bring 
about standardization and certification. 

Ohio.— In 190S the Ohio Library Asso- 
ciation unanimously gave its sanction 
to a bill providing for a state board of 
library examiners and the examination 
of librarians. The bill provided that no 
one, a year from its passage, could hold 
a position in a public library in Ohio 
without a certificate. The certificate 
might be "for life," in which case the 
applicant must have had five years' ex- 
perience, or temporary for a certain num- 
ber of years. Anyone already holding a 
position and who would have had five 
years' experience at the time the act be- 
came effective would be exempt from 
examination, but all others must take an 
examination and receive a certificate. 
The certificates were to be valid in any 
public library in the state, but the larger 
public libraries might issue certificates 
through a local board to be valid only 
in the library where issued. This bill 
failed to become a law. 

Illinois.— In 1917 the Legislative Com- 
mittee of the Illinois Library Associa- 
tion recommended a law providing for 
the certification of librarians. The bill 
provided for a board of library exam- 
iners to determine grades of service, hold 
examinations and issue certificates. The 



*Paper read at meeting of California 
19,9i ary Association > La ke Tahoe, June 

See also State Certification of Libraries, 
Public Libraries, February, 1922, p. 95-8. 

2—16230 



report of the committee proposed to 
Bxenrpt from examination those who were 
employed on a certain date and also those 
who had been in the service of libraries 
previous to that time. The measure was 
accepted by the association and was in- 
troduced at the 1921 session of the 
legislature. 

Minnesota. — Last year the Minnesota 
Library Association appointed a commit- 
tee on certification which met at St. 
Paul and made the first draft of a cer- 
tification plan. Subcommittees were ap- 
pointed to secure any information as to 
the effect of the proposed plan and its 
assistance in large libraries. The plan 
will not affect those who already hold 
positions. At a meeting of the board 
this year the plans of the former commit- 
tee were discussed and some changes 
made. The plan is at present only tenta- 
tive. 

It is interesting to note that 
throughout the state of Minnesota with 
the exception of the Twin Cities ana 
Duluth only nine librarians have had 
full college training. Five of these hold 
positions in libraries on the Range'. 
Minnesota has forty counties or forty- 
seven per cent of the total number with 
libraries of 5O0O or more volumes, a 
higher percentage than that for the 
United States as a whole. 

Iowa. — In October, 1919, the Iowa Li- 
brary Association appointed a board com- 
posed of the chairman and secretary of 
the Iowa Library Commission, these 
being respectively ex officio chairman and 
secretary of the board of certification. 
The other three members, one to be a 
trustee, one a librarian, and one a li- 
brary, assistant, are elected for a term of 
three years each, by the Iowa Library 
Association. 

Four grades of certificates are issued : 

Grade A — Life certificate. 
Grade B — Five-year certificate. 
Grade C — Three-year certificate. 
Grade D — One-year certificate. 

Each grade of certificate requires li- 
brary training and experience or such 



18 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



equivalents as shall satisfy the National 
Board of Certification. 

The plan "is not intended to be retro- 
active, nor to affect librarians now in 
service unless they wish to apply for 
certificates. It is .simply placing a 
standard upon librarianship in the state 
of Iowa for the use of those who shall 
enter the work after the adoption of 
this plan by the Iowa Library Associa- 
tion." 

The first meeting of the certification 
board was held in January, 1920, and the 
forming of an executive committee 
authorized. At a meeting of the execu- 
tive committee held during the summer 
the first certificate was granted. Since 
then several applications have been filed 
with the secretary to be acted upon at 
the next meeting of the board. 

Neiv York. — After several years' dis- 
cussion and repeated revision of plans, 
the New York Library Association a 
year ago adopted a tentative plan recom- 
mended by the committee on standardiza- 
tion. After careful consideration by the 
committee, this plan with a few modifica- 
tions was resubmitted to the association 
at a meeting held September 22, 1920, 
and was unanimously approved and 
adopted. It was recommended that an 
effort be made to secure its adoption a( 
the 1921 session of the legislature. 

The plan is briefly as -follows: 

No vacancy in the position of head 
librarian or director of any public 
library in a municipality or district 
with a population of 3000 or over 
shall be filled hereafter by any person 
not holding a librarian's certificate 
No one, however, shall be required to 
obtain a certificate to keep his 
present position. 

Librarians' certificates shall be of four 
grades : 

Librarians' life state certificate, 
Five-year certificate, 
Three-year certificate, 
Two-year certificate, 

each with a definite standard of training 
and experience. 

The five, three, and two year certifi- 
cates may be renewed for life if the per- 
>-i desiring it gives evidence of success- 
ful library administration during the 
period for which the certificate was 
issued. 



Life state certificates shall be valid 
in any municipality or district of the 
state, five-year certificates in any having 
a population of 50,000 or less, three-year 
certificates in any wifh a pouplation of 
20,000 or less, and two-year certificates in 
any municipality or district with a popu- 
lation of 5000 or less. 

If no qualified librarian is available 
for a position requiring a two-year certifi- 
cate, upon written application of the 
library trustees, the president of the uni- 
versity may issue a provisional certifi- 
cate valid for one year from date of 
issue. This certificate shall not be re- 
newed or extended. 

The committee recommended that to- 
gether with the proposed certification 
plan there should be coupled a small 
state appropriation to be paid libraries 
employing a certified librarian. A pro- 
posal for service grants was therefore 
submitted at the same time which pro- 
vides for an allotment of public money 
to be used toward the payment of the 
librarian's salary. These grants apply 
only to head librarians. No library not 
having a certified librarian would receive 
such grants. 

To summarize, the New York plan pro- 
vides for a graded system of certificates 
for librarians and for direct state aid in 
the payment of the salaries of certified 
librarians. It applies only to the posi- 
tion of head librarian or director; is com- 
pulsory only in places of 3000 popula- 
tion or over ; is compulsory only as 
vacancies occur after the plan goes into 
effect ; it provides for the issuance of 
certificates only to those who qualify for 
them — but — does not deprive anyone of 
his present position. 

The committee realize that the present 
plan does not provide for as high a stand- 
ard as it might, but the plan seems to be 
the most feasible one for the present. 
The fact that certification applies only to 
the position of head librarian is partially 
offset by the fact that a competent head 
librarian will do much to raise the stand- 
ard of subordinate positions. 

Wisconsin. — The Wisconsin certifica- 
tion plan provides for certification in four 
grades depending first upon academic 
education, library training and experi- 
ence, and second provides that for these 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CERTIFICATION OF LIBRARIANS. 



19 



qualifications may be substituted equiva- 
lent attainments as sbown in examina- 
tions held by the State Certification 
Board. 

The State Library Certification Board 
is to be composed of five members : 

Two appointed by the governor from 
nominees chosen by the Wisconsin 
Library Commission. 

One library trustee appointed by the 
governor. 

One from the Wisconsin Library 
Commission staff selected by the 
commission. 

One from the faculty of the univer- 
sity nominated by the president 
of the university and not to be 
connected with library work. 

The four grades of certificates are as 

follows : 

First grade — requiring 

Three years of college work. 
One year of library school. 
Two years' experience. 

Second grade — requiring 
One year of college work. 
One year of library school. 
Two years' experience. 

Third grade — requiring 
High school graduation. 
Six weeks of library school. 
One year's experience. 

Fourth grade — requiring 

High school graduation and such 
additional requirements as shall 
satisfy the board that the appli- 
cant can do successful work in the 
position for which his certificate 
shall make him eligible. 

The board may grant a certificate of 
any grade to a candidate without the re- 
quired training if the candidate shows 
by examination and otherwise that he has 
the equivalent attainments. 

Any person holding a public library 
position on January 1, 1923, may con- 
tinue in the position without a certificate. 
Any person who has held a position for 
one year at any time prior to January 1, 
1923, may be granted a certificate of any 
grade provided he has shown his ability 
in the position in which the certificate 
would authorize his employment. He 
must, however, apply for the certificate 
before January 1, 1925. 

The certification board may issue a 
license to any person with required 
academic and library training but who 
lacks the required experience. In cases 



vhere two years' experience are required 
his license may be renewed for one year, 
if the applicant has proved his success. 

After January 1, 1923, no person may 
'iold a position as librarian or assistant 
who does not hold a library certificate. 
Xo one may be librarian in charge of a 
mblic library in a city with a population 
of SOCO or over unless he holds a first- 
grade certificate, or in charge of a public 
library in a city with a population of 
2000 to £000 without at least a second- 
jrade certificate. 

If a public library in a city with a 
population of 2000' or over is unable to 
secure a librarian to place in charge of 
a public library, the certification board 
may grant a permit to the library board 
o employ a person without the required 
certificate. This permit is valid for six 
nonths and in case of emergency may be 
enewed once for six months. 

To sum up Wisconsin, let me quote 
from the report of the chairman of the 
certification committee : "The Wisconsin 
plan of certification was worked out on 
three principles, the establishment of dis- 
tinct grades of service, the safeguarding 
of the rights and interests of those al- 
ready in library work, and the oppor- 
tunity for any one to enter library work 
by tests of his education, training and 
experience." In concluding, the report 
says : "Wisconsin librarians are used to 
handing out Wisconsin laws regulating all 
kinds of employment and also buying 
books to help people prepare for exam- 
inations on innumerable subjects in order 
to obtain a state license. Wisconsin li- 
brarians, therefore, feel no fear of this 
kind of legislation and have faith that 
this is the most effective way to treat 
their own needs as a profession." 

"The bill for the certification of li- 
brarians has been introduced into the 
Wisconsin legislature and it is expected 
will be favorably reported by both the 
Senate and House Committees within a 
short time."* 

I wrote to Illinois, New York and 
Wisconsin where legislation was pending. 
I received no reply from Illinois, but 
New York replied that the bill passed the 
legislature and was signed by the gov- 



*Library Journal April 1, 1921. 



20 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



ernor. Wisconsin replied that its bill 
passed the legislature and was in the 
hands of the governor. 

To summarize briefly — Ohio has appar- 
ently made no further effort since the 
attempt that failed ; Illinois introduced 
its bill at the 1921 session of the legisla- 
ture ; the Minnesota plan is at present 
merely tentative ; the Iowa certification 



plan is working successfully under the 
Iowa Library Association ; the New York 
bill passed the legislature and was signed 
by the governor ; the Wisconsin bill 
passed the legislature and ten days ago 
was awaiting the signature of the gov- 
ernor.f 



fThe Wisconsin bill was signed by the 
governor. 



VOl.17 110. 1] CERTIFICATION — ASSISTANT'S POINT OF VIEW. 



21 



CERTIFICATION FROM THE LIBRARY ASSISTANT'S 
POINT OF VIEW.* 

By Helen E. Vogelson, Assistant Librarian, Los Angeles Co. Free Library. 

It was impossible to send the ques- 
tionnaire to all the libraries in the state, 
so a representative group was selected as 
follows : 



When asked to present the subject of 
certification from the assistant's point of 
view, the impulse was to decline, because 
so little has appeared in print, and so 
many remarks pro and con have been 
voiced, made rather casually, and proba- 
bly without much thought, that the task 
of getting any formulated opinion from 
library assistants seemed well nigh hope- 
less. But "what must be done can be 
done", said the founder of the first col- 
lege for women in America. 

The general question of standardization 
of library work and certification of li- 
brary workers is recurring with greater 
frequency and we all know that its 
acceptance is coming. It is time then 
that we inform ourselves about it, that 
we discuss it aud try to clarify our ideas, 
so that we may be prepared to vote in- 
telligently when the question is presented. 
Library assistants of today — the libra- 
rians of tomorrow — hold the same high 
ideals regarding their chosen work as 
the librarians of today, and all together 
are anxious to see the work advance 
under the best auspices. 

The library assistant of today is am- 
bitious and either has a certificate from 
a library school or is willing to study to 
get one. unless she expects to remain 
permanently in the sub-professional class, 
or go into some other business, or get 
married. There are exceptions, of course, 
but this probably covers the average 
standpoint. 

A questionnaire seemed to be the only 
means by which some census of opinion 
might be gleaned and this paper is an 
attempt to present the composite answers 
to a set of eight questions sent out about 
a month ago to 38 libraries in this state, 
to be returned, signed or unsigned by 
individuals, or filled in as a vote of the 
library staff. 



*Paper read at meeting of California 
Library Association, Lake Tahoe, June 
1921. 



4 large libraries ; 
16 small libraries ; 
14 county libraries : 

2 university libraries ; 

1 public school library, and 

1 graduating class of a library 
training school. 

Of the 235 copies distributed, 114 
came back signed by individuals, and 3 
sets representing a vote by the staff oi 
the respective libraries. Two of the 
larger libraries, 3 county libraries, and 
10 smaller libraries did not return any 
answers. The number responding has 
been perhaps a little above the usual 
average and the interest and spirit of 
co-operation shown in assisting the 
writer to get the information wanted, is 

'tefully acknowledged. 

The returns on the canvass show an 
almost unanimous opinion in favor of 
standardization and certification. None 
have voted no, and only two voted yes 
with any reservation. It is hardly prob- 
able that all those from whom no answers 
were received would vote no. These are 
busy days and a questionnaire takes time, 
but it was hoped that if there is anyone 
who does not believes that certification 
is something to be desired, that he, or 
she, would have the courage of their 
conviction and take this opportunity to 
say so, giving their reason. May we not 
therefore conclude that the silent ones 
were at least not opposed to the right 
kind of a certification plan? 

As we proceed to tabulate the replies to 
the various questions do not forget this 
attitude toward certification, leading like 
a thread through the labyrinth of details 
and difficulties. 

Before plunging into the maze, we are 
reminded of the track-walker who was 



22 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



instructed to report as briefly as possi- 
ble the conditions along his section. He 
wired "River is where railroad was." 
The large response to the questionnaire 
and the earnest attitude toward the sub- 
ject, preclude the track-walker's brief re- 
ply, and we hope that this report will 
show something constructive rather than 
destructive. 

Questions involving detail were elimi- 
nated as much as possible and only those 
stated which might help to clarify our 
notions and lead to an expression of 
faith. 

The following definitions were stated : 

Standardization of library work will 
mean establishment of a graded classifica- 
tion by law or by vote of a library asso- 
ciation. 

The Grades of Classification to be 
based on Training, Experience and 
Merit. 

A Certificate to be issued to the can- 
didate who passes the requirements set 
by the Board authorized to grant certifi- 
• cation. 

The answers to the first question : 

1. Do you think a standardization of li- 
brary work would advance library work 
as a profession? 

have already been noted as practically 
unanimous, 3 votes by staff and 114 by 
individuals, of whom only 2 qualified 
their vote of yes. 

The lesson learned from the certifica- 
tion of teachers, nurses, public account- 
ants, and other workers has evidently 
been taken to heart and their advance- 
ment and standing noted, particularly 
that of teachers. For it was not until 
certification for all grades of teachers was 
provided for by law, did teaching cease 
to be regarded as a tide-over occupation 
for those unfitted for any other work, 
and advance to the dignity of a profes- 
sion; 

2. Do you believe certification would help 
the library worker? 

(o) To a more agreeable position. 
(b) To a better salary. 

One hundred six voted yes; two voted 
no, and some did not answer. A number 
commented on the fact that certification 
has proved a benefit to county and high 
school librarians. 



The library assistant, who seeks a re* 
sponsible position must show tangible 
proof of his or her qualifications, if not 
in the form of a certificate, then in some 
equivalent, or take an examination, per- 
haps do both, under civil service. Stand- 
ardization and legalized certification 
should be accepted in place of civil serv- 
ice examinations and would be in time, 
no doubt. At present, the library assist- 
ant who does not hold a certificate from 
a library school has no standing except 
in the library where she is employed, as 
claimed by the members of the Library 
Workers Association. Certification of 
all library workers would meet this 
charge of discrimination. 

It is possible some persons may secure 
certificates who are not eminently fitted 
for the work. It is so in other profes- 
sions. Errors of commission and omis- 
sion may occur, but with a Board which 
provides for an appeal, mistakes may be 
corrected, also a way of escape provided 
from the arbitrary or unfair judgment 
of a biased librarian. 

3. Would you favor a certification plan 
that would not affect library workers 
now in the service, unless they wish to 
apply for certificates? 

Many skipped this question, perhaps 
because it was not understood. Fifty-two 
voted yes and 36 voted no. Constitution- 
ally no such law could be enforced be- 
cause it would be retroactive. 

But the privilege of securing certifi- 
cates should not be denied those already 
in the service. 

4. Do you think that certificates should 
be granted to those already in the 
service based on past experience and 
present position? 

This question presumes that merit and 
efficiency have appeared somewhere along 
the line. 

Eighty-eight answered yes; 13 answered 
no, and the suggestion was offered that 
a special certificate might be granted to 
those whose experience and effective work 
warranted this. Two suggested that it 
should be based on past work and not 
present position, and two others, vice 
versa. Here are evidently two persons 
who know of misfits. Certification ought, 
to help them out of the hole, square, or 
round. 



Vol. 17, no. 1] CERTIFICATION — ASSISTANT'S POINT OF VIEW. 



23 



But seriously, should certificates be 
granted to those in the work, based on 
past work and experience, without an 
examination? Would not the granting 
of certificates in such a wholesale fashion 
defeat the purpose of standardization, 
the establishment of an unchanging unit 
by which to measure library work? The 
requirements should be changed as the 
work develops, but not the standards. 

A few think that the plan should treat 
those already in the work as mildly as 
possible, and some others think that 
stimulation to a new code would produce 
good results. It is surprising how hard 
these library assistants can be upon 
themselves. Most of the certification 
plans adopted in other states apply only 
to the head librarians, but the replies to 
our questionnaire indicate that the 
scheme should apply to assistants also, 
and that most assistants are willing to 
meet the requirements. 

5. Should all those coming into library 
work after a plan has been adopted 
be required to be certificated? 

Ninety-two answered yes, unreservedly. 
Others gave various answers. Of course 
no certification plan should entirely rule 
out untrained help, though the number 
actually employed might be limited. 
Every librarian should be left free in this 
matter. Union labor ideas should have 
no place in work of a civic nature. 

Some fear was expressed that certifi- 
cation requirements would cause a 
greater scarcity of new recruits and that 
young people seeking a vocation would 
be discouraged from entering library 
work. (Libraries under civil service 
regulations have suffered no greater short- 
age of applicants.) And it is quite prob- 
able that library Avork would appeal to 
many people willing to meet the require- 
ments if the work were recognized as 
a profession and better salaries were 
paid to justify the special preparation. 

Every bit of equipment a prospective 
worker can command should count in her 
favor, but only an Elementary Certifi- 
cate should be granted until after a cer- 
tain season of experience has passed. 

6. Would you prefer that the system of 
standardization and certification be 
established — 

(a) By an act of the Legislature 
(&) By a vote of the California Li- 
brary Association. 



There were various answers to this 
question. 

44 would prefer action by the Legis- 
lature. 

43 by vote of the California Library 
Association. 

IT by California Library Association 
first, to be acted on later by the 
Legislature. 
3 by California Library Association, 
and then ratified by the American 
Library Association, and 

2 would prefer to await the initial 
action of the American Library 
Association. 

It is a question if any plan not enacted 
by legislation would prove beneficial. 
No other profession has a voluntary 
scheme of certification, to my knowledge. 

It has been stated that library work 
is the only informal profession and that 
this informality is an advantage. We 
would like to find the meat in the kernel 
of this statement. It is a nut we are 
unable to crack. 

It has also been stated that library 
workers are too small a group to nee I 
outside and formal recognition of stand- 
ardization and that we are sufficient unto 
ourselves. There is no question that 
standardization had best come while the 
group is small. The plan could be 
applied more easily and we should profit 
by the experience of teachers as stated 
in the beginning, namely, that teaching 
was not recognized as a profession until 
certification was provided for by law. 

Since some of our cities are organized 
under charters it will be necessary that 
any plan of certification to cover all cir- 
cumstances and conditions must be the 
resulting action of both the legislature 
and the library association, in order to be 
lawful, enduring and beneficial. 

7. How would you suggest that the Cer- 
tification Board be chosen? 

More suggestions were made for this 
than we can possibly report. When the 
time comes for an actual decision of the 
question no doubt an opportunity to say 
how this Board should 'be chosen will be 
offered. 

But we must here record that it is 
(he general opinion that the Certification 
Board must necessarily be a widely rep- 



24 



news notes op CALIFORNIA libraries. [January, 1922 



resentative body, including as Jiar as pos- 
sible all classes and kinds of libraries, 
and library workers of standing, with per- 
haps two persons from some other kind 
of nearly related work. 

8. Should the ruies and regulations of the 
Certification Board be approved by the 
California Library Association? 

The best thought and opinion is that 
the Board of Certification should have the 
power to make its own rules and regula- 
tions and be free to act independently. 
I would like to quote here from the re- 
port of the American Library Association 
Committee on National Certification. 
"The proposed National Board will be re- 
sponsible for working out the details of 
the certification and accrediting system. 
It must be made up of the ablest and 
most experienced members of the pro- 
fession, whose minds will be open to all 
helpful suggestions and who will go about 
their important work with the single 
purpose of doing the constructive and 
helpful thing. The Board will not pass 
back to the Association the responsibility 
for making decisions in matters of de- 
tail. We must expect to delegate to it 
the task of devising and administering 
a certification system. We shall judge 
it by its fruit. We must give it time and 
then if it fails to accomplish satisfactory 
results, our remedy, is, first, construc- 
tive criticism and, finally, change of per- 
sonnel brought about by the methods pro- 
vided in advance." 

9. This item provided a place to bring 
forward other arguments in favor of, 
or against certification, and invited the 
fullest expression. 

Many statements followed that the 
various kinds of library work should 
have various certificates, based on the 
different requirements for the types of 
service ; evidently having in mind the 
two certificates of County and High 
School librarian which are now granted 
in -this state. The University people feel 
that their work calls for a different kind 
of certificate, and the business librarian 
probably would think likewise. Then 
there should be an Elementary certificate 
for those who have followed a course 
of training, but lack experience ; and 
particularly a Special Certificate, per- 



haps of different grades, for those who 
have had much experience, but no library 
school training. 

These suggestions might be classed as 
details which should be left to the Board, 
but they are points of tremendous inter- 
est to each one of us, and the fate of any 
plan proposed, will probably depend on 
the general satisfaction with the classifi- 
cation scheme for the various kinds of 
library work. The university library 
worker will not want to be examined for 
county library work, nor will the per- 
son doing executive work enjoy being 
asked questions that belong to the 
elementary grade. Neither will it be 
fair to expect the beginner to know how 
to make up a library budget. 

Library assistants also feel that there 
should be some application of the prin- 
ciple of reciprocity. That certificates 
based on other library examinations from 
approved library schools, and under civil 
service, for instance, should have weight, 
so that the system of certification, does 
not become a "merry-go-round" of exam- 
inations. 

On the whole, little doubt was ex- 
pressed that certification would not be a 
benefit and a protection to all library 
workers. A few would limit it to head 
librarians, and another would include only 
the librarian and heads of departments. 

It seemed generally agreed that the 
small libraries would profit most in being 
protected from the predatory untrained 
librarian. We must not forget there are 
many very able librarians who have 
grown up with their work and are doing 
highly creditable work, and that some 
of them are better librarians than others 
who are trained. But the untrained per- 
son in any kind of work could be so much 
more effective if he, or she, had had a 
course of instruction, and it also follows 
that the trained person would be so much 
poorer if not trained. The number of 
persons in charge of small libraries who 
have gone so gladly to summer library 
schools have testified to this. 

One librarian has been heard to re- 
mark, "Well, certification may be all 
right, but I am only concerned to know 
what i"t will do to me." She acknowl- 
edged this is a narrow point of view, 



Vol. 17, no. 1] CERTIFICATION — ASSISTANT'S POINT OF VIEW. 



25 



but it is human. The reply made to her, 
was, that no certification plan ought to 
harm her, and then a question which 
challenged her was put, "But you surely 
want the best equipped person to succeed 
you, don't you?" 

The findings of the questionnaire may 
be summarized as follows : 

No arguments opposing standardization 
and certification were offered, but there 
were many statements showing variation 
of opinion regarding the enactment of a 
plan, the composition of the Board, the 
kind of certificates to be granted and to 
whom the plan should apply. 



And in conclusion, we shall quote the 
summary passed by vote of the staff of 
a public library, as follows, and to which 
all seemed fairly agreed : 

(a) That the standard of excellence in 
library work would be raised by a system 
of certification. 

(6) That certification would dignify 
the library profession in the eyes of the 
general public, 
and 

(c) That individual library workers 
would gain in privileges in both salary 
and professional advancement, under cer- 
tification. 



26 news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 

SUMMARY OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS IN 
THE UNITED STATES. 

A summary of county free library work in the United States was 
published by the California State Library in July, 1918, and supple- 
mented in April, 1920. The present summary is based on this earlier 
material and includes the county library laws passed in 1921. 

In order to facilitate the comparative study of the various county 
free library laws, each has been digested according to the same topical 
outline. The following table gives the key to this outline : 

I. Establishment. 
II. Governing board. 

III. Librarian. 

a. Appointment. 

b. Certification. 

c. Salary. 

IV. Support. 

V. Relation with municipal libraries. 

VI. Relation with school and other special libraries. 

VII. Contracts for service by established library. 

VIII. State supervision. 

IX. Disestablishment. 

Alabama. — Area 51,279 sq. mi.; pop. 2,348,174; counties 67. 
Law: General Acts of Alabama, 1919, Act No. 763. 

I. — By governing body of county. 
II. — By county library board consisting of probate judge as chair- 
man, county superintendent of schools and three others 
elected by above named authorities. 
III. — a. By county library board. 

c. Salary not specified. 
IV. — Appropriations from county treasury not to exceed $5,000 per 

year. 
V.— See VII. 
VI. — Rural, town or village school libraries may affiliate on applica- 
tion to county library board. 
VII. — Iu counties where a free public library is in operation, the 
county library board shall not be appointed, but the county 
library shall be administered by the governing board of such 
public library on terms agreed to by county authorities and 
such governing board. 
VIII. — State department of archives and history, which administers 
library extension activities of state, to encourage establish- 
ment of libraries and give free advice ; libraries to make such 
reports as department requests. 

This summary is correct as far as we have been able to get the desired information. 
Some omissions may be found that were not apparent in our checking. 



Vol. 17, 110. 1] SUMMARY COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS. 27 

California. — Area 158,360 sq. mi.; pop. 3,426,861; counties 58. 

Law: Statutes 1911, Chap. 68; 1921, Chap 40; Political Code, Sec. 
4041. 

I. — By resolution of board of supervisors after two weeks' publica- 
tion of notice of intention. 
II. — Board of supervisors. 
III. — a. Appointed by board of supervisors. 

b. County librarians must be certified by a state board of library 

examiners, composed of state librarian, librarian of the 
city and county of San Francisco, and the librarian of the 
Los Angeles public library. 

c. Salary fixed by statute for each county. 

IV. — a. By tax levy not to exceed one mill on the dollar of assessed 
valuation of all property except that in municipalities and 
districts which are not a part of the county library, 
b. From general county fund. 
V. — a. Municipal libraries are not included unless the governing 
board of the city notifies the board of supervisors that the 
city wishes to join the system in which case property within 
the city shall be subject to the county library tax. 
b. The governing power of a municipality may contract with 
the board of supervisors for service at a consideration to 
be fixed in the coritract. 
VI. — County law libraries, district school libraries and teachers' 

libraries may contract for service. 
VII. — In lieu of establishing a county library, the board of super- 
visors may provide by contract for the assumption of the 
functions' of a county free library by — ■ 

a. A municipal library in the county. 

b. A county library already established. 

VIII. — State librarian has general supervision, who is to visit libraries, 
call annual convention and receive annual report. 
IX. — By resolution of board of supervisors after two weeks' publica- 
tion of intention. 

Hawaii. — Area 6449 sq. mi.; pop. 255,912; counties 3. 
Law: Laws 1921, p. 80. 

I. — By board of supervisors. 

II. — Managing board of five members appointed by board of super- 
visors for two years. 
III. — a. By managing board. 

b. Certification by board of trustees of Library of Hawaii. 

c. Fixed by managing board. 

IV. — Appropriations from the territorial treasury to counties main- 
taining libraries. 
VII. — Contracts may be ma'de with an existing library for service 
to the county. 
VIII. — Library of Hawaii to assist libraries and provide for inter- 
change of books. 



28 news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 

Illinois. — Area 56,665 sq. mi. ; pop. 6,485,280 ; counties 102. 
Law: Laws of Illinois, 1919, p. 736. 

I. — On petition signed by 100 legal voters of the county, county 
commissioners or board of supervisors to submit question at 
either general or special election ; majority vote to decide. 

II. — County library board of five members appointed by county 
commissioners or board of supervisors for five-year terms. 

III.— a. By county library board. 

b. The Illinois library extension commission, consisting of the 

state librarian and two others appointed by the state 
library commission, is to approve all appointments, but 
the law makes no provision for formal certification. 

c. Fixed by county library board. 

IV. — Annual tax levy not to exceed one and one-third mills on the 
dollar to constitute separate fund, expenditures to be certi- 
fied by county librarian and approved by president of county 
library board. 

V. — The county library board may contract with existing libraries 
to act as branches or stations. 

VII. — The county commissioners or board of supervisors may con- 
tract with one existing library to establish and maintain the 
county library system. 

VIII. — The Illinois library extension commission is given power to — 

a. Approve the appointment of county librarians. 

b. Approve contracts for providing county library service by 

an existing library. 

c. Receive a copy of the annual report. 

Indiana. — Area 36,350 sq. mi.; pop. 2,930,390; counties 92. 
Law: Statutes 1917, Chap. 45; 1921, Chap. 39. 

I. — a. In counties in which no public city or town library exists. 
By voluntary action of county commissioners or by com- 
pulsory action of commissioners on petition signed by 
twenty-five freeholders in each township. 

b. In county in which public library exists. 

The library board of the public library may file with the 
county commissioners that it is willing to serve all inhab- 
itants of the county. The commissioners may, and upon 
petition of twenty-five freeholders in each township, 
must provide for such service. 

II. — a. In counties without existing library — 

Public library board appointed as follows: 

Three by the county commissioners. 

Three by the county superintendent of schools. 

Three by the judge of the circuit court. 
One member in each group is to be a woman and terms 

range from one to three years. 



Vol. 17, no. 1] SUMMARY COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS. 29 

b. In counties with existing librar}'- — 

The governing board of the existing library supplemented 
by the following representatives of the county: 

1. Two members, appointed by the county commissioners. 

2. Two members appointed by the county superintendent 

of schools. 
One member in each group must be a woman. Terms are 

for two years. 
Powers and duties : Members from county vote only on 

levying and expending county tax on matters of library 

service outside of county. 

III. — a. In counties without established library, by county library 
board; in counties with established library, the librarian 
of the established library serves as county librarian. 

c. Fixed by county library board. 

IV. — In county without existing library, not less than five-tenths of 
a mill or more than one mill on all property in county. 
In county with existing library, tax levy of not less than one- 
tenth of a mill or more than one mill on all property not 
already taxed for public library purposes. 

V. — Any city or township library may, with the consent of the county 
library board, transfer its income to the county board, which 
is thereupon to maintain the city or township library as a 
branch of the county library. 

IX. — In counties without existing library, no provisions. 

In counties with existing library, township or city libraries 
which are branches are continued as long as ten per cent of 
the inhabitants of the city or township use the county library 
through the branch. 

When less than ten per cent of the inhabitants outside a city 
in which there is a library giving county service make use of 
the service, the board of county commissioners may, at its 
discretion, discontinue the tax. 

Iowa — Area 56,025 sq. mi.; pop. 2,404,021; counties 99. 
Law : Laws of Iowa, 1913, Chap. 70, Sec. 729a. 

VII. — County libraries as such are not provided for in Iowa but are 
established by the extension by contract of city library facil- 
ities to the county. The board of trustees of any city library 
is authorized to contract with any school, corporation, 
township trustees, board of supervisors of the county in 
which the city is located or council of any city or town for 
extending service. 
The contract is to remain in force for two years unless sooner 
terminated by majority vote of the electors of such school 
corporation, township, county or city. 



30 news notes of caLieornia libraries. [January, 1922 

Kansas. — Area 82,158 sq. mi.; pop. 1,769,527; counties 105. 
Law : Statutes 1921, Chap. 152. 

I.— By voluntary action, or upon petition of 10 per cent of the tax- 
payers of the county, the board of county commissioners shall 
submit at the next general election the question of establish- 
ing a county library. A majority vote carries the propo- 
sition. 

II. — County library board of three members appointed for three- 
year terms by board of county commissioners. 

III. — a. By county library board. 

c. Fixed by county library board. 

IV. — Tax levy of not more than one-half mill on the dollar expended 
under contract of county library board. 

V. — Cities and townships maintaining libraries are not subject to 
the county library tax unless by formal action of its library 
board and city council it gives notice of desire to participate 
in the county library. 
The county may also contract with the city, township or school 
library to give service. 

VI. — The county library may contract with any school district to 
give service. 

VII. — The county library board may contract with any city or town- 
ship library within or without the county or with the county 
free library in an adjacent county for the furnishing of 
service. 

Kentucky .—Area 40,598 sq. mi. ; pop. 2,416,630 ; counties 120. 
Law: Acts 1920, p. 639. 

I. — By fiscal court of county, upon petition of twenty-five resi- 
dent freeholders of each magisterial district. 

II. — County public library board, consisting of seven members, 
two appointed 'by the fiscal court for one year; two 
appointed by the county superintendent of schools for 
two years; three appointed by the county judge for three 
years. One appointee in each group must be a woman. 

In case of contract service with existing library, the 
board of the library is to have added to it four county 
members, two appointed by the fiscal court for two years 
and two appointed by the county superintendent of schools, 
for one year and three years respectively; one member in 
each group to be a woman. 

III. — a. Appointed by county public library board, 
c. Fixed by board. 

IV. — Annual tax of not less than five-tenths of a mill and not more 
more than one mill on the dollar. 



Vol. 17, no. 1] SUMMARY COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS. 31 

V. — Library board of any existing library, with the consent of 
the county library board, may pay over its income to the 
county board on the condition that the library be main- 
tained as a branch of the county library. 

VII. — If the library board of an existing library gives its consent 
the fiscal court of the county may contract for service to 
the county by the library. 

IX. — Contract service to county by public library to cease when 
less than ten per cent of the inhabitants in the outside ter- 
ritory use the service. Service to a municipal library 
branch is discontinued when less than ten per cent of the 
inhabitants of the city use the service. 

Louisiana. — Area 48,720 sq. mi. ; pop. 1,798,509 ; counties 60. 
Law : Acts of 1918, No. 149. 

I. — Note. — In Louisiana the parish corresponds to the county and 
the police jury corresponds to the board of supervisors. 
On petition of not less than twenty-five residems of the parish, 
the police jury may pass a resolution establishing the library. 
If no protest signed by a number equal to or exceeding the 
number signing the petition is received, the jury is empow- 
ered to proceed with the establishment of the library. 

II. — Board of control consisting of not less than five nor more than 
seven members, appointed for six-year terms by the police 
jury. 

IV. — No tax limit. Expenditures of more than $500 must be first sub- 
mitted to police jury. 

Maryland. — Area 12,210 sq. mi. ■ pop. 1,449,681 ; counties 23. 
Law : Maryland Code, Act 77, Sees. 106, 107, 108, 1110-1119. 

I. — By board of county commissioners. 

II. — Board of library directors, consisting of nine members appointed 
by the board of county commissioners for six-year terms. 

III. — a. Board of library directors. 

c. Fixed by board of library directors. 

IV. — Tax of not exceeding five cents on each hundred dollars, levied 
by board of county commissioners. 

V. — No provisions in law relating to county libraries. By special 
act, city of Hagerstown is authorized to contribute $1,000 
annually to the Washington County Free Library. 

VIII. — The Maryland public library commission is authorized to pur- 
chase books to the amount of $100 and deliver to the board of 
library directors for assisting in establishing a county library. 



32 news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 

Michigan. — Area 58,915 sq. mi. ; pop. 3,668,142 ; counties 83. 
Law : Statutes 1917, Chap. 138. 

I. — By board of supervisors — no procedure prescribed. 

II. — County library board of five members appointed by the board 
of supervisors for four years ; one member to be county com- 
missioner of schools. 

If service is by contract with existing library, an advising com- 
mittee consisting of the county superintendent of schools and 
two other members, appointed by the board of supervisors 
for two-year terms. Duty of board to advise with library 
board regarding selection of books, location of branches, etc. 

III. — No provision relating to appointment, but presumably by county 
library board. 

IV. — No provision for other than library operated by contract with 
existing library, in which case a tax of not more than one- 
half mill on the dollar is to be levied. 

Minnesota. — Area 60,858 sq. mi. ; pop. 2,387,125 ; counties 86. 
Law : Session Laws 1919, Chap. 445. 

I. — By board of county "commissioners after election called upon 
petition of one hundred freeholders. 

II. — Board of five directors appointed by county commissioners. 

III. — Approved by board of library directors. 

IV. — Tax of not to exceed one mill. 

VII. — If a public library exists in a county, the board of county com- 
missioners shall contract with the library board to supply 
service. 

Missouri. — Area 69,415 sq. mi.; pop. 3,404,055 ; counties 114. 
Law: Statutes 1921, p. 461. 

I. — On petition of one hundred taxpaying citizens residing outside 
of incorporated cities maintaining library, the county court 
(which is the governing board of the county) shall submit 
the question at the next annual election. The petition asks 
that a county library district be established and that a tax 
of a specified amount, not to exceed two mills on the dollar, 
be levied. These two propositions are submitted to the voters 
separately and are carried by a majority vote. 

II. — County library board, consisting of the county superintendent 
of schools and four other members appointed for four-year 
terms. 

III. — a. By county library board. 

c. Fixed by county library board. 

IV. — Tax levy not exceeding two mills on the dollar. 



Vol. 17, no. 1] SUMMARY COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS. 33 

V. — The legislative body of an incorporated city maintaining a 
library may, with the approval of the county library board, 
notify the county court that it desires to become a part of 
the county library system. The property within the city 
thereupon becomes subject to the county library tax. The 
city may at any time give notice of its desire to withdraw. 

VII. — The county library board may contract with any public library 
or school library in the state to furnish service to the library 
district. 

VIII. — The secretary or organizer of the Missouri library commission 
is to visit all county libraries and make recommendations to 
the county library boards. 

Montana.— Area 146,080 sq. mi. ; pop. 548,889 ; counties 44. 
Law: Statutes 1915, Chap. 45; 1917, Chap. 137. 

I. — On petition of 20 per cent of the qualified voters of the county, 
one-half of whom must live outside of the county seat, the 
board of county commissioners may at its discretion estab- 
lish a county library. Notice of intention to establish must 
be published for four weeks. 

II. — Board of county commissioners. 

III. — a. Board of county commissioners. 

b. Librarian must be a graduate of a library school or have had 

one year's practical experience in library work. Employees 
whose duties require special training are to be graded and 
appointments made by examination satisfactory to the 
county librarian and county commissioners. 

c. Fixed by county board of commissioners, 

IV. — Tax of not to exceed one mill on the dollar. Bonds may be 
issued for acquisition of building. 

V. — After the establishment of the county library, the legislative 
body of any city may, after notice to the county board, with- 
draw from the county library and property within the city 
is thereafter not to be taxed. 

VI. — School libraries may become a part of the county library upon 
the transfer of their books and funds. 

VII. — The board of county commissioners may contract with the board 
in charge of any established public library in any incor- 
porated city or town for the assumption of the function of 
a county library. 

IX. — Upon petition of not less than 10 per cent of the voters in the 
county, the library may be disestablished in the same manner 
as it was established. 



3—16230 



34 news notes Of California libraries. [January, 1922 

Nebraska. — Area 77,520 sq. mi. ; pop. 1,296,372 ; counties 93. 
Law : Revised statutes of Nebraska, 1913, sees. 3792-3805. 

I. — By county board upon majority vote of electors at general 
election. 
II. — County library board of five members, appointed by county 
board for five-year terms. 

III. — a. By county library board. 

c. Salary fixed by county library board. 

IV. — Annual tax lev}* - of not more than three mills on the dollar. 

V. — Cities and townships maintaining libraries by public tax are 
exempted from the county tax. 

VI. — Any school district may at its annual meeting by a majority 
vote, contract for the use of the county library by its 
inhabitants. 

VII. — The county board may contract for the use of a public 
library already established. 

VIII. — State library commission is to give advice in formation of 
libraries and to receive copies of annual reports. 

New Jersey. — Area 8221 sq. mi.; pop. 3,155,900; counties 21. 
Law : Laws of New Jersey, 1920, p. 257. 

. I. — On petition of not less than three hundred qualiJied voters, 
the board of chosen freeholders of the county are to submit 
to the voters the question of adopting the county free 
library act for the county ; a favorable majority vote makes 
the act operative. 

II. — County library commission, consisting of five members 
appointed for five years by the board of chosen freeholders. 

III. — a. Appointed by county library commission, 
b. Fixed by commission. 

IV. — Annual tax levy of not less than one-fifth of a mill on all 
property in municipalities receiving the benefits of the act. 

V. — Any municipality maintaining a library, on application to 
the county library commission may be included in the 
county library system. 

VII. — The board of chosen freeholders may contract with any exist- 
ing library for the establishment and maintenance of a 
county library. 

New York. — Area 49,170 sq. mi.; pop. 10,384,829; counties 62. 
Law : Laws of 1921, Chap. 385. 

I. — By vote of board of supervisors, or upon a petition by twenty- 
five taxpayers, by a vote of electors. 



Vol. 17, no. 1] SUMMARY COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS. 35 

II. — County library board of five members appointed by board of 
supervisors. 

III. — a. Appointed by county library board. 

b. Certification by the regents of the University of New York. 
Libraries failing to comply with regulations can receive 

no local tax. 

c. Salary fixed by county library board. 

IV. — Tax of not less than one-third of a mill or more than one mill 
except when assessed valuation of county is less than one 
hundred million dollars, the tax shall not be less than one- 
half mill on the dollar. 

V. — Any city or town which is paying for the support of a library 
an amount equal to that which would be raised by the county 
library tax, may by vote of the electors or action of the com- 
mon council claim exemption from the tax. 

VI. — Any school district which is paying for the support of a libranr 
an amount equal to that which would be raised by the county 
library tax may by vote of the electors claim exemption from 
the tax. 

• VII. — The board of supervisors may contract for service with any free 
library registered by the regents. 

Ohio. — Area 41,060 sq. mi. ; pop. 5,759,394 ; counties 88. 
Law: Statutes 1921, Chap. 178. 

I. — On petition of 25 per cent of electors, election to be called on 
organizing county library. Majority vote to decide. 

II. — Board of five trustees, two appointed by common pleas judge 
and three by county commissioners. 

III. — Appointed by board of trustees. Certificated by state board of 
library examiners, consisting of librarians of two public 
libraries of largest circulation, director of the state library 
service and two persons chosen by the state library com- 
mission. 
Salary fixed by library trustees. 

IV. — Tax levy of from two-tenths mill to one mill. 

Oregon. — Area 96,030 sq. mi. ; pop. 783,389 ; counties 34. 
Law : Laws 1919, Chap. 357. 

I. — By resolution of the county court or board of county com- 
missioners. 

II. — Public library board of five members appointed by the county 
judge for four-year terms. 

III. — Appointed by public library board. 

Salary fixed by public library board. 



36 news notes op calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 

IV. — Tax not to exceed one-half mill; in county containing not less 
than 100,000 population, an additional tax of one-half mill 
may be levied. 
A tax not to exceed one mill on the dollar may be levied for the 
erection of library buildings. 

■V. — Any city which has not established a library may contract with 
the county library board for service. 

Any city of not less than 4000 population and expending not 
less than $2,000 on a free library, may by action of its coun- 
cil, and after publication of notice for four successive weeks, 
claim exemption from the county library tax. It shall not 
again participate in the benefits of the county library until 
such action is annulled. 

VI. — May contract with school libraries for service. 

VII. — A contract may be made with any private or public library for 
assuming the functions of a county library. 

VIII. — Annual report made to trustees of state library. 

IX. — No library shall be abolished or contract discontinued except 
by a vote at two consecutive annual meetings of the body 
establishing the library or making the contract. 

Pennsylvania. — Area 45,215 sq. mi. ; pop. 8,720,017 ; counties 67. 
Law : Pennsylvania Statutes 1920, Sees. 13761-13788. 

I. — a. County commissioners ma}', or on petition of 3 per cent 
of voters must, submit to voters question of establishing a 
library. The question of levying an annual tax is also 
submitted. 
b. If by popular subscriptions, an amount equal to or exceed- 
ing the amount raised by a two mill tax, is raised for estab- 
lishing a library, the county commissioners shall accept the 
amount and appoint a library board. Not more than 2 
per cent of the fund is to be subscribed by one firm or 
person. 

II. — Board of library directors, consisting of from five to seven 
members, as determined by the county commissioners and 
appointed by the commissioners for a term of three years. 

III. — Appointed by board of library directors. 

IV. — Annual tax not to exceed two mills on dollar. If library estab- 
lished by popular subscriptions, tax of not less than one-half 
mill and not more than two mills to be levied. If 5 per cent 
of voters petition the county commissioners, the latter must 
submit a bond issue for purchasing grounds or erecting 
buildings. 

V. — Property in municipality exempt from tax unless municipal 
authorities elect to have city joint county library, in which 
case city library is administered from county library tax. 



VOl. 17, 110. 1] SUMMARY COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS. 37 

VII. — A contract may be made with any existing nonsectarian library 
for county library service. 
Two or more counties may unite in the support of a library. 

VIII. — Annual report sent to state free library commission. 

South Dakota. — Area 77,650 sq. mi.; pop. 636,547; counties 67. 
Law : Laws 1921, Chap. 163, p. 260. 
I.- — On petition of 40 per cent of the voters of the county, signed 
in at least 60 per cent of the taxing districts of the county, 
the board of county commissioners is authorized to establish 
a county free library. 
II. — Board of county public library trustees, appointed by board of 
county commissioners, for three-year terms. County libra- 
rian is secretary of the board. 
III. — Appointed by county public library trustees. Librarian shall 
have qualifications and training as approved by state library 
commission. 
Salary fixed by county public library trustees. 
IV. — Tax rate of not to exceed one-half mill. 
VII. — County commissioners may take over control of existing public 
libraries upon conditions agreed upon between county com- 
missioners and board of library trustees. 
County commissioners may contract with one or more existing 
libraries for service. If 20 per cent or more of cost is borne 
by county, two members are to be added to the board by the 
county commissioners. 

Tennessee. — Area 42,022 sq. mi. ; pop. 2,337,885 • counties 96. 
Law : Statutes 1921, Chap. 91. 
I. — By county court, after two weeks notice. 
II. — County library board, consisting of county superintendent of 
schools and four persons elected by the board of supervisors 
of the county library, consisting of the judge and clerk of 
the county court and the mayor of the county seat. 
III. — Appointed by county library board. Certification by state board 
of library examiners, consisting of state librarian, state 
superintendent of education, librarians of four leading cities 
and president of the state library association. 
Salary fixed by county library board. 
IV.- — Tax of not over one mill. 

VI. — Municipality may become part of county library at discretion 
of governing board. 
The municipality may also contract for service. 
VII. — The county library board may contract for service with an 

existing library. 
VIII. — State librarian to have general supervision of county libraries, 
making visits and calling annual meetings of county 
librarians. 



38 news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 

Texas. — Area 265,896 sq. mi. ; pop. 4,663,228 ; counties 253. 
Law : Texas Statutes 1920, Act 1498|-14984w. 

I. — On its own initiative, or on petition of majority of voters, com- 
missioners' court is to establish library for those parts of 
county outside of cities and towns already maintaining 
libraries. 

II. — By commissioners' court. 
III. — Appointed by commissioners' court. 

Certification by state board of library examiners, consisting of: 
state librarian, librarian of state university and three other 
well trained librarians of the state appointed by the first two. 
Salary fixed by commissioners' court. 

IV. — An amount not to exceed five cents on the hundred dollars is 
to be set aside from the general tax fund for the support of 
the library. 

V. — The legislative body of a city maintaining a library may elect 
to have the city join the county library and property in the 
city shall be included in computing the amount to be set aside 
in the county library fund. After two years a city may 
withdraw. 
The commissioners' court may also contract with the legislative 
body of a city maintaining a library for service. 

VII. — Contract may be made with existing county library or public 
library for service in lieu of establishing county library. In 
the case of a public library, the librarian must secure a county 
library certificate. 
Two counties may unite in operating a joint county library. 

VIII. — State librarian to exercise general supervision over county 
libraries. 

IX. — Upon petition of majority of voters in that part of county 
maintaining county library asking for the discontinuance of 
service. 

Utah.— Area 84,990 sq. mi. ; pop. 449,396 ; counties 27. 

Law : Laws of Utah, 1919, Chap. 72. 

I. — County commissioners may, and on petition of 10 per cent of 
the taxpayers outside cities of over 20,000 must, establish 
library. 

II. — Board of directors, consisting of one county commissioner, 
mayor of the city in which the library is situated, and three 
other members appointed by county commissioners. 



Vol. 17, HO. 1] SUMMARY COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS. 39 

III. — Appointed by board of directors. 

Certificated by state board of education. 
Salary fixed by board of directors. 

IV. — Tax of not to exceed one mill on property outside of cities with 
population exceeding 20,000. Tax collected in cities main- 
taining library to be turned over to local board. 

VIII. — State board of education to have general supervision of 
libraries. 

Washington. — Area 69,180 sq. mi.; pop. 1,356,621; counties 38. 
Law: Remington's Codes and Statutes, 1915, Sec. 6980. 

VII. — The county board of commissioners is authorized to contract 
with the board of trustees of any free library for service to 
the people of the county. (Sec. 6980.) 

Note. — County libraries were provided for in 1913 by an 
amendment which inserted the word "counties" in the list 
of political subdivisions authorized to establish libraries. By 
an amendment of 1915 the word "counties" was uninten- 
tionally omitted and the legal means for establishing a county 
library withdrawn. One county library was organized under 
this law. 

Washington has a system of county circulating libraries for the 
use of the pupils of the common schools. The library is 
established and maintained by the county superintendent of 
schools and is supported by a tax not to exceed one-tenth of 
a mill. (Remington's Codes, 1915, Sees. 4592-4597.) 

West Virginia. — Area 24,170 sq. mi. ; pop. 1,463,701 ; counties 55. 
Law: West Virginia Code, Supplement, 1918, section 2494a — 2494i. 

I. County court upon majority vote of electors at election called 
either by county court or by petition of twenty per cent 
of the electors. 

II. — Board of six directors, chosen by county court for three-year 
term. 

III. — a. Appointed by directors, 
c. Fixed by directors. 

IV. — Annual tax of not more than one and one-half cents on the 
hundred dollars. 

V. — Municipalities already maintaining libraries are not subject 
to tax. 



40 news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 

Wisconsin. — Area 56,040 sq. mi. ; pop. 2,632,067 ; counties 71. 

Law : Statutes 1921, Chap. 398. 

I. — By board of supervisors (procedure not specified). 

II. — Board of directors, consisting of five members, one of whom 
must be county superintendent, who are appointed by the 
county supervisors for three-year terms. 

III. — Appointed by board of directors. 

County librarian to hold first grade certificate from public 
library certification board, consisting of two librarians and 
one public library trustee appointed by the governor, one 
member of the state library commission appointed by the 
commission and one member of the university faculty 
appointed by the president. 

Salary fixed by board of directors. 

IY. — Tax collected as other general taxes are collected, with no limit 
in the law as to the amount. 
At its option, the board of directors may assess the amount 
expended for library service in each city or town against the 
city or town which shall levy a tax to pay the amount. 
County authorized to accept gifts of buildings and sites and to 
levy tax for purchase of site. 

VI. — Any city or town may be exempted from the county library 
tax which pays for library service an amount equal to that 
which would be raised by the county tax levy. 

VII.— Contract may be made with existing library for service. If 
county of less than 150,000 appropriates an amount equal 
to one-sixth of the net income of the library, it is to appoint 
one member in addition to that provided by law. In case 
the amount exceeds one-third, the county board shall appoint 
ten members. 

Wyoming. — Area 97,890 sq. mi. ; pop. 194,402 ; counties 21. 

Law: Compiled Statutes 1920, Sees. 1563-1569; Statutes 1921, pp* 
20, 138. 

I. — When county commissioners have received proper assurances 
that a suitable place will be furnished for a public library, 
they shall levy a tax for its establishment and support. 

II. — Board of three directors appointed by county commissioners. 

III. — Appointed by board of directors. 

In counties with assessed valuation of $35,000,000 or over, libra- 
rian to receive salary of not over $2,400. 

IV. — Tax of not less than one-eighth mill or more than one-half mill. 



VOl. 17, 110. 1] SUMMARY COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAWS. 41 

V. — Upon petition of 10 per cent of the electors of a city or town, 
and a guarantee that suitable accommodation shall be pro- 
vided, the board of directors shall establish branches and 
distributing stations. 

VI. — Relative to school libraries. 

Upon petition of 10 per cent of electors in school district, board 

shall establish branch. 
In case suitable quarters are not provided at county seat, 

school authorities are to provide quarters in most available 

school building. 



42 



news notes of -CALIFORNIA libraries. [January, 1922 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA, SHOWING COUNTIES. 




"9 W 



/_ SISKIYOU | MODOC 



£}'.' / SHASTA I 

/Itbinity/ lassem 



— ' I TEHAMA ,S 



PLUMAS 



^fc, ^lala*/*/, J&, 5*Nf 



3 \ GLENN! BUTTE\/"" ; 

O ^ ! *-) vi SIERRA 

§ ; ! ,' tfV '' t**Y*»" 

0" V -'* YOLO "*- ~ ' EL D0RADO / «s 

^1 (<»™ttm ?T 'v /TUOLUMNE \ \ 

.....Sa\ _jj J* ,' -./ ,. x j MONO 

feiVs FRESNO _J ! 

Vv^\ A "S 

%A />' TULARE I 



INYO 



>, 



KERN 



f' - ~~--';-.. ! SAN BERNARDINO 

BANTA BARBARA! "\ ! 

\ Ivrwnipfc ! 



^fiatVOB' 



^VEKTURA, 



%A RIVERSIDE 
^i i —. ( ■*- 

\ *#„ 

\ O, i IMPERIAL 

33' N. _ \ *<? I 

ifcor Oiarftsnn, SC. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



LIST OP COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 



13 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 

Statistics of July 1, 1921. 



County 



Income 
l'J20-1921* 



Books, 
etc. 



» o 

CO. 



Alameda 

Amador 

Butte 

Colusa 

Contra Costa... 

Fresno 

Glenn 

Humboldt 

Imperial 

Inyo 

Kern 

Kings 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Madera 

Merced 

Modoe 

Monterey 

Napa 

Orange 

Plumas 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino. 

San Diego 

San Joaquin 

San Luis Obispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Tolo 



a 



Miss Mary Barmby 

Miss Frances M. Burket 

Miss Essae M. Culver 

Mrs Dorothy C. Worden 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck 

Miss Sarah E. McCardle 

Miss Maude Middleton 

Miss Ida M. Reagan 

Mrs Thomas B. Beeman 

Miss Anne Margrave 

Mrs Julia G. Babeock 

Miss Eleanore Kyle 

Miss Lenala Martin 

Miss Celia Gleason 

Miss Mary E. Gloek 

Miss Winifred H. Bigley 

Miss Anna L. Williams 

Miss Anne Hadden 

Miss Estella DeFord 

Miss Margaret Livingston 

Miss Carmelita Duff 

Miss Lillian L. Dickson 

Miss Cornelia D. Provines 

Mrs Ora M. Regnart 

Miss Caroline S. Waters 

Miss Eleanor Hitt 

H. 0'. Parkinson 

Miss Flo A. Gantz 

Miss Edna Holroyd 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Miss Stella Huntington 

Miss Minerva H. Waterman__ 

Not started 

Miss Thelma Brackett 

Miss Clara B. Dills 

Not started 

Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn 

Miss Edna J. Hewitt 

SMiss Elizabeth Stevens 

Miss Lila G. Dobell 

Miss Gretchen Flower 

Miss Helen Rowland 

Miss Elizabeth R. Topping... 
Miss Nancy C. Laugenour 



Sept. 26, 


1910 


June 


a, 


1919 


Sept. 


3, 


1913 


June 


8, 


1915 


July 


21, 


1913 


Mar. 


12, 


1910 


April 


8, 


1914 


May 


12, 


1914 


Feb. 


6, 


1912 


Sept. 


15, 


1913 


Nov. 


16, 


1910 


June 


4, 


1912 


Sept. 


7; 


1915 


Sept. 


5, 


1912 


May 


3, 


1910 


June 


6, 


1910 


July 


8, 


1915 


April 


6, 


1912 


Feb. 


9, 


1916 


Dec. 


9, 


1919 


Sept. 


7, 


1915 


Nov. 


8, 


1911 


Oct. 


1, 


1908 


Feb. 


4, 


1918 


July 


11, 


1913 


April 


5, 


1912 


Mar. 


7, 


1910 


July 


6, 


1915 


Sept. 


5, 


1912 


Feb. 


16, 


1910 


July 


20, 


1912 


Oct. 


13, 


1916 


May 


10, 


1917 


June 


7, 


1915 


April 


6, 


1914 


May 


11, 


1916 


Aug. 


14, 


1911 


May 


9, 


1917 


Aug. 


8, 


1916 


Sept. 


8, 


1916 


June 


10, 


1910 


July 


3, 


1917 


Apri] 


9, 


1915 


July 


12, 


1910 



$34,400 00 

5,124 57 
18,327 78 

9,522 25 
40,783 24 
106,515 10 
14,068 10 
25,041 16 
11,256 65 

8,065 5S 
61,979 17 
21,044 24 

9,317 85 
174,890 55 
24,159 13 
28,114 77 

3,295 45 
17,647 20 
10,437 50 

"~7~36JTi3~ 
11.540 76 
19.308 74 

7,070 00 
24,591 83 
27,844 68 
18.369 75 
13,243 68 

8.012 70 
15,862 37 
23,035 71 

6,890 30 



12,917 69 
16,571 E9 



22,135 52 
10.193 24 
8,272 69 
4.971 30 
30.729 62 
7.890 17 
21,916 88 
15,737 98 



O 1,'08-D 9,'19 SG5S.462 90 al,S10,074 3,659 



73,120 

4,441 
38,362 
25,395 
78,981 

207,785 
20,499 
44,604 
43,971 
16,417 

106,125 
65,275 
21,340 

292,944 
52,083 

a51,809 
6,407 
43,728 
6,805 

"l9"314" 



14,660 
11,317 
59.577 
66,731 



17,013 
19.S28 


56,986 





73 
20 
97 
54 
93 

198 
82 

150 
66 
44 

151 
69 
76 

317 
64 
74 
14 

149 
61 

~~67 

68 

95 

58 

138 

143 

75 

72 

52 

124 

100 

83 



41 
70 
36 
60 

170 
47 

111 
50 
31 

114 
48 
44 

204 
50 
76 



31 
81 
84 
33 
80 
121 
95 
93 
40 
74 
90 
57 



46,542 

32,909 



120 
64 



37,313 
20,729 
21,410 
14,046 
63,925 
20,971 
33,567 
50,145 



62 
52 
72 
56 
136 
54 
67 
79 



67 
35 
62 
23 
139 
32 
60 
48 



2,920 2,101 



29 
8 
61 
30 
51 

135 
40 
89 
52 
28 
88 
38 
42 

132 
47 
55 
13 
64 
38 

"~31 
37 

T9 
35 
67 
80 
30 
58 
24 
60 
75 



50 



36 
31 
55 

23 
57 
24 
47 
46 



*The income as given does not include balance in fund July 1, 1920. 
ISueceeded Mrs Geraldine Work, Jan. 16, 1922. 



44 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



Only those California libraries are listed for which there were news items. For 
complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1921. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Area, 158,297 sq. miles. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 3,426,536. 

Assessed valuation, $4,555,445,447. 

Number of counties, 58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 
County seat, Oakland. 
Area, S40 sq. mi. Pop. 344,127. 
Assessed valuation $314,044,299 (tax- 
able for county $274,852,032). 

Alameda Co. Feee Libbaey, Oakland. 
Miss Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

Several trips were made by the County 
Librarian with the Home Demonstration 
Agent to Center meetings. In one com- 
munity where the Center meeting was 
held, there was no County Library 
branch and the librarian found that some 
of the people were anxious for reading 
so a branch was promised for the near 
future. At another Center the County 
branch is used as the meeting place. 
The house used for the library has sev- 
eral rooms, one of which the librarian 
does not use, so this has been turned 
over to the women and they are fur- 
nishing it for their present meeting 
place. The County Library has also 
given them a shelf of special books for 
that room. These are books that deal 
entirely with the subjects they are work- 
ing over. 

The University Library school class, 
that portion of it especially interested 
in county library work, has begun its 
practice work in the County Library 
office here. They are a fine lot of girls 
and the librarians of the state will be 
glad to see them graduate. 

During the quarter branches were . es- 
tablished in the Eureka and Townsend 
school districts. The former is a three 
teacher, the latter a one teacher school. 
Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 

Alameda. 

§|| Alameda Free Public Libbaey. 
Mrs Marcella H. Krauth, Lib'n. 

The West End Branch has been thor- 
oughly renovated — painted, papered, etc. 
A new case for the accommodation of 
more books has been added. 464 addi- 
tional books have been moved there from 
the main library, making a total of 1297 
volumes at the branch. 

Children's Book Week Avas celebrated 
as usual. Displays of books, posters and 
lists, as well as stories suitable to the 
occasion, made up the program. The at- 
tendance was large and many new 
patrons were added to the library. 

The average circulation within the past 
three months has been the largest in the 
history of the library. 

Maecella H. Krauth, Lib'n. 

Berkeley. 

||§Berkeley [Free] Public Library. 
Carlton B. Joeckel, Lib'n. 

A general civil service ordinance has 
been passed by the Berkeley City Coun- 
cil. After careful consideration by the 
committee which proposed the measure, 
as well as by the Council, it was decided 
to exempt the Public Library from the 
provisions of the ordinance. The Chair- 
man of the Civil Service Committee was 
Mr Paul Eliel, Director of the San Fran- 
cisco Bureau of Municipal Research. 

During Children's Book Week, the 
Children's Department of the library 
(Miss lone Tucker, Children's Libra- 
rian) co-operated actively with the three 
local bookstores. In each store there was 
a special display of books selected by 
the Children's Librarian. In addition, 
a large department store gave over two 
show windows to a selected display of 
juvenile literature. In all of these ex- 
hibits, the library used the Thomas 
Bailey Aldrich bookcases as described by 
the Children's Book Week Committee. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



45 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 
Six of these bookcases were made by pu- 
pils in the Junior High Schools of the 
city. 

Two members of the 1922 class of the 
University of California Library School 
have been doing practice work in the 
library during the Christmas holidays. 

The circulation of books during the 
last six months of 1921 showed an in- 
crease of 15 per cent over the same sis 
months of 1920. 

The library maintained a temporary 
branch in a booth at the Berkeley Cham- 
ber "of Commerce Manufacturers' and 
Merchants' Fair, August 15-19. The 
booth, designed by a local architect, sug- 
gested the lines of a Greek temple ; red 
geraniums supplied a holiday touch. 
Book cases were filled with attractive 
books and labeled Home-making, Trades, 
Better Business, Travel, Biographies, 
etc. One case was devoted to books of 
fiction and another to children's books. 
Current magazines were provided at two 
small reading tables. Stories for the 
children were told each afternoon to a 
group assembled by the attendant in 
charge. Three charts on a large bulletin 
board effectively showed the growth of the 
Library and the need for a larger build- 
ing. These charts were carefully studied 
by several who came to the booth. A 
library assistant was in attendance at 
all times to loan books, to accept appli- 
cations for membership, and to welcome 
visitors and tell them about the library. 
The actual work of a Loan Desk was 
done here ; books were loaned to be re- 
turned later to the library, and requests 
were filed for books to be reserved and 
for special subjects to be looked up. 
Comments of visitors were varied and 
interesting. One man charged the li- 
brary with buying many books which 
people would be better off without ; he 
himself, in order to be on the safe side, 
did not borrow any books from the 
library. Comparatively few who were 
not already acquainted with the library 
came to taste our wares, but the Fair 
crowd, as it passed our way, saw that 
the library was there — one of the activi- 
ties of Berkeley. 

Carlton B. Joeckel, Lib'n. 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

Newman Club Library. W. H. Con- 
lin, Chairman Library Committee. 

Miss Margaret D. Bloomer is no 
longer Librarian at the Newman Club 
Library. 

Eureka School Dist. 
Eureka School Dist. Branch, 
Alameda Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

Livermore. 

Livermore Union High School Li- 
brary. Herbert Lee, Prin. Miss Minnie 
R. Snorin, Lib'n. 

Our library has been improved this 
year by a gift from the local parlor, 
N. S. G. W., of Dr Chapman's History 
of California (The Spanish period) and 
by a gift of $125 from Architect H. H. 
Meyers of San Francisco for books to 
add to our supplementary reading lists. 
We hope to cultivate the reading habit 
among our students by having attractive 
books at hand on our shelves for their 
use. Herbert Lee, Prin. 

Oakland. 

§|| Oakland Free [Pcblic] Library. 
Chas. S. Greene, Lib'n. 

Mr Wm. G. Eggleston has been ap- 
pointed as Library Director to fill the 
unexpired term of Mr D. W LaFortune, 
who resigned in August. 

The gift of more than $800 from the 
Vernon-Rcckridge Improvement Club for 
books for the Rockridge Branch has pur- 
chased 553 volumes divided as follows : 
fiction, 120 volumes ; juvenile, 232 vol- 
umes ; classed books, circulating 136 vol- 
umes, reference 15 volumes. October 21 
to 31 was designated as ''Gift Book 
Week" at the Rockridge Branch. The 
Rockridge Men's Club managed the ap- 
peal for books, and the other organiza- 
tions co-operated with them. The idea 
was to give a book one had enjoyed and 
in return, enjoy books given by one's 
neighbors. Over 700 books were added 
to the Branch collection as a result. 

Mr Henry Root has presented the li- 
brary and branches with fifteen copies of 
his book, "Henry Root — Personal his- 
tory and reminiscences". This is not the 
first time Mr Root has shown his gener- 



46 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued, 
osity to the library. He will be remem- 
bered as the donor of the lot for the 
23d Avenue Branch and, with Mr J. R. 
Talcott, the lot for Melrose. He has 
also presented the Melrose Branch with 
a file of the U. S. Supreme Court De- 
cisions. 

The Garfield Civic Association pre- 
sented the 23d Avenue Branch with the 
gift of a piano and $34 to be spent for 
children's books. Mrs Olive Lathrop 
presented the Dimond Branch with $25 
to be spent for children's books. Mrs E. 
Gedon has presented the Golden Gate 
Branch with two beautiful flags to be 
placed in the auditorium of the branch. 

Miss Josephine DeWitt was added to 
the Substitute Staff in October. Miss 
Ethel L. Pratt resigned her position as 
bookmender in October to be married. 
Miss Harriet Mincher has been appoint- 
ed to fill the vacancy. Miss Josephine 
Jenkinson has been appointed assistant 
at Dimond, vice Miss Katharine I. Gray, 
who was transferred to East Oakland. 
Miss F. M. Van Gaasbeek, Cataloger, re- 
turned November 29 from a three months 
trip to the East. She reports visiting 
many libraries, and was in Washington 
at the time of the Armistice Day cele- 
bration. 

The Directors have determined to start 
what will grow into a full-sized branch 
at Allendale, and have arranged for the 
leasing of a building at 2870 38th 
Avenue from Mr George MacDonald for 
the purpose. The fitting up is to be 
undertaken and the deposit can be moved 
to the new location soon after the first 
of January. 

The lease with Mr E. J. Saake for 
the Piedmont premises has been renewed 
for three years at an increased rental. 

The Reference Department is often 
asked for some manufacturer's catalog, 
describing a certain product, or for in- 
formation to be found only in such cata- 
logs. We have long realized the need 
for a collection of trade catalogs in the 
library, but have only recently begun 
the work of assembling the material. 
Five hundred request postals were 
printed and of these 400 have already 
been mailed to leading manufacturers 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Oakland — Continued, 
all over the United States. The response 
has been most generous. Catalogs of all 
descriptions are now pouring in, most of 
them accompanied by courteous letters. 
A plan for indexing and arranging the 
material is now being worked out by the 
reference department. 

The second number of our "Municipal 
Bulletin"' (Quarterly) was distributed, 
early in December, to the offices in the 
City Hall. Like the first, it was a list 
of current material, books, pamphlets 
and magazine articles, on topics of in- 
terest to city officials and employees. 
The library staff had a Christmas card 
designed and. hand colored and sold over 
500 cards at 10 cents apiece for the bene- 
fit of the children committed to the Asso- 
ciated Charities. 

Mr H. A. Snow has returned from 
Africa to New York, bringing nine tons 
more of specimens with him. Upon his 
return to Oakland, probably within a 
few days, active campaign will be made 
for a suitable building to house the collec- 
tion. 

At the request of the Health Depart- 
ment a questionnaire was sent to the 
public libraries of the 68 largest cities 
of the United States, asking their meth- 
ods of handling books that have been in 
contact with contagious diseases. A tab- 
ulation of the answers is as follows : 



Destroyed or sent to 
contagious wards— 

Smalipox destroyed 
others fumigated— 

Fumigated 

Destroyed it handled 
by patient; other- 
wise fumigated 

Not fumigated 

Board of Health de- 
cides 

No record kept ; when 
known fumigate 

Not permitted to use 
library when known 



33 



*27 
3 



Methods of fumigation: 

Formaldehyde 7 

Sunlight 7 

Formalin 2 

*In some cases not considered contagious. 

Chas. S. Gbeene, Lib'n. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



47 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Townsend School Dist. 
Townsend School Dist. Branch, 
Alameda Co. Feee Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 

County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 243. 
Assessed valuation $S12,937 (taxable 
for county $717,061). 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class). 
County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 7793. 
Assessed valuation $6,925,588 (taxable 
for county $5,965,035). 

Amador Co. Free Library, Jackson. 
Miss Frances M. Burner, Lib'n. 

Charleston Union School District and 
Clinton School District joined the County 
Free Library during December. 

Miss Freda Riedinan, custodian of the 
Pine Grove Branch, is attending the San 
Francisco State Teachers' College. Dur- 
ing her absence, Mrs Agnes Luclekens 
will be in charge of the library. 

Frances M. Burket, Lib'n. 

Charleston Union School Dist. 

Charleston Union School Dist. 
Branch, Amador Co. Free Library, 
was established in December, 1921. 

Clinton School Dist. 
Clinton School Dist. Branch, 
Amador Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in December, 1921. 

Pine Grove (No exp. office) . 

Pine Grove Branch, Amador Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Amador Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Waterman. 

Treston School of Industry Li- 
brary. O. H. Close. Supt. Mrs Nelly 
Latham Snyder, Lib'n. 

Since my arrival, we have ordered 
nearly $1000 worth of fiction and non- 



AMADOR CO — Continued. 
Waterman — Continued, 
fiction books. A large portion of the 
library has been re-catalogued. 

In this library I also do the censoring 
of the Cadets' mail and packages, and 
we average 3100 letters and 350 pack- 
ages per month, and an accurate type- 
written data is kept of each. 

The books are charged out to the 
Cadets, and sent weekly in boxes to them 
to their respective companies. 

This is the first time in the state that 
a trained librarian has been installed 
in a penal institution library, and it has 
met with gratifying success. 

Nelly Latham Snyder, Lib'n. 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second class.) 
County seat, Oroville. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 30,030. 
Assessed valuation $43,305,07S (taxable 
for county $35,863,709). 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville. 
Miss Essae M. Culver, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were es- 
tablished at Humboldt Road, Nelson and 
Richvale. 

Essae M. Culver, Lib'n. 

Chico. 

Chico High School Library. James 
Ferguson, Prin. 

The Chico High School is planning to 
move to its new and commodious building 
about March first, and as it is to have 
a more workable library than it has been 
able to have in its present crowded 
quarters, work has already begun to col- 
lect the equipment necessary for such 
a library. 

James Ferguson, Prin. 

Humboldt Road (P. O. Chico, R. R. 2, 
Box 7A). 
Humboldt Road Branch, Butte Co. 
Free Library, was established October 
10, 1921. 

Nelson. 
Nelson Branch, Butte Co. Free 
Library, was established October 12, 
1921. 



48 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



BUTTE CO.— Continued. 
Richvale. 
Richvale Branch, Butte Co. Fbee 
Library, was established October 7, 1921. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth class.) 
County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 990 sq. mi. Pop. 6183. 
Assessed valuation $8,587,433 (taxable 
for county $7,618,065). 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

(Forty-second class.) 
County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 10S0 sq. mi. Pop. 9290. 
Assessed valuation $24,200,735 (taxable 
for county $20,639,483). 

Colusa Co. Free Library, Colusa. 
Mrs Dorothy C. Worden, Lib'n. 

An exhibit of books for children and 
books suitable for Christmas gifts was 
placed in the Public Library in Colusa 
November 22, and remained there till 
Christmas. The County Librarian gave 
a short review of the newer books before 
the Woman's Improvement Club October 
11, and on the day the Christmas Ex- 
hibit was begun, placed the books in the 
Club room and discussed the various edi- 
tions of children's classics. Considerable 
interest was shown in the book exhibit. 

The County Library has rented a small 
room in the Central Service Station in 
Arbuckle, and the Arbuckle Branch Li- 
brary was moved from the Hotel to this 
room, December 22. A chair and table 
have been donated by interested organi- 
zations, and later a table will be built 
by the manual training classes at the 
school. Miss Margaret Howard has been 
appointed custodian, the branch to b& 
open to the public Monday and Thurs- 
day from 7 to 9 p.m. and Tuesday and 
Saturday from 3 to 5 p.m. 

The College City Branch was moved 
December 22 to a large light room in the 
Hoffman building across from tbe Roche- 
dale store, on Main street. The south 
room of the building has been rented 
by the County, and gives ample space for 
an attractive reading room. The Com- 
mercial Club of College City and the 



COLUSA CO.— Continued. 
Colusa — Continued. 

Dance Committee have each donated $25 
to be used in renovation and furnishing. 
Mrs Winona Betterton is still to be in 
charge, the library also being open 
Thursday night from 7 to 9 as well as 
Wednesday and Saturday from 2 to 5. 
The High School class is to build a 
table and benches for the library. 

Spring Valley school joined the County 
Library November 18, 1921. Tbis makes 
Colusa a unit in service to schools. 
There is however no teacher at present 
at Spring Valley, the one that was there 
having left. Freshwater school is also 
without a teacher at present, the last 
one having just married. 

Circulation statistics for the past six 
months show that 21,042 books were 
issued to the people of the county. 4664 
books were sent out to schools during the 
past term ; 50 sets of stereographs ; 47 
phonograph records ; 72 maps ; 6 globes 
and 169 pictures. 

All the branches and the schools with 
the exception of seven were visited dur- 
ing the past three months — some of them 
several times. 

Dorothy C. Worden, Lib'n. 

Colusa Co. Law Library, Colusa. 
Judge Ernest Weyand, in charge. 

The remodeling and repairs in the 
Court House at Colusa, have been com- 
pleted within the last three months. The 
rooms heretofore occupied by the law li- 
brary, have been thrown into one room, 
and the shelving has all been rearranged, 
and made uniform. The library is now 
placed in good orderly arrangement. The 
Colusa County Law Library contains 
the Reporter-System (excepting the New 
York Supplement), the Federal Reporter, 
and LT. S. Reports ; the Federal Statutes, 
and Digests ; the entire lot of Annotated 
Reports beginning with the American 
Decisions, and ending with the last vol- 
ume of the A. L. R. ; Century Digest 
and the continuations to date ; Cyclope- 
dia of Law and Procedure and Corpus 
Juris ; Ruling Case Law ; Encyclopedia 
of Procedure and Practice ; California 
and California Appellate, Kerr's Digest, 
and California Jurisprudence, and a large 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



49 



COLUSA CO.— Continued. 
Colusa — Continued, 
number of late textbooks. Large labels 
have been printed, indicating in a gen- 
eral way the books in each section, so 
that one at a glance may get his bear- 
ings upon entering the library. The li- 
brary room is well lighted, well heated 
and ventilated, and is in every way ar- 
ranged for the convenience of the mem- 
bers of the bar, and the public. Colusa 
County can well be proud of the Colusa 
County Law Library. 

Ernest Weyand. 

Arbuckle. 

Arbuckle Branch, Colusa Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

College City. 

College City Branch, Colusa Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Colusa. 

Colusa Free Public Library and 
Branch, Colusa Co. Free Library. 
Miss Belle Crane, Lib'n. 

See note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Spring Valley School Dist. (P. O. 
Williams). 

Spring Valley School Dist .Branch, 
Colusa Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished November IS, 1921. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 
County seat, Martinez. 
Area, 750 sq. mi. Pop. 53,889. 
Assessed valuation $S7,374,877 (tax- 
able for county $79,038,745). 

Contra Costa Co. Free Library, 
Martinez. Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck, 
Lib'n. 

Talks on children's books were given 
at Crockett before the Contra Costa 
County Federation of Women's Clubs, 
and at Saranap before the Parent-Teach- 
er's Association. In each place an ex- 
hibit of choice books was taken. v An ex- 



CONTRA COSTA CO.— Continued. 

M arti nez — Continued. 

Libit of books was maintained in the 

county library offices until Christmas 

time. 

In October Miss Fern Woods passed 
an examination for junior assistant and 
was appointed to the position left vacant 
by the resignation of Mrs Heine Cortes. 

The county librarian went to Sacra- 
mento in November and told stories in 
the public library as an ending of 
Children's Week. 

Miss Eleanor Stephens of Yakima, 
Washington, visited the library in Oc- 
tober and spent two days in the office and 
a third in making a county trip with 
Mrs Whitbeck. 

In the October, 1921, News Notes of 
California Libraries, Mr P. C. Bickel 
should have been given as the principal 
of San Ramon Valley Union High 
School at Danville. The new custodian 
at Oleum Branch is T. M. Phillips. The 
post office of Associated Branch is Asso- 
ciated, but its express office is Avon. 
Alice G. Whitbeck, Lib'n. 

Associated (Exp. Avon). 

Associated Branch, Contra Costa 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under Contra Costa Co. Free 
Library. 

Brentwood. 

Brentwood Branch, Contra Costa 
Co. Free Library. 

The Brentwood Library Association 
has purchased a lot from the Balfour 
Guthrie Company for $500. The site 
will be used by the Library Association 
for a new building. — Martinez Gazette, 
O IS 

Danville. 

San Ramon Valley Union High 
School Library and Branch. Contra 
Costa Co. Free Library. P. C. Bickel, 
Prin. 

Sec note under Contra Costa Co. Free 
Library. 

Oleum. 

Oleum Branch, Contra Costa Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Contra Costa Co. Free 
Library. 



4—16230 



50 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



CONTRA COSTA CO.— Continued. 
Richmond. 

Richmond [Feee] Public Libbaey. 
Miss Norah McNeill, Lib'n. 

Several changes are being made on 
the staff in the near future. Miss Doro- 
thy Squires, a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of California Library School, will 
succeed Mrs Gerda Behrens. Mrs Lillian 
Cole will have charge of the Stege 
Branch, relieving Mrs Florilla Brown. 
No successor has been appointed to Miss 
Marion Rownd, the children's librarian, 
who gives up her work at the beginning 
of the year. — Richmond Independent, 
D 16 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

( Fifty-fourth class. ) 
County seat, Crescent City. 
Area, 1546 sq. mi. Pop. 2759. 
Assessed valuation $9,453,336 (taxable 
for county $9,41S,286). 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Placerville. 
Area, 1S91 sq. mi. Pop. 6426. 
Assessed valuation $11,81)5,740 (taxable 
for county $10,251,830). 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 
County seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5696 sq. mi. Pop. 128,779. 
Assessed valuation $188,332,264 (tax- 
able for county $161,432,260). 

tFKESNO Co. Feee Lidbaby, Fbesno. 
Miss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 

Barstow Colony Branch was re-opened 
the first of November, with Miss M. 
Cuthill in charge. The branch is located 
in the community hall and has been fitted 
up with shelves and furniture. A new 
branch has been opened in the Webstei 
school house and is used by the commu- 
nity. Mr Harold Hughes, principal of 
the school, is custodian and keeps the 
library open two days a week. Though 
it has been in operation only a month 
the report is very good indeed and we 
hope for a large branch in this locality. 
The community around the Miramonte 
school has long been served from the 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 

Fresno — Continued. 

school, but we have now moved this 

branch into a room in the store and 

Mrs Sarah Blythe is in charge. 

Three elementary schools and one high 
school have come into the county library 
this quarter and we are having inquiries 
from another high school. The books in 
the Selma High School have been listed, 
preparatory to cataloging them and we 
are anticipating an interesting year with 
this, the largest high school outside of 
Fresno City. 

Miss Helen Downs has been granted 
an indefinite leave of absence owing to ill 
health. Miss Ellen Miller, Miss Annie 
Wilson and Miss K. Dorothy Ferguson 
have been added to the staff. Miss Mil- 
ler is in the Branch Department, Miss 
Wilson in the Catalog Department and 
Miss Ferguson has taken Miss Harris's 
position during her absence in the east. 
Miss Elizabeth Ashman, assistant in the 
the Branch Department, was married 
December 31 to Mr William Vlier. She 
will make her home in Fresno. 

Sabah E. McCaedle, Lib'n. 

Barstow Colony (P. O. Fresno, R. R. 
K, Box 178; exp. Fresno). 

Babstow Colony Beanch, Fbesno 
Co. Feee Libeaby. 

See note under Fresno Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Big Sandy School Dist., Emergency 
School (P. O. Auberry; no exp. 
office). 

Big Sandy School Dist. Emeegency 
School Beanch, Fbesno Co. Feee Li- 
beaby, was established in October, 1921. 

Centerville School Dist. (P. O. Sanger, 
R. R. A, Box 64; exp. Sanger). 
Centebville School Dist. Beanch, 
Fbesno Co. Feee Libeaby, was estab- 
lished November 5, 1921. 

Fresno. 

Ii Fees no High School Libeaby. 
Delbert Brunton, Prin. Miss Dorotha 
Davis, Lib'n. 

Fresno High School Library is now 
in the new high school building. 'We 
have a large reading room, about 130 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



California state library. 



51 



FRESNO CO.— Continued. 
Fresno — Continued, 
feet long. Our stacks are all in one end 
of the room and the charging desk divides 
the room. However, we have more books 
than stacks now. The librarian has an 
office and work room, which she appre- 
ciates very much. 

We have 1325 pupils and 79 on the 
faculty. Our books number 6500 and 
magazines 68. We take four Sunday 
papers and one daily. 

Dorotha Davis, Lib'n. 

Lerona School (P. O. Auberry; no exp. 
office). 

Lerona School Branch, Fresno Co. 
Free Library, was established Novem- 
ber 1, 1921. 

Lerona is an emergency school, the 
school district having not yet been 
formed. 

Miramonte (P. O. Dunlap; exp.> Dun- 
lap via Sanger). 
Miramonte Branch, Fresno Co. 
Free Library, was established Decem- 
ber 9, 1921. 

Selma. 

Selma Union High School Library. 
J. K. McKillop, Prin. Edith Wells, Li- 
brarian. 

The Selma Union High School has re- 
cently joined the Fresno County Free 
Library. In ordering books for this year 
special attention has been directed toward 
building up the reference library for the 
English Department ; last year attention 
was given toward building up a refer- 
ence library for the Science Department. 
The library is under supervision of a 
teacher each period of the day. 

Edith Wells, Lib'n. 

See also note under Fresno Co. Free 
Library. 

Webster (P. O. and exp. Fresno Co. 
Free Library). 
Webster Branch, Fresno Co. Free 
Library, was established December 1, 
1921. 



GLENN COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Willows. 
Area, 1460 sq. mi. Pop. ll,Su3. 
Assessed valuation $27,603,956 (taxable 
for county $23,866,418). 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows. 
Miss Maude Middleton, Lib'n. 

Miss Valeria Magnenat has been ap- 
pointed as acting librarian in Orland 
while Miss Elsie Trimble is on leave of 
absence on account of illness. 

Mrs Dorothy H. Brenton, first assist- 
ant in the County Free Library, submit- 
ted her resignation to become effective 
December 21. 

A request has been received from the 
Monroeville Orchards for the establish- 
ment of a branch library. The demand 
is for material on horticulture and farm 
machinery in addition to the general 
reading. 

The County Library played its part 
in the annual county fair at Orland. An 
attempt was made to suggest to the 
people of the county, by a small but 
balanced collection, the range of the re- 
sources of the County Library. Many 
posters were made for the exhibit and 
in this way subject material was adver- 
tised. Many people visited the booth and 
left requests for specific subject material. 
Requests have been mailed to us often, 
since that .time, reminding us that the 
books had been seen in the booth. 
Maude Middleton, Lib'n. 



Monroeville Orchards (P. O. and exp. 
Hamilton City). 
Monroeville Orchards Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 6, 1921. 



Orland. 

Orland Free Library and Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library. Elsie M. 
Trimble, Lib'n. 

See note under Glenn Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



52 



news notes of calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class)-. 
County seat, Eureka. 
Area, 3507 sq mi. Pop. 37,413. 
Assessed valuation $42,560,904 (tax- 
able for county $38,969,254). 

Humboldt Co. Feee Library, Eureka. 
Miss Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

Branches were established during the 
quarter in Banner and Bay school dis- 
tricts. 

Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

Banner School Dist. (P. O. Beatrice; 
no exp. office). 
Banner School Dist. Branch, 
Humboldt Co. Free Library, was es- 
tablished November 18, 1921. 

Bay School Dist. (P. O. Areata). 

Bay School Dist. Branch, Hum- 
boldt Co. Free Library, was established 
October 31, 1921. 

Eureka. 

Eureka High School Library. 
George C. Jensen, Prin. Miss Kathleen 
Hacker, Lib'n. 

We are subscribing to 29 periodicals 
and 1 newspaper this year. 

The organization of the library was 
begun in August, 1921. It is the first 
year this school has had a certificated 
librarian. 

Kathleen Hacker, Lib'n. 



IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 
County seat, El Centre 
Area, 4316 sq. mi. Pop. 43,383. 
Assessed valuation $47,510,133 (taxable 
for county $40,580,941). 

Imperial Co. Free Library, El Cen- 
tro. Mrs Thomas B. Beeman, Lib'n. 

Mrs F. J. Staetzel has succeeded Mrs 
Copeland as custodian at the Seeley 
Branch. Material is to be addressed to 
Box 181, Seeley. 

Mrs Thomas B. Beeman, Lib'n. 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 
Imperial. 

Imperial [Free] Public Library 
and Branch, Imperial Co. Free Li- 
brary. Mrs D. W. Hatch, Lib'n. 

I am glad to report an increase in the 
circulation and attendance for the past 
three months. The work with the 
schools is especially gratifying. Reading 
classes from fourth to eighth grades 
came by classes to the library "Book 
Week" for special talks on "Our library 
and the books." I also spoke before the 
P. T. A. and the Class in English Litera- 
ture at the High School, the Girl Re- 
serves and the College Women's Club 
for Educational Week, and was asked to 
repeat my paper, given at the C. W. C, 
at the El Centro P. T. A. 

Jessie H. Hatch, Lib'n. 



Seeley. 

Seeley Branch, Imperial Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Imperial Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

INYO COUNTY. 

( Forty-seventh class. ) 
County seat, Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 7031. 
Assessed valuation $17,033,180 (taxable 
for county $10,623,319). 

Inyo Co. Free Library, Independ- 
ence. Miss Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

The county librarian attended the 
Teachers' Institute at Bishop, December 
1 to 3,. using the time to become ac- 
quainted with the teachers and their 
wants. She addressed the Institute 
briefly on the subject of the schools' use 
of the county library. 

Several custodians have called at the 
office during the quarter : Miss Robinson, 
from Big Pine, Mrs Best, from Bishop, 
Mrs Hildreth, from Manzanar, Miss Wil- 
son, from Cartago, and Mrs Linde, from 
Keeler. And we had a call from the 
husband of the Shoshone custodian — 
C. W. Brown, who came in while on 
a hurried, visit to the county seat, which 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



53 



INYO CO.— Continued. 
Independence — Continued, 
he can make either by a six hundred 
mile trip by rail, or two days across the 
desert by "flivver." He had chosen the 
flivver route this time. 

The county library moved from its 
very cramped quarters in the Norman 
Hotel Annex to the new courthouse, 
December 19. The room assigned to the 
library, although in the basement, is prac- 
tically on the ground level, is warm and 
well lighted. While it contains three 
times the space formerly occupied by 
the library, it was obviously inadequate, 
and we were given the use of an adjoin- 
ing room for our school collection, maga- 
zines, packing, etc. This should suffice 
for some years' growth. The library was 
furnished, with the rest of the courthouse, 
in handsome and substantial oak for 
tables, desks and chairs, Avhile the 
shelves and other fixtures are of steel. 

On the evening of January 2, Mr 
James Ferriss, the reformer and natur- 
alist, spoke at the library on civic im- 
provement. The room was well filled 
with interested listeners. 

Miss Ella Wilson, custodian at Car- 
tago, was married December 17, to Wal- 
ter E. Bramlett. Her place is taken by 
her mother, Mrs Olive P. Wilson. TBe 
branch will continue to be kept in the 
company store and post office. Miss 
Elsie Mayo, custodian at Owenyo, left 
January 15 for Los Angeles. Mrs E. A. 
Shelton will take up the work. Mrs 
P. J. Sanders has been appointed custo- 
dian at Coso, in the place of F. B. 
Adams, who has sold his interests there. 
Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

To convert a small branch library, con- 
sisting of two rooms, into a kitchen and 
banquet hall, set a table for 28 persons, 
serve a game breakfast, and have the 
rooms restored to their every-day condi- 
tion between the hours of seven and ten 
in the morning was the "stunt" which 
the Bishop Business Women's Club 
undertook during a recent visit of Mrs 
Fitzgerald. State President of the Cali- 
fornia Federation of Women's Clubs, 
Mrs U r q u h art, President of the Los 
Angeles District Federation, and Mrs 



INYO CO.— Continued. 

Bishop — Continued. 

Hession, President of the Inyo County 
Federation. 

The idea was suggested by a picnic 
luncheon given at the library November 
10 by the club when the members brought 
their own lunches and the custodian of 
the branch served coffee. During the 
luncheon a program made up of the maga- 
zine comments on Limitation of Arms 
Conference at Washington was given and 
the event having proved both novel and 
entertaining, the game breakfast was 
decided upon. The Sierra Rainbow Club, 
an organization made up of the follow- 
ers of Ike Walton, offered to furnish the 
quail and rabbit for the event and the 
rest of the menu consisted of tomatoes, 
hot rolls, coffee and doughnuts. A long 
table was set in the large reading room 
and was appropriately decorated with 
sage brush, pine cones and red apples. The 
place cards, done by one of the members 
of the club, were hand-painted ducks with 
outspread wings. They were attached 
to the tops of the water glasses and gave 
the effect of being in full flight around 
the table. The favors, designed by the 
same artist, were small handpainted quail 
standing by each plate and gazing down 
into small nests filled with pine nuts. 

When the guests of honor arrived they 
were ushered through the small reading 
room where the committee in charge was 
busily getting service plates, salad, and 
butter ready on the charging desk, which 
had been converted into a very handy 
serving table. On the same tables 
used during library hours by juvenile 
readers, electric percolaters were sending 
out clouds of steam from fragrant coffee. 
And in a nearby restaurant the quail and 
rabbit were done to a turn and waiting 
a signal to be rushed to the library, 
piping hot. 

At the end of the breakfast the guests 
were called upon for brief speeches and 
then each member of the club gave a 
toast to her job. Though these toasts 
were sometimes only a sentence and were 
serious or humorous and as fancy dic- 
tated, the truly democratic spirit of the 
club shone forth and as one member 
afterwards said, "It was like an old 



54 



news notes OF California libraries. [January, 1922 



INYO CO.— Continued. 
Bishop — Continued, 
fashioned experience meeting." This club 
is made up of business women from all 
walks in life and of all ages from 17 
to 70. 

Mes B. T. Best, 
Custodian, Bishop Branch. 

Big Pine. 

Big Pine Branch, Inyo Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Inyo Co. Free Library. 

Bishop. 

Bishop Branch, Inyo Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Inyo Co. Free Library. 

Cartago. 

Cartago Branch, Inyo Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Inyo Co. Free Library. 

Coso (P.O. Little Lake; no exp. office). 

Coso Branch, Inyo Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Inyo Co. Free Library. 

Keeler. 

Keeler Branch, Inyo Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Inyo Co. Free Library. 

Manzanar. 

Manzanar Branch, Inyo Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Inyo Co. Free Library. 

Owenyo. 

Owenyo Branch, Inyo Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Inyo Co. Free Library. 



KERN COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 
County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area, 8159 sq. mi. Pop. 54,843. 
Assessed valuation $186,312,776 (tax- 
able for county $163,211,137). 

Kern Co. Free Library. Bakersfield. 
Mrs Julia G. Babeoek, Lib'n. 

Mrs Jennie C. Engell accepted a posi- 
tion in this library as head of the cir- 
culation department, December 19, 1921. 



KERN CO. — Continued. 
Bakersfield — Continued. 
Mrs Engell was formerly head of the 
circulation department in the Tacoma 
Public Library, and was later librarian 
of the Panama Canal Zone, where she 
organized the public library service. 
Miss Mabel West, formerly librarian of 
the Oregon Normal School, is with us 
temporarily, due to her interest in form- 
ing an acquaintance with county library 
work in California. 

A school for the children of migratory 
laborers provided for by the State of 
California was opened at the Hoover 
Farm near Wasco, in October, for the 
cotton pickers. Before the arrival of 
the teacher or the equipment, Miss 
Georgiana Carden, State Supervisor of 
Attendance, came in to tell of the plans 
and to ask the cooperation of the li- 
brary. The librarian was delighted and 
told her that anything the library could 
do to help on the project would be done 
joyously. The teacher, Miss Margaret 
Shea, arrived with her tent school build- 
ing and simple equipment. The County 
Library sent out books and maps of the 
world and of the United States. Many 
of the children knew no English ; some 
had been to school a little ; some quite 
regularly. School opens at 7.30 a.m. 
and continues until noon. The after- 
noons are free for work in the cotton 
fields. Great progress was noted even 
in a week, and by Christmas time they 
had advanced so that an excellent enter- 
tainment was given, which was also at- 
tended by the fathers and mothers and 
younger children. A heavy downpour of 
rain all the morning made work in the 
fields impossible and everybody in the 
camp came, some going out, after arrival, 
to dress up and return. There was a 
beautiful Christmas tree, and gifts of 
oandy, nuts, toys, balls and bats, of neck- 
ties and ribbons, and all manner of things 
dear to the hearts of children were dis- 
tributed to all the children and the par- 
ents as well. The school will continue 
as long as the cotton pickers remain. 
Miss Shea had had a school for the 
walnut pickers, and will go to the aspar- 
agus workers later. No one can see her 
at work with these children, and not 
feel that this is Americanization work 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



55 



KERN CO.— Continued. 
Bakersfield — Continued. 

of the genuine kind. It is a high priv- 
ilege for a library to have the opportu- 
nity to assist in any way in this great 
and much-needed work, for a hitherto 
neglected group. 

Cameron school district joined the 
County Free Library October 28, 1921. 

At the end of the quarter there are 
29,374 books at the schools, and 26,422 
at the branches, a total of 55,796 books, 

Work in Children's Department dur- 
ing the fall term : 

List of forty of best children's books 
prepared and circulated to parents and 
teachers to suggest appropriate titles for 
Xmas purchase. Publisher and price of 
book was given. 

List of twenty of the best stories to 
tell in schools or home, prepared and 
circulated. 

Graded book-lists of twenty-five titles 
for each school grade, prepared and cir- 
culated to each county school. Have 
found a wide use for these titles. 

To counteract g r owin g sentiment 
against Fairy Tales, sent copy of 
Frank Crane's excellent article on the 
subject which appeared in a recent issue 
of the New York "Globe," to all county 
schools. Stopped sale of vicious period- 
icals (at all book stores and stands which 
handled them) with co-operation of the 
Judge of the Juvenile Court. 

Took part in program of Teachers' 
Institute. Gave three addresses, as fol- 
lows : Wo"k of the American Library 
Association overseas, by Miss Blanche 
Galloway. Talk on "What is the Child 
Reading?" and "The Story Hour," illus- 
trated with stories, by Miss Wilhelmine 
Harper. Held book display and distri- 
buted our various book-lists during In- 
stitute. 

Introduced the excellent Child Health 
Literature (published by Child Health 
Organization of America in N. Y. ) into 
County Schools. There are child health 
rhymes, "Happy's Calendar," health 
fairy stories, plays and other features, 
both interesting and valuable. 

Have added approximately 1000 new 
and attractive juvenile books. 

During November and December made 
eleven school visits for the purpose of 



KERN CO.— Continued. 
Bakersfield — Continued, 
story telling, in response to the special 
requests from thirty-five different schools. 
Told about forty-five stories altogether, 
during those two months. Also short 
talks on books, etc. Interest of children 
ivell repaid efforts and long journeys, 
some as far as 125 miles distant. To 
some of remote desert schools, sent pack- 
ages of "Xmas goodies" to bring a little 
jladness to these isolated places. 

Instituted a "Clean Hands Case" with 
3'lass doors, at headquarters, which holds 
an attractive display of best editions of 
best children's books. Children and teach- 
ers show much interest. 

Curbing circulation, of certain excit- 
ng men's stories to children in grades, 
whose teachers make numerous requests 
for these books. In such cases, a letter 
to teacher, asking if she will not let us 
substitute books more suitable to chil- 
Iren's reading, brings ready response and 
appreciation of suggestion. 

No adult books circulated to grammar 
grade pupils, which are not selected by 
librarians in Children's Department. 
Julia G. Babcock, Lib'n. 

The Board of Supervisors has let the 
contract for the erection of the branch 
library at Wasco to George Isaac and 
Son, of Shaffer. The building will cost 
ibout .$7000. Work starts immediately. — 
Wasco News, D 17 

Bids for the new branch library build- 
: ng at Maricopa will be opened by the 
county supervisors December 5. —Fresno 
Republican, N 27 

Cameron School Dist. (P. O. Mojave). 

Cameron School Dist. Branch, 
Kern Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 28, 1921. 

Maricopa. 

Maricopa Branch, Kern Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Kern Co. Free Library. 

Wasco. 

Wasco Branch, Kern Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Kern Co. Free Library. 



56 



news notes of calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



KINGS COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1373 sq. mi. Pop. 22,031. 
Assessed valuation $28,206,785 (taxable 
for county $24,175,435). 

Kings Co. Free Library, Hanford. 
Miss Eleanore Kyle, Lib'n. 

Miss Marion Gregory was appointed 
assistant librarian on November first. 
She succeeds Mrs Lela Alexander. 

Mrs Ora Rea was appointed custodian 
of the Lucerne School Branch Novem- 
ber 4. 

Eleanore Kyle, Lib'n. 

Hanford. 

Hanford Union High School Li- 
brary. Jacob L. Neighbor, Prin. Miss 
Edith M. Church, Lib'n. 

The library is now located in its new 
quarters in the new high school building. 
It is a large airy room, located on the 
second floor of the Henry Morse Steph- 
ens building, between two study halls. 
The walls are lined with shelves and are 
nearly filled with books. We have six 
large oak veneer tables that will accom- 
modate eight students each, but as our 
funds this year were limited, we can ac- 
commodate only twenty-four with chairs 
and these are always occupied. There 
are always more students to use the li- 
brary than can be accommodated, and 
we have to limit the use to reference 
books only. We have added over two 
hundred new books to our collection this 
year, and our circulation has increased 
95 per cent over last year's. 

Edith M. Church, Lib'n. 

Lucerne School Dist. (P. O. Hanford). 

Lucerne School Dist. Branch, 
Kings Co. Free Library. 

See note under Kings Co. Free Library. 



LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 
County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5402. 
Assessed valuation $6,755,820 (taxable 
for county $6,730,640). 



LAKE CO.— Continued. 
Lakeport. 

Lakeport TFreeI Public Library. 
Mrs Ella M. Clark, Lib'n. 

The eleventh anniversary of our library 
was celebrated November 19. This is an 
annual event called "Library Day." The 
members of the Library Board of Trustees 
and the librarian served refreshments and 
entertained friends who presented the 
library with 73 books and $21. A number 
of the latest popular books of fiction have 
been purchased with the money. 

Our library is steadily gaining in mem- 
bership, books and book circulation. 

Ella M. Clark, Lib'n. 



LASSEN COUNTY. 

(Forty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 8507. 
Assessed valuation $16,639,784 (tax- 
able for county $12,778,834). 

Lassen Co. Free Library, Susan- 
ville. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

During Teachers' Institute in. October, 
a reception was held at the County Li- 
brary for the .teachers for the general 
discussion and choosing of books. A bas- 
ket of apples was placed on one of the 
tables for the refreshment of all. 

Mrs Alda C. Riesenman, former cus- 
todian of Amedee Branch, has moved 
from Amedee to Wendel. Mrs Elizabeth 
Riesenman has now charge of the branch. 
Miss Ruby DeWitt, custodian of De- 
witt Branch, was married to Frank M. 
Cottingham. She still continues as cus- 
todian. Miss Lillian Merrill, custodian of 
Karlo Branch, was married to Joseph M. 
Sequeira. She also is continuing her posi- 
tion as custodian. During the absence of 
Mrs Nettie Doyle this winter, Mrs Olive 
Bonshard will have charge of Standish 
Branch. 

The librarian took a trip with the 
County Superintendent, Mrs Julia A. Nor- 
wood. Gibson Branch and Honey Lake, 
Soldier Bridge and Standish schools were 
visited. The phonograph was taken along 
and a concert given to the pupils who 
seemed to enjoy it very much. They are 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



57 



LASSEN CO.— Continued. 

Susanvi lie— Continued. 

all enthused and anxious now for a 

phonograph and are going to work hard 

for one. 

Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

Amedee. 

- Amedee Branch, Lassen Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Lassen Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Dewitt (No exp. office). 

Dewitt Branch, Lassen Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Lassen Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Karlo. 

Karlo Branch, Lassen Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Lassen Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Standish (No exp. office). 

Standish Branch, Lassen Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Lassen Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 
County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area, 3880 sq. mi. Pop. 936,43S. 
Assessed valuation $1,414,564,717 (tax- 
able for county $1,175,262,858). 

Alhambra. 

Alhambra [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Artena M. Chapin, Lib'n. 

Miss Artena Chapin took up her duties 
as chief librarian of the Alhambra Public 
Library yesterday morning. She comes to 
Alhambra directly from Youngstown, 
Ohio, where for the past six months she 
has been in charge of the circulation and 
branch departments of the library. Miss 
Chapin was librarian of the A. K. Smiley 
Public Library in Redlands for ten years, 
leaving there two years ago. She is a 
graduate of the University of Michigan 
and of the library school of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. — Pasadena Post, D 16 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Eagle Rock. 

Eagle Rock [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs Blanche A. Gardiner, Lib'n. 

The library has made such rapid growth 
that a part-time assistant has been em- 
ployed during the busy hours. New 
stacks and magazine racks have also been 
made. A large locked box, made recently, 
is placed at the outside entrance to the 
library, so that books may be slipped into 
it, if patrons come to the library in the 
morning, or at any time when the library 
is not open. 

Blanche A. Gardiner, Lib'n. 

Glendale. 

Glendale Union High School Li- 
brary. George U. Moyse, Prin. Miss 
Charlotte Thomas, Lib'n. 

Owing to the increase in the number of 
students attending the High School the 
library has /proved to be very much 
cramped in space and the number of books 
in the library has been inadequate. 

Charlotte Thomas, Lib'n. 

La Verne. 

Bonita Union High School Library. 
Wm. T. Randall, Prin. Miss Abbie H. 
Doughty, Lib'n. 

The new library building is finished and 
open, the new furniture is in place and 
the library is one of the most attractive 
places in the new building. About twenty- 
six magazines have been ordered for the 
ensuing year. The work of cataloging is 
moving slowly forward. The disposition 
on the part of the pupils and teachers to 
make use of the library is very gratifying 
and the librarian is looking forward to a 
most profitable time during the ensuing 
months. 

Abbie H. Doughty, Lib'n. 

Los Angeles. 

t§Los Angeles [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

The City Council has taken official 
action ordering that title to the property 
owned by the City on Normal Hill be 
transferred to the Public Library as a site 
for the new Central Library Building. 

Owing to the proposed extension of Har- 
bor Boulevard and the improvement of 
Beacon Street in San Pedro, the present 



58 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued, 
site of the branch library there will be- 
come much less suitable. The Library 
Board intends to move the library else- 
where and the Harbor Commission has 
agreed to appropriate $25,000 which would 
be the cost of lowering the branch in its 
present location. The Harbor Commis- 
sion is willing to make this allowance be- 
cause the library is entitled to damages 
clue to the extension of the Harbor Boule- 
vard. 

Messrs Dodd and Richards have been 
appointed the architects for the new 
branch in Hollywood which will be erected 
where the present library stands. This 
will be moved to West Hollywood on a 
site purchased by the Library Board at 
the northwest corner of Gardner and De- 
Longpre Streets. 

The contract for binding the library's 
books for the calendar year 1922 has been 
let to the Pacific Library Binding Co. 
The contract for supplying the library 
with periodicals during 1922 has been let 
to the Sunset Subscription Agency of Los 
Angeles. 

Miss Eleanor W. Caruthei's, Principal 
of the Art and Music Department, who 
has been connected with the Public Li- 
brary for fourteen years, passed in her 
resignation on January first. Miss Har- 
riet Monfort will be in charge of this 
department up to the first of June, when 
Miss Gladys Caldwell will become the 
Principal. Miss Caldwell is a graduate 
of the Los Angeles Library School and 
the University of California and has had 
ten years' experience as a musician. 

Miss Florence Thornburg, who has been 
Principal of the Catalog Department of 
the Public Library for many years, re- 
signed, to take effect on the first of Janu- 
ary. 

Los Angeles Public Library School. 

The Library School class of 1922 has 
elected the following officers : Katherine 
F. Ball, Santa Barbara, President ; Edith 
Crandall, Montevideo, Minn., Secretary- 
treasurer. 

Mr Ferguson introduced the county 
library course by a lecture on the Cali- 
fornia system. This year -Miss McCrea 
is in charge of the part of the administra- 
tion course dealing with loan svstems. 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued. 
As usual, Miss Zaidee Brown will give 
the fundamental lectures on library ad- 
ministration with the assistance of special 
lecturers. A course in advanced cataloging 
and bibliographical research will be given 
in April by P. S. Goulding of the Hunt- 
ington Library. Dr Cole and other mem- 
bers of the Huntington staff are giving 
various lectures on bibliographical sub- 
jects. 

Miss Eleanor Foster of Bullock's Book 
Department, gave a stimulating presenta- 
tion of the problem of book ordering from 
the bookseller's -standpoint. Two Los 
Angeles bookstores are sending employees 
to the library school for special courses 
in children's books. 

Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

The selection of Bertram G. Goodhue 
of New York to draw the plans for and 
supervise the construction of Los Ange- 
les' proposed new $2,000,000 central li- 
brary building was announced by the 
Board of Library Directors yesterday. 
Associated with Mr Goodhue in the draw- 
ing of the plans will be Carleton M. 
Winslow of this city. Mr Goodhue de- 
signed the San Diego Exposition buildings 
and many other important buildings in 
various parts of the United States. — ■ 
Los Angeles Examiner, D 22 

California Society Sons of the 
Revolution (Repository of the South- 
west) and California Society of 
Colonial Wars Library. Pierson W. 
Banning, Vice Pres. Willis Milnor 
Dixon, Lib'n. 

The Society, Sons of the Revolution, in 
the State of California, with headquarters 
at 424 South Broadway, Los Angeles, 
had the most successful year in 1921 that 
it ever experienced. It admitted 157 new 
members and closed the year with a total 
membership of 725. Its historical, gene- 
alogical, biographical and war reference 
library received nearly 600 volumes in 
addition to many pamphlets, manuscripts 
and collections of genealogical and his- 
torical notes. Only three years have 
shown a larger growth than last year by 
the library. 

The accumulation of genealogical manu- 
scripts and notes the past years have 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



59 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles— Continued, 
assumed such proportions that two four- 
drawer legal sized files were obtained, and 
filled with the same at the end of the 
year, making the information available for 
the first time. Since these files have been 
installed a great many people have pre- 
sented us with manuscript copies of 
various genealogical lines and notes, and 
in some cases placed their entire collec- 
tions of genealogical data with us, fre- 
quently the largest collection of material 
relating to certain families to be found in 
any library. 

The volume of work has assumed such 
proportions that beginning with the first 
of 1922 the work has been turned over 
to Mrs Ruth Moore, who from now on 
will have charge of details. 

An appropriation of several hundred 
dollars was voted the first of this year for 
the purchase of genealogies, at our usual 
rate of purchase not to exceed one cent per 
page. Appropriations- were also made for 
various needs of the Society, among them 
being the establishment of a fund for the 
publication of volume two of the records 
of the members of the Society and his- 
torical data appropriate thereto. 

A bill for enactment b.y the State Legis- 
lature has been prepared by the Society 
to create local historians in each city, 
town and village in California. 

Pierson W. Banning, Vice Pres. 

Krotona Institute of Theosophy, 
Library of the. Mrs Betsy Jewett, 
Lib'n. 

Mrs Betsy Jewett succeeded C. J. 
Van Vliet as librarian December 1. 

Because of continued demand, a small 
stock of theosophical books for sale has 
been added. 

Betsy Jewett, Lib'n. 

Pasadena. 

§|| Pasadena [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Jeannette M. Drake, Lib'n. 

The new $12,000 bungalow which is 
being built for the Boys' and Girls' Li- 
brary will be ready for occupancy in 
February. The building is 60 by 40 feet 
in size and is located about 30 feet from 
the main building. 

A new branch has been opened in the 
Emerson School at Lamanda Park, re- 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pasadena — Continued, 
cently added to the city. There are 900 
books and 85 current magazines. Miss 
Grace Hammond is in charge of the 
branch. 

Miss Helen E. Haines has given three 
public book talks during the fall on 
"Recent Biographies," "Why Poetry," 
"Books for Christmas Gifts." 

The heads of the various City Depart- 
ments have luncheon together every Fri- 
day. The program consists of some one 
giving a talk on the work of his depart- 
ment. 

Dr Walter Adams, of the Mt. Wilson 
Observatory and also a member of the 
Pasadena Library Board, talked to the 
staff on "Relativity" December 30. 

The Pasadena Library Club met at the 
Mt. Wilson Observatory Library, Novem- 
ber 13, with an attendance of 75. The 
use of the "Photostat in Libraries" was 
the subject discussed by Dr Cole and Dr 
Bendickson of the Huntington Library. 
Miss Alice Tyler and Miss Althea Warren 
also spoke brifly. 

During November an exhibit of ISO 
colored, black and white, etchings, litho- 
graphs were displayed through the 
courtesy of the California Print Makers. 

A butterfly club has been organized 
for the boys and girls under the direction 
af Mr Hal Newcomb, an expert on the 
subject. 

Jeannette M. Drake, Lib'n. 

Pomona. 

§||Pomona [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

Rev Walter C. Buckner resigned from 
the Board of Trustees on account of leav- 
ing Pomona. In his place Rev Robert J. 
Taylor was appointed October 21. 

The library is in active co-operation 
with the Pomona School of Religion. 
The books of reference required have been 
segregated, and given a circulation period 
of two days only. This school is inter- 
denominational. Its curriculum includes 
psychology, pedagogics, and history. 

Children's Book Week was observed, 
with no very novel methods, except the 
Aldrich book case. Story hours, chil- 
dren's concerts, displays changed each day, 
notices in the papers and from the pulpits, 



60 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pomona — Continued, 
posters ; all are too familiar to be worth 
description. In spite of hard times, a 
number of book sales can be traced to 
the exhibit. 

After Christmas, a Doll Party was 
held. Each little girl was invited to 
bring her new Christmas doll, or her 
favorite older one, as she preferred. Adults 
became interested, and lent the library 
many wonderful old or unusual dolls, so 
that the showcase was crowded full. Doll 
stories, a history of dolls, children's music, 
instructions on making paper dolls, peanut 
dolls, and doll furniture were given to 
enraptured groups. On leaving, each doll 
was given a cookie and a stick of candy to 
take home. The attendance was em- 
barassingly large, but this does not deter 
us from calling the party a success, and 
from planning to make it an annual affair, 
as did the originator of the plan, Miss 
Hewins. 

As usual, the library has supplied speak- 
ers on topics literary and artistic to many 
of the clubs and other organizations. Per- 
haps not quite so much a matter of course 
is the fact that juniors as well as seniors 
on the staff have contributed these talks. 
One result of this distribution is that pa- 
trons come sooner to recognize the ability 
of all on the staff, instead of depending 
only on the older workers. The "oenefit 
to the speaker herself is too obvious to 
mention. 

S. M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

Santa Monica. 

§ Santa Monica [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

Re-registration lately taken gives us an 
active membership of 8500 or more. The 
nourishing condition of our city is re- 
flected in the library. Those who own 
property are not required to secure a 
guarantor. The phrase "But I own 
property," is much heard at the loaning 
desk and many deposits are reclaimed 
after the purchase of property. 

Comfort and convenience in the work- 
ing order of things were given by the 
placement of window shelves for reference 
work, accompanied by small chairs, the 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Santa Monica — Continued. 
enlargement of the loan desk, new catalog 
cabinets and the artistic awning adorn- 
ing the entrance to the main library. 
Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

Santa Monica High School Library. 
W. F. Barnum, Prin. Miss Mary L. Me- 

Kinley, Lib'n. 

Through the good offices of the Library 
Club of the High School, the students of 
the school have been given the privilege 
of seeing a new art exhibit each month 
of the school year. This exhibit comes 
from the Art Department of the Los 
Angeles Museum at Exposition Park and 
is hung in the High School Library for 
the month. Mrs Roberts, one of the Art 
Teachers of the High School, delivers a 
talk in the library on these pictures when 
they first come. 

The first exhibit this year was of block 
prints, with a chart showing the process 
of block printing. The second was of 
water colors by such artists as Carl Oscar 
Borg, Karl Yens, Bessie Hazen, and others 
who have been exhibiting at Exposition 
Park. The third exhibit is one of etch- 
ings loaned by Howell C. Brown, and 
with this also has come a chart showing 
the process of etching. 

Mary L. McKinley, Lib'n. 



MADERA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh class.) 

County seat, Madera. 
Area, 2140 sq. mi. Pop. 12,203. 
Assessed valuation $22,465,890 (tax- 
able for county $19,09S,855) • 

Madera Co. Free Library, Madera. 
Miss Mary E. Glock, Lib'n (on leave of 
absence). Miss Julia Steffa, Acting 
Lib'n. 

The Madera County Library had an at- 
tractive booth at the Chowchilla Fair, 
October 26 and 27, 1921, the exhibit 
illustrating the resources of the library. 

During October the library had an ex- 
hibit of books and appliances for the 
blind, loaned by the State Library. Chil- 
dren's Book Week was observed by special 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



61 



MADERA CO.— Continued. 

exhibits, book lists, and the display of the 
Thomas Bailey Aldrich book shelf filled 
with an attractive selection of boys' books. 
The book shelf was made by the Manual 
Training Department of the grammar- 
school. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished in the Ashview and Tharsa school 
districts and a branch was re-established 
in the Wallace school district, with Mrs 
Sarah L. Steward as custodian. 

Julia Steffa, Acting Lib'n. 



Ashview School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 

Chowchilla). 
Ashview School Dist. Beanch, Ma- 
dera Co. Free Library, was established 
in October, 1921. Eleanor M. Brown, 
Custodian. 



Madera. 

Madera Union High School Library 
and Branch, Madera Co. Free Library. 
Prof R. J. Teall, Prin. Mrs Barta E. 
Hilliard, Lib'n. 

The Madera Union High School Library 
can report progress in the three new 
ideas attempted this year. The issue of 
fiction for recreational reading has in- 
creased 100 per cent. This is a distinct 
gain, as the fiction handled is carefully 
selected and therefore this gain indicates 
a growing appreciation of the better class 
of books. The hourly circulation of maga- 
zines is also developing the magazine 
habit and shaping tastes for worthwhile 
articles and stories. This ample supply 
of high class magazines has crowded the 
"Jazz" ones into the discard. But per- 
haps our greatest success lies in proving 
to the pupils the value of the restriction 
of reference books to overnight use and 
the insistence that all such books shall be 
available every hour of the school day 
for every one in the library. The restric- 
tion which was at first resented is now 
meeting with both the appreciation and 
co-operation of all concerned. 

Barta E. Hilliard, Lib'n. 



MADERA CO.— Continued. 
Madera — Continued. 
Tharsa School Dist. (P. O. Herndon; 
no exp. office). 
Tharsa School Dist. Branch, Ma- 
dera Co. Free Library, was established 
in October, 1921. Ethel M. Vargas, Cus- 
todian. 

Wallace School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Madera). 

Wallace School Dist. Branch, Ma- 
dera Co. Free Library. 

See note under Madera Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

MARIN COUNTY. 
(Twenty-fifth class.) 
County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 27,343. 
Assessed valuation $26,668,602 (tax- 
able for county $24,142,775). 

San Rafael. 

San Rafael [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Margaret McDonald, Acting Lib'n. 

At the first of this year Miss May 
Cooper, for sixteen years the librarian 
of the San Rafael Public Library, re- 
signed. The Trustees have appointed 
Miss Anna L. Sawyer, who for so many 
years has been identified with library 
work in California, to spend the next 
three months in reorganizing the library. 
Margaret McDonald, Acting Lib'n. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty- third class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 15S0 sq. mi. Pop. 2775, 
Assessed valuation $5,286,386 (taxable 
for county $4,659,794). 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-eighth class.) 
County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3100 sq. mi. Pop. 24,116. 
Assessed valuation $29,886,216 (tax- 
able for county $26,437,472). 



62 



news notes OF calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



MENDOCINO CO.— Continued. 

Ukiah. 

Ukiah Free Public Library. Mrs. 
Mary L. Burrey, Lib'n. 

During the month of August the library 
was closed for two weeks to enable the 
interior to be repaired and painted. The 
bookshelves were also revarnished. This 
was rendered necessary as part of the 
ceiling had begun to fall. Needless to say 
everyone was delighted at the new appear- 
ance and healthy atmosphere of the 
library. 

Since the High School re-opened the ac- 
tendance has been very large. There has 
been a series of debates. This taxes the 
time and energy of the librarian, as so 
much of the routine work has to be left to 
odd moments. Wle are more than anxious 
to have a County Library here, and feel 
sure when the Supervisors see their way 
to obtain one they will see their efforts re- 
warded. 

Our room attendance for the last three 
months was 6420, which shows that the 
library is a popular place. We have had 
many volumes donated and at Christmas 
the patrons donated two boxes of good 
books to the soldiers at the hospital at 
Talmage for their Christmas gift. We 
still send them discarded magazines. 

Mary L. Burrey, Lib'n. 



MERCED COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 24,579. 
Assessed valuation $34,868,653 (taxable 
for county $29,443,471). 

Dos Palos (Exp. South Dos Palos). 

Dos Palos Joint Union High School 
Library. W. M. Scott, Prin. 

The classification and cataloging of the 
High School library is being carried on. 
About thirty new volumes have been added 
this year. These books are mostly in the 
field of poetry and prose by living English 
and American authors. 

W. M. Scott, Prin. 



MODOC COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second class.) 
County seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 5425. 
Assessed valuation $8,450,770 (taxable 
for county $8,036,S95). 

JModoc Co. Free Library, Alturas. 
Miss Anna L. Williams, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were es- 
tablished at Arlington, Clover Swale, 
Coffman's, Cottonwood, Delmerma, Hope- 
well, Jess Valley, Mt. Bidwell, Owl Creek, 
Westside and Winter. 

Anna L. Williams, Lib'n. 

Arlington (P. O. Canby). 
Arlington Branch, Modoc Co. Free 
Library, was established October 5, 1921. 

Clover Swale (P. O. and exp. Alturas). 
Clover Swale Branch, Modoc Co. 
Free Library, was established October 
5, 1921. 

Coffman's (P. O. and exp. Likely). 

Coffman's Branch, Modoc Co. Free 
Library, was established December 1, 
1921. Mrs Coffman, Custodian. 

Cottonwood (P. O. and exp. Cedar - 
ville). 
Cottonwood Branch, Modoc Co. Free 
Library, was established October 5, 1921. 

Delmerma (P. O. and exp. Alturas). 
Delmerma Beanch, Modoc Co. Free 
Library, was established October 5, 1921. 

Hopewell (P. O. and exp. Alturas). 
Hopewell Branch, Modoc Co. Free 
Library, was established October 5, 1921, 

Jess Valley (P. O. and exp. Alturas). 
Jess Valley Branch, Modoc Co. Free 
Library, was established November 2, 
1921. 

Mt. Bidwell (P. O. and exp. Ft. 
Bidwell). 

Mt. Bidwell Branch, Modoc Co. Free 
Library, was established November 2, 
1921. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



63 



MODOC CO. — Continued. 
Owl Cresk (P. O. and exp. Cedarville). 
Owl Creek Brangh, Modoc Co. Free 
Library, was established November 5, 
1921. 

Westside (P. O. and exp. Willow 
Ranch). 

Westside Branch, Modoc Co. Free 
Library, was established November 5, 
1921. 

Winter (P. O. and exp. Canby). 
Winter Branch, Modoc Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established November 5, 1921. 



MONO COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh class.) 
County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 2798 sq. mi. Pop. 960. 
Assessed valuation $4,102,570 (taxable 
for county $2,140,815). 



MONTEREY COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,980. 
Assessed valuation $46,316,112 (tax- 
able for county $39,916,474). 

Monterey Co. Free Library, Salinas. 
Miss Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 

During the session of the Central Coast 
Section of the California Teachers Asso- 
ciation which met at Santa Cruz October 
3 to 5, 1921, and which includes the coun- 
ties of Santa Cruz, San Benito, San Luis 
Obispo and Monterey, the County Li- 
braries of Monterey and San Luis Obispo 
counties held office hours and exhibits at 
the High School. A room near the As- 
sembly Hall, where the sessions were held, 
was assigned for the exhibits which were 
very well attended, the teachers seenrng 
glad of the opportunity to inspect the new 
books on the courses of study and consult 
with the County Librarians. Mrs Bessie 
Herrman Twaddle assisted during the 
busiest hours, and Miss Minerva Water- 
man of the Santa Cruz Library helped 
with loans and many courtesies. Miss 
Waterman received the Santa Cruz 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 
County teachers at the school headquar- 
ters at the Public Library. 

Miss Flo Gantz of San Luis Obispo 
County, Mrs Ora Regnart of San Benito 
County and Miss Anne Hadden and Miss 
Ellen Frink of Monterey County attended 
the Institute. 

The Monterey County Free Library in 
co-operation with the Salinas Public Li- 
brary, held an exhibit of children's books 
suitable for Christmas presents in Novem- 
ber. The exhibit opened during Children's 
Book Week and continued through the 
month. 

Mrs Ralph L. Hughes of Salinas has 
presented to the Monterey County Free 
Library about four hundred books from 
the library of her father, Doctor S. B. 
Gordon, who was an old resident of Mon- 
terey County. A special book plate was 
printed for these books. 

Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 

Monterey. 
Presidio of Monterey, Post Library. 

The supply of fiction at the library at 
this post has always been inadequate and 
funds are not available for the purchase 
of a sufficient amount of books to supply 
the demand. However, about two months 
ago, approximately one hundred books of 
red blooded outdoor type of story were 
purchased with funds which were raised 
locally and they have been in constant 
use since their receipt. The supply of 
this type of fiction is still too small and 
we hope to have it increased considerably 
in the near future. 

We have also been handicapped for lack 
of space, but in a very short time the 
library is to have better and larger quar- 
ters across the street from the post ex- 
change building where it is at present 
located. With our new quarters and in- 
creased supply of popular fiction the 
library will be much better equipped to 
meet the demand upon it. One room in 
the new library quarters will be set aside 
for reading and writing, stationery being 
provided for the men. The books will be 
kept in a separate room and will do away 
with much of the congestion due to the 
cramped condition of our present quarters. 
T. F. Limbocker, Captain, 11th Cavalry. 



64 



news notes of CALIFORNIA libraries. [January, 1922 



NAPA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first class.) 
County seat, Napa. 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 20,G7S. 
Assessed valuation $24,695,190 (taxable 
for county $21,532,590). 

Napa Co. Feee Library, Napa. Miss 
Estella De Ford, Lib'n. 

The end of the quarter brings the 
library to the completion of its second 
year. The last of October we closed the 
library for ten days in order to move to 
the lower floor of the Hall of Records. 
On November 11 the library was reopened 
with a reception given to the teachers, 
custodians and general public. Everyone 
has admired the pleasing and commodious 
new quarters. 

The State Hospital has received several 
donations of books and the County Li- 
brary Branch there has been discontinued 
for the present. The Monticello Branch 
has been moved to the Hotel with Mrs. 
Nelle Foss Moore in charge. Mrs Eisan, 
custodian of our Spring Valley Branch, 
has been doing some very good work in 
reaching the remoter parts of the county 
with books. Books go out and come back 
in lots from her branch to Conn Valley 
and she is also reaching isolated indi- 
viduals. 

Estella De Ford, Lib'n. 

Monticello (No exp. office). 

Monticello Branch, Napa Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Napa Co. Free Library. 

Napa. 

Goodman [Free Public] Library. 
Miss Minnie C. Shreve, Lib'n. 

Perhaps one of the most important 
happenings this quarter was the appoint- 
ment by the City Council of Mrs Charles 
Ferguson as member of the Library Board 
to take the place left vacant by Mrs Far- 
man. Mrs Ferguson has been engaged in 
business and educational work in the 
community, having been at one time 
County Superintendent of Schools. Mrs 
Farman's removal to Los Angeles not only 
deprives our Board of her presence and 
counsel, but our community of her literary 
ability. She has presented to the library 
her book "Where the Mississippi Flows." 



NAPA CO.— Continued. 
Napa — Continued. 
We have had visits from Mrs Anderson, 
Librarian of the St. Helena Library, Mrs 
Henshall of the California State Library 
and Miss Dorothy Kemper of the Museum 
of Paleontology of the State University. 

The ladies of the Parent-Teacher Asso- 
ciation made possible our Children's Book 
Week which was held on the lower floor. 
We were delighted with the gift of $50 
for the purchase of books from a generous 
out-of-town patron. 

Minnie C. Shreve, Lib'n. 

St. Helena. 

St. Helena [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs G. B. Anderson, Lib'n. 

Our annual circulation for the year 
1921 was 16,980 volumes. This includes 
our periodical circulation. 

Mr Spencer Mastick, a new member of 
our board of trustees, gave to our library 
one hundred books that came to him from 
the library of his father, the late George 
H. Mastick of Alameda. The Women's 
Improvement Club placed on the shelves 
of our Juvenile Department two complete 
sets of Thornton W. Burgess' books, mak- 
ing a total of 317 books added during the 
year. 

With the increase of our appropriation 
we have been able to make a few improve- 
ments and increase the salaries. 

Mrs G. B. Anderson, Lib'n. 

Spring Valley (P. O. St. Helena; no 

exp. office). 

Spring Valley Branch, Napa Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Napa Co. Free Library. 

State Hospital (P. O. Imola; no exp. 

office). 

State Hospital Branch, Napa Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Napa Co. Free Library. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth class.) 
County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 982 sq. mi. Pop. 10,850. 
Assessed valuation $9,305,221 (taxable 
for county $6,996,475) . 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



65 



ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, 7S0 sq. mi. Pop. 61,375. 
Assessed valuation $128,569,920 (tax- 
able for county $115,729, 1S5). 

Orange Co. Feee Library, Santa 
Ana. Miss Margaret Livingston, Lib'n. 

To Main Street in Santa Ana has been 
added a California County Free Library 
sign (loaned by Miss Gleason of Los An- 
geles County). The windows on either 
side of the door over which it hangs bear 
signs, Farm Adviser, Farm Bureau. 
Down one side of the big room is a line 
of double shelving, desks for Librarian 
and Assistant Librarian, catalog and filing 
cases. On the other side, beyond long 
august tables for committee conference, 
the row of curtained private offices of 
Farm Adviser, Assistant Farm Adviser 
and Farm Bureau Secretary-Manager. 
Two office assistants guide the constant 
stream of visitors, answer an insistent 
telephone bell, and lend typewriter accom- 
paniment to conversation. 

From this center the Orange County 
Free Library collection of 5500 books goes 
out to twenty-four distributing points : 
seven community branches, fifteen grade 
schools, and two high schools. Commun- 
ity service is given from seven schools and 
others will extend it as soon as books are 
available. At one school the teacher in 
charge of the library says she is frequently 
stopped on the street to answer inquiries 
about books. She recently received a note 
from a young man working on a ranch, 
"Will the dear little school teacher please 
select and send me a book from the li- 
brary?" In all of the grammar schools 
the first need was to supply the series of 
readers adopted by the County Board of 
Education in June, for the first three 
grades. These were delivered when the 
school was first visited, the number needed 
being estimated from the County Super- 
intendent's attendance record. A few 
books for home reading have now been 
sent to each school. 

Six community branches, reporting for 
December, circulated about eighteen hun- 
dred books, an average of two readings 
for each book. So keen has been the 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 

demand that custodians at times reported 
that it was necessary to close before the 
regular hour because all books had been 
taken out. At one branch the first ship- 
ment of children's books were so eagerly 
received that one little girl re-read all of 
the easier books and "Jenny Wren," a 
favorite, she borrowed five times. The 
County Library is giving special attention 
to places farthest from the established 
public libraries, all of which generously 
extend privileges to borrowers outside 
strict boundaries. Much friendly help 
has been given the new organization by 
the older libraries. 

The County Librarian has visited and 
given informal talks at seven P. T. A. 
meetings and three P. T. A. district 
meetings, five Farm Centers, three clubs, 
one Board of City Trustees, one Chamber 
of Commerce, and presided at a section 
conference of the County Teachers' In- 
stitute, and has not met Bebe Daniels' 
friend, Judge Cox. 

During the quarter branches were es- 
tablished at Brea, Centralia, Cypress, El 
Toro, Garden Grove, Laguna Beach, La 
Habra, Ocean View and Seal Beach, and 
in the following school districts : Bay 
City, Bolsa, El Toro, Huntington Beach, 
Ocean View and Orange Thorpe. 

Margaret Livingston, Lib'n. 



Anaheim. 

Anaheim [Free] Public Library. 
J. Elizabeth Calnon, Lib'n. 

Beginning with the first of the year, a 
new schedule of opening hours has been 
arranged. The library now opens at 9 
a.m. and remains open until 9 p.m. Al- 
though the new schedule has been in 
effect a short time, a large number of 
patrons have expressed themselves as very 
much pleased. 

A very much needed increase in the 
appropriation has also been secured for 
this year, all employees received a raise 
in salary, and a second assistant is now 
employed. 

Several new pieces of furniture, includ- 
ing a charging desk, have been installed 
by the Library Bureau. We have been 



5—16230 



66 



news notes Of California libraries. [January, 1922 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Anaheim — Continued, 
several years and find it the most satis- 
factory. 

J. Elizabeth Calnon, Lib'n. 

Anaheim Union High School Li- 
brary. J. A. Clayes, Prin. Miss Lillian 
L. Hutchinson, Lib'n. 

Since September 1, 1921, about 200 
books have been placed in the library and 
in addition to these 72 volumes of maga- 
zines have been bound and placed on the 
shelves. 

The following books of biography and 
travel are among the recent additions 
which are being widely read and much 
enjoyed : Bok, The Americanization of 
Edward Bok ; Paine, Boy's Life of Mark 
Twain ; Cody, Autobiography of Buffalo 
Bill ; Canfield, Diary of a Forty-niner ; 
Custer, Boots and Saddles ; James, The 
Grand Canyon, How to See It ; Kolb, The 
Grand Canyon from Wyoming to Mexico. 
A beautifully illustrated set of "The 
Nature Library" has been added. 

Plans are under way for a new library 
room which will be ready for occupancy 
in a few months. The shelving and much 
of the furniture for the new library is to 
be installed by the Library Bureau. 

A file of pamphlets and clippings has 
been started and two vertical filing cases 
purchased to house this material. 

Lillian L. Hutchinson, Lib'n. 

Bay City School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Seal Beach). 
Bay City School Dist. Branch, 
Orange Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished October 3, 1921. 

Bolsa School Dist. (P. O. Santa Ana, 
R. R.). 
Bolsa School Dist. Branch, Orange 
Co. Free Library, was established No- 
vember 1, 1921. 

Brea. 

Brea Branch, Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established October 11, 1921. 

A center of the oil industry, strongly 
enthusiastic in support of the County 
Library, and first community branch. 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Brea — Continued. 
The manager of a garage centrally located 
consented to rent his show room to the 
city for reading room and library, which 
is open every afternoon and evening. 
Gifts for Brea Branch were received from 
Mrs Pickering, Rev Mitchell and others. 
Over three hundred books have been sent 
to the branch, but very few are found on 
the shelves. Children coming from school 
haunt the room and pounce on every "real 
story" that arrives. 

Buena Park. 

Buena Park Library District Li- 
brary. Miss Anna R. Luebkeman, Lib'n. 

A new desk and reading table have been 
added to the library. Also new rugs were 
put on the floors. 

There has been a marked increase in 
circulation of books and also in the num- 
ber of new patrons in the last few months. 
Anna R. Luebkeman, Lib'n. 

Central ia (P. O. Anaheim, R. R.). 

Centralia Branch, Orange Co. Free 
Library, was established November 7, 
1921. 

Cypress (P. O. Anaheim, R. R. 2, 
Box 188). 

Cypress Branch, Orange Co. Free 
Library, was established December 6, 
1921. 

This branch was established as a Farm 
Center project of work for the community, 
made possible by the kindness of Mr 
Carpenter. Only recently established, it 
bids fair to become very active, and is now 
waiting for many books specially re- 
quested. 

El Toro. 
El Toro School Dist. Branch, Or- 
ange Co. Free Library, was established 
November 10, 1921. 

El Toro Branch, Orange Co. Free 
Library, was established November 10, 
1921. 

Garden Grove. 
Garden Grove Branch, Orange Co. 
Free Library, was established October 
25, 1921. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



67 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Garden Grove — Continued. 
A home was given the branch library 
in a small room of the News office, but 
so popular did it become that it threatened 
to suppress the news by the time re- 
quired in loaning books, so it has been 
moved into the Civic Club rooms and is 
ably sponsored by the Civic Club, Cham- 
ber of Commerce and other organizations. 

Huntington Beach. 

§HUNTINGTON BEACH [FREE] PUBLIC 

Library. Miss Bertha D. Proctor, Lib'n. 
The Huntington Beach Library has 
recently added bookstacks, catalog case, 
magazine rack, bulletin board and display 
x'ack of Library Bureau furniture. The 
steel book shelves have proved unsatis- 
factory and we will replace with the Li- 
brary Bureau equipment as fast as funds 
allow. 

Orange County Library Cluh. 

The meeting on Labor Day was held in 
the Newport Library with Mrs Douglas, 
Librarian, and Trustees as hosts, and 
proved very profitable. Miss Margaret 
Guthrie (now Mrs Scott) of the Orange 
High School led the discussion "Adver- 
tising the Public Library." Miss Kos- 
tomlatsky gave a very helpful talk along 
this line. 

On Armistice Day the members of the 
club were entertained at the Public Li- 
brary at Huntington Beach. Twenty- 
seven were present beside visitors. The 
discussion "Library Problems" was led by 
Miss Ramona Bean of the Library Bu- 
reau. There were no wallflowers ; every- 
one entered into the discussion. Miss 
Marion Llorton of Los Angeles gave a 
talk on cooperation. At one o'clock the 
guests went to the rooms below where 
long tables were loaded with goodies. The 
center pieces were mounds of red, white 
and blue flowers with guns and flags 
stacked. Flags of the different nations 
were scattered about. At each place was 
a tiny hand-painted oil derrick. 

This was the Orange County Library 
Club's first birthday party. The first 
meeting was held in Fullerton. We have 
since met in Anaheim, Whittier and New- 



O RANGE CO.— Continued. 

Huntington Beach — Continued. 

port. The next meeting will be in Santa 

Ana, February 22, with city, county and 

high school libraries as hosts. 

Bertha D. Proctor, Sec. 

Huntington Beach School Dist. 
Branch, Orange Co. Free Library, was 
established Oct. 7, 1921. 

Laguna Beach. 

Laguna Beach Branch, Orange Co. 
Free Library, was established Oct. 25, 
1921. 

Most parties are over in one evening, 
but the book party given for the benefit 
of the branch library the last of October 
has not ended yet. Admission to the 
party was a book read and enjoyed by 
the donor. With older favorites were re- 
ceived the two volume edition of Wells' 
History, Thayer's Roosevelt and some of 
the most popular new fiction. Every few 
days a new consignment of donated books 
comes to headquarters to be cataloged, 
nearly three hundred in all. In spite of 
this good collection, Laguna sends' many 
requests for new fiction, art, travel, plays, 
and good juveniles. 

La Habra. 

La Habra Branch, Orange Co. Free 
Library, was established Nov. 8, 1921. 

Fortunate is the library with sound 
financial backing ! La Habra Branch is 
temporarily located in the directors' room 
of the Citizens' National Bank. A large, 
able and active committee made up of 
representatives of all organizations in the 
community, under the leadership of Mrs 
Frederick Drake, has devised and carried 
through a plan for permanent quarters by 
raising money to buy a small house to be 
converted into a library. It has been 
moved on to a well located lot, and the 
library will soon be moved into its new 
home. Here performance counts. A 
young man promised a donation if the 
library could furnish a book on gas en- 
gines, and the State Library sent at once 
just the right one. 



68 



news notes op California librabies. [January, 1922 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Ocean View (P. O. Huntington Beach). 
Ocean View Branch, Oeange Co. 
Free Library, was established Nov. 21, 
1921. 

Ocean View School Dist. Branch, 
Orange Co. Free Library,, was estab- 
lished Nov. 21, 1921. 

Orange. 

Orange Union High School Library. 
F. A. Henderson, Prin. Mrs Margaret 
Guthrie Scott, Lib'n. 

During the second week of school the 
library, was closed one whole day and 
each Freshman class, with the teacher, 
reported at the library for an introductory 
lesson in how to find things in the library. 
The Library Science class, consisting of 
five girls, assisted in this work. 

About 340 volumes have been added to 
our library since September. Books of 
modern drama, books about the drama, 
and books of fiction make up the bulk of 
this order. 

Margaret G. Scott, Lib'n. 

Orange Thorpe School Dist. (P. O. 
Anaheim, R. R.). 
Orange Thorpe School Dist. Branch, 
Orange Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished Oct. 3, 1921. 

San Juan Capistrano. 

San Juan Capistrano Union High 
School Branch, Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

A new High School building offered a 
plan and place for a joint high school 
and community library. The room has 
an outside entrance, is light and pleasant, 
and commands a beautiful view of hills 
beyond the Mission ruins. The manual 
training department of the school has put 
in tables, shelves and magazine rack. 
The shelves are pretty empty yet, but a 
good list of current magazines furnishes 
an opportunity to enjoy this fine reading- 
room. 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Seal Beach. 

Seal Beach Branch, Orange Co. 
Free Library, was established Oct. 11, 
1921. 

The custodian reports a growing interest 
in the library, and that she loves the 
work. Books for boys and girls are sent 
to the school, because it is located at one 
side of the town and it is more convenient 
for many of the children to get books in 
that way. 



PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class.) 
County seat, Auburn. 
Area, 14S4 sq. mi. Pop. 18,584. 
Assessed valuation $18,505,624 (taxable 
for county $12,842,330). 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 
County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5681. 
Assessed valuation $21,220,247 (tax- 
able for county $15,262,308). 

Plumas Co. Free Library, Quincy. 
Miss Carmelita Duff, Lib'n. 

Branches have been established during 
the quarter at Paxton and at Caribou, the 
Power House of the Great Western Power 
Company. Loop School, a newly formed 
school district, has become a branch of 
the county library. The branch at Chil- 
coot has been discontinued. 

Practically all of the books in the La 
Porte Branch were lost when the home of 
Mrs L. L. Hillman, library custodian, was 
destroyed by fire. The library was closed 
at the time and the books being held from 
circulation on account of a contagious dis- 
ease epidemic in the town. 

William McGowan resigned as part- 
time assistant at headquarters in Decem- 
ber and was succeeded by Robert Young. 

During Children's Book Week a collec- 
tion of children's books was placed on 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



69 



PLUMAS CO.— Continued, 
display at headquarters and lists of good 
books for children and the Jessie Wilcox 
Smith card, "More Books in the Home," 
were distributed at headquarters and sent 
to branches and schools. Publicity was 
given through posters, special articles in 
the local papers and circular letters to 
the schools. Children and parents were 
invited to visit the library frequently dur- 
ing the week and books for parents on 
children's reading were listed and placed 
with the exhibit of children's books. The 
success of Children's Book Week and the 
assurance that it has become an institu- 
tion of the library were indicated by the 
eagerness with which the children looked 
for it and their acceptance of it as an 
annual occurrence. 

Cakmelita Duff, Lib'n. 

The furniture for the library quarters 
in the new courthouse has arrived and 
was unpacked during the week. The 
actual moving of the library will take 
place next week. The two rooms assigned 
to the county library will be furnished 
entirely in oak and will be among the 
handsomest rooms in the building. — 
Quincy Independent, 6 

Caribou. 

Caeibou Branch, Plumas Co. Free 
Library, was established during the quar- 
ter. 

Chilcoot. 

Chilcoot Branch, Plumas Co. Free 
Library, was discontinued during the 
quarter. 

La Porte (No exp. office). 

La Porte Branch, Plumas Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Plumas Co. Free Library. 

Loop School Dist. 
Loop School Dist. Branch, Plumas 
Co. Free Library, was established dur- 
ing the quarter. 

Paxton. 
Paxton Branch, Plumas Co. Free 
Library, was established during the 
quarter. 



RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 
County seat, Riverside. 
Area, 700S sq. mi. Pop. 50,297. 
Assessed valuation $50,S37,731 (tax- 
able for county $3S,679,370) . 

Elsinore. 

Elsinore Union High School Li- 
brary and Branch, Riverside Co. Free 
Library. A. J. Barnes, Prin. 

We have just added a set of Winston's 
Cumulative Encyclopedia to our High 
School Library.. 

A. J. Barnes, Prin. 

Riverside. 

§j|Riverside [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Lillian L. Dickson, Acting Lib'n. 

The $30,000 addition to the Riverside 
Public Library is nearly completed and 
will be ready for occupancy by January 
first. The Carnegie Corporation donated 
$25,000 towards this addition and $5,000 
was contributed by a few prominent citi- 
zens of Riverside. 

Mrs Mabel Faulkner, after a leave of 
absence of four months in the Hawaiian 
Islands will return to her duties in the 
Riverside Public Library January 3. 
Riverside Library Service School. 

The winter session of the Riverside Li- 
brary Service School will begin January 
9. There are thirty-four students en- 
rolled. This is the largest winter school 
class we have ever had. The classes are 
to be held in the new addition to the 
library which has just been completed. 
It is hoped that the building adjoining 
the library, which was purchased for 
school purposes, will be remodeled and 
ready for use during the summer session. 
This will provide for the additional floor 
space which was so much needed and will 
give ample room for the student classes. 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, formerly Li- 
brarian at Alhambra Public Library, now 
assistant librarian at Long Beach Public 
Library, will teach the subject "Library 
Administration." 

Mrs Mabelle Chace Grover, Riverside 
'14, has recently been appointed libra- 
rian at Santa Cruz High School., She 
succeeds Miss Elizabeth Patton, River- 
side '18, who has accepted a position in 



70 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Riverside — Continued, 
one of the junior high schools at Berkeley. 
Miss Mabel G. Anderson, Riverside '19, 
has been appointed librarian of the Ros- 
lindale Branch of the Boston Public Li- 
brary. Miss Ruth Ellis, Riverside '21, 
has been appointed assistant in the Santa 
Ana Public Library, beginning January 
3d. Miss Margaret Guthrie, Riverside 
'18, librarian of the Orange Union High 
School, was married to William Franklin 
Scott on the 14th of November. Mrs 
Scott will continue to act as librarian at 
the Orange U. H. S. Miss Roberta Ing- 
ram, Riverside '14, later assistant in the 
Visalia Public Library and Stanislaus 
County Free Library and during the past 
few months on the staff of the Riverside 
Public Library, has been appointed assist- 
ant in the Orange Public Library, be- 
ginning January 3d. Miss Marian Hicks 
Shaver, Riverside '21, has been appointed 
Children's Librarian in the Parmly Bil- 
lings Memorial Library, Billings, .aon- 
tana. She began her duties November 15. 
Mrs Charles R. Tayles (Sara Rideout), 
Riverside '20, has been employed as as- 
sistant in the Fullerton Union High 
School. 

Lillian L. Dickson, Acting Lib'n. 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 
County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 988 sq. mi. Pop. 90,978. 
Assessed valuation $133,0O3,S82 (tax- 
able for county $112,253,954). 

Sacramento Co. Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, 
Lib'n. 

During the quarter the County Libra- 
rian visited 7 schools and 8 branches. In 
all of the schools stories were told to the 
children. A branch was established at 
the Gait Standard Oil Station with H. C. 
Flinn as custodian and in the Union 
School District, Miss Phyllis Beitzel, 
teacher. 

The following addresses were made by 
the County Librarian during the quarter : 
Oct. 5, Tehama County Teachers' Insti- 
tute, "To the Happy Isles" ; Oct. 14, 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 
Washington School (Sacramento) P. T. 
A., "Children's Reading" ; Oct. 18, Sacra- 
mento County Teachers' Institute, "Mat- 
ters of Interest to Teachers of Sacra- 
mento Co." ; Nov. 15, Newcastle Woman's 
Club, "Children's Reading" ; Dec 2, East 
Sacramento P. T. A., "The Young Girl's 
Reading" ; Dec. 15, Isleton Union School 
Dedication, "The County Library. Its 
Scope and Purpose." 

Owen Holmes began work in the Sacra- 
mento County Free Library as general 
utility boy Dec. 29, an addition to the 
staff greatly needed and deeply appreci- 
ated. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Lib'n. 



Gait. 
Galt Standard Oil Branch, Sacra- 
mento Co. Free Library, was established 
Nov. 22, 1921. 

Sacramento. 

i§ Sacramento Free Lublic Library. 
Miss Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

The staff entertained at a Hallowe'en 
party October 31, having as guests the 
staff of the California State Library, the 
Sacramento County Library, the City 
Manager and his wife and the City Con- 
troller and his wife. Many of the guests 
came in appropriate costume and entered 
with fine spirit into all the games that 
had been planned for. 

November 11 to 18 the library cele- 
brated Children's Book Week which did 
much to advertise the value of the library 
and its books to the citizens of Sacra- 
mento. An attractive exhibit was placed 
in the librarian's office. This consisted 
of books for girls, books for boys, Boy 
Scout books in a Thomas Bailey Aldrich 
book case that was made by the pupils of 
McKinley School, attractive, illustrated 
books for the little folks, and about twenty 
beautifully illustrated editions of unusual 
children's books borrowed from the Cali- 
fornia State Library. This attracted a 
very great deal of attention. The result 
has been an increase in the number of 
children borrowers and a real interest on 
the part of the parents in worth while 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



71 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 
Sacramento — Continued, 
books for their girls and boys. Miss Cor- 
inne Buttle, formerly in the Children's 
Department of the Queen Anne Branch 
of the Seattle Public Library arrived the 
first of January to take charge of the 
Children's Room and much is expected of 
this addition to the staff. 

An increase of $10 a month in the sala- 
ries of several of the members of the staff 
was recommended to the City Manager 
who reported favorably on it to the mem- 
bers of the City Council, to take effect 
Jan. 1. 

Statistics for the six months show an 
increase of 21,000 circulation over the 
same period of the previous year. 

Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

Union School Dist. 
Union School Dist. Branch, Sac- 
ramento Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished Nov. 17, 1921. 



SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 
County seat, Hollister. 
Area, 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8995. 
Assessed valuation $14,256,227 (tax- 
able for county $12,730,850). 

San Benito Co. Free Library, Hol- 
lister. Mrs Ora M. Regnart, Lib'n. 

The County Library received the maxi- 
mum of twenty-five dollars a teacher from 
the December apportionment of school li- 
brary funds. 

Mr W. J. Cagney, who for many years 
was County Superintendent of Schools in 
this county, resigned Nov. 1 to accept a 
position as Rural Supervisor in Los An- 
geles County. Mr Cagney was an ardent 
supporter of the county library and it 
was through his efforts that the county 
library was established in this county. 
We shall miss Mr Cagney's help and sup- 
port in the school work. Mrs James Sla- 
vin was oppointed to fill the vacancy. 
Ora M. Regnart, Lib'n. 



SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 
County seat, San Bernardino. 
Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. 73,401. 
Assessed valuation $S9 ,511,779 (taxable 
for county $54,161,950). 

San Bernardino Co. Free Library, 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
Waters, Lib'n. 

A branch was established at Westend 
Nov. 2, 1921. It is located in the store 
and post office and George F. Parsons is 
the custodian. 

Mr Herbert McCullough is the new cus- 
todion at Camp Baldy Branch, having 
taken charge Oct. 20, 1921. Miss Estelle 
Obenshain is the new custodian at Moron- 
go Branch. She took charge the first of 
December, 1921. The post-office address 
of this branch is Banning. Riverside 
County, California, and express is sent to 
Whitewater, California, care Mrs Fred 
Pollard. The branch is located at Pol- 
lard's Ranch in Morongo Valley. Mrs 
A. E. Hughes is acting as the custodian 
at Pinecrest during the winter. Miss 
Elizabeth Grundke is the new custodian 
at Trona Branch, having taken charge 
Nov. 1, 1921. The new hours are Tues- 
day, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday* 
6.30 to 7.30 p.m. and Saturday 2 to 4 p.m. 
also. The reading room is open these 
hours, too. 

The Big Bear Valley Branch with Mrs 
J. C. Brandenburg as custodian is now 
located in the office of the Swastika Camp 
for the winter. It is open daily from 2 
to 5 p.m. Our branch at Strawberry 
Flats in the San Bernardino Mountains 
was closed for the winter Nov. 1, 1921. 

The school at Camp Baldy started too 
late to have the district formed this year, 
and we are giving this school free library 
service for this school year. The school 
was opened Oct. 14, 1921. Like the Camp 
Baldy School, Glenn Ranch School was 
started too late to have a district formed 
this year. We are giving this school free 
library service for this school year also. 
The school opened Sept. 17, 1921 and 
closed about the middle of October, but 
was reopened Nov. 16, 1921. 



72 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

The California Junior Republic is the 
new name for the California George Jun- 
ior Republic. Wilbur Hunt is the cus- 
todian under the direction of Mr Baldwin. 
The hours are Thursday, 6.30 to 7.30 p.m., 
Saturday 6.30 to 7 p.m. and Sunday 2 to 
2.30 and 6.30 to 7.30 p.m. 

The Atolia Branch is open on week days 
from 8 to 9 a.m. and 3 to 5 p.m. The 
Yucaipa Branch is open Monday 7 to 9 
p.m. and Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 
2.30 to 5 p.m. 

Caroline S. Waters, Lib'n. 

Atolia. 

Atolia. Branch, San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Big Bear Valley (P. O. Pine Knot; no 
exp. office). 

Big Bear Valley Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

California Junior Republic (P. O. 

Chino; exp. Pomona). 

California Junior Republic Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Camp Baldy (Exp. Upland). 

Camp Baldy Branch, San Bernar- 
dino Co. Free Library. 

See note under &an Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Morongo (P. O. Banning; exp. White- 
water). 

Morongo Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Pinecrest (No exp. office). 

Pinecrest Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

Redlands. 

A. K. Smiley [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs Frederick W. Sanborn, Lib'n. 

Miss Elizabeth Lowry was married Oct. 
27 to Mr Frederick W. Sanborn of River- 
side. 

University of Redlands Library and 
Deposit Station, A. K. Smiley Public 
Library. Victor L. Duke, Pres. Eleanor 
A. Symmes, Lib'n. 

To the Science Department has been 
added 34 volumes purchased from the late 
Professor George Robertson. The Modern 
Language Department has been enriched 
by books purchased by Professor Edith A. 
Hill while in France and Spain. 

The members of the Library Committee 
acknowledge with gratitude gifts from the 
following : From the A. K. Smiley Public 
Library, Government documents and pam- 
phlets (duplicates to their collection) ; 
from Mrs Junius Hill, 15 volumes and 
103 bound magazines from the library of 
the late Professor Junius Hill of Welles- 
ley College; from Mrs F. E. Walker of 
Long Beach, 86 volumes from the library 
of the late Dr F. E. Walker. 

Eleanor A. Symmes, Lib'n. 

Strawberry Flats (P. O. Twin Peaks; 
no exp. office). 

Strawberry Flats Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Trona (Exp. via Searles). 

Trona Branch, San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Westend. 
Westend Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library, was established Nov. 2, 
1921. 



Yucaipa. 

Yucaipa Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



73 



SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 
County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 112,248. 
Assessed valuation $90,431,293 (tax- 
able for county $S0,936,S02). 

San Diego Co. Feee Library, San 
Diego. Miss Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

The County Library kept "open house" 
for the teachers during the County Insti- 
tute Dec. 19 to 22. Special exhibits of 
supplementary material on several differ- 
ent subjects were arranged to show the 
correlation of stereographs, pictures and 
music records with the printed text. At- 
tention was called also to the picture col- 
lection and to the new books of profes- 
sional interest. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished in the following school districts : 
Banner, Libby, Pomerado Union, Soledad 
and Tenaja Joint. 

Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

Banner School Dist. (P. O. Julian). 
Banner School Dist. Branch, San 
Diego Co. Free Library, was established 
during the quarter. Miss Nellie Needham, 
Custodian. 

Libby School Dist. (P. O. San Luis 
Rey). 

Libby School Dist. Branch, San 
Diego Co. Free Library, was established 
during the quarter. Mrs Julia F. War- 
ren, Custodian. 

Pomerado Union School Dist. (P. O. 
Escondido). 
Pomerado Union School Dist. 
Branch, San Diego Co. Free Library, 
was established during the quarter. Mrs 
Fannie W. Goddard, Custodian. 

San Diego. 

La Jolla Library Association Li- 
brary and BRANCn of San DiegoT. L. 
Miss Irene Eckis, Lib'n. 

With an elaborate reception to the pub- 
lic, the new memorial library building at 
La Jolla, erected at a cost of more than 
$42,000, was opened October 10, marking 
the successful completion of the efforts of 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
San Diego — Continued, 
the trustees of the La Jolla Library Asso- 
ciation. 

In connection with the library opening 
there was shown in the art room an exhi- 
bition of 53 paintings and drawings, the 
work of about 20 of the members of the 
La Jolla Art Association. The pictures 
shown are highly creditable. La Jolla has 
never - had a suitable spot to show art 
works despite the fact that numerous art- 
ists are found here. — San Diego Union, 
O 11 

Soledad School Dist. (P. O. Del Mar). 
Soledad School Dist. Branch, San 
Diego Co. Free Library, was established 
during the quarter. Mrs May B. Roller, 
Custodian. 

Tenaja Joint School Dist. (P. O. Mur- 
rietta) . 
Tenaja Joint School Dist. Branch, 
San Diego Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. Mrs Grace 
Vannoy, Custodian. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 
City and county coterminous. 
Area, 43 sq. mi. Pop. 506,676. 
Assessed valuation, $869,187,114 (tax- 
oble for county $609,884,624). 



§San Francisco Law Library. James 
H. Deering, Lib'n. 

Alfred John Nagle, who for the past 
twenty years was assistant librarian at 
the San Francisco Law Library, died Oct. 
25, 1921. He was stricken with paralysis 
Oct. 12. — San Francisco Chronicle, O 29 

Sutro Branch, California State 
Library. Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Lib'n. Mrs Laura Steffens Suggett, 
Branch Lib'n. 

Some very interesting San Francisco 
material came in during the quarter. One 
unique gift is the beginning of a collection 
of prints from the Pictorial Photographic 
Society of San Francisco. The first in- 
stallment of the collection was eighteen 
very beautiful examples of pictorial photog- 



74 



news notes op calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



San Francisco — Continued. 

raphy, a large number of which is of 
scenes in or near San Francisco. The 
collection does not as yet include examples 
of the work of all members of this Society 
and it is expected that prints will be added 
from time to time. 

The Society is willing that these prints 
should be loaned for exhibit purposes, 
through any California tax-supported li- 
brary, if any local group is interested in 
pictorial photography. Without doubt, the 
prints would be an inspiration to anyone 
working along this special line of photog- 
raphy either as a professional photographer 
or as an amateur. 

From Mr Henry Root was received a 
copy of his recently printed biography. 
The book is San Francisco historical 
material from two important points of 
view. It gives, and will help to preserve, 
a clear picture of Mr Root and the im- 
portant place he filled, and is still filling. 
in San Francisco. It also sets down al- 
most as an official record, an important 
part of the story of the development of 
transportation to and in San Francisco. 

As the space in the Commonwealth Club 
quarters available for the club's library is 
becoming greatly crowded, it has been de- 
cided to dispose of some of the inactive 
research material, placing it, in every 
case, in some cooperating library, so that 
it can be borrowed for club uses if needed 
at any future time. Some is being offered 
to the San Francisco Public Library, some 
to the State Library and some to the 
Sutro Branch of the State Library, accord- 
ing to which can make the most far-reach- 
ing use of it. 

The cooperation of California libraries 
has been demonstrated during the quarter 
also by a gift from the Santa Barbara 
Public Library of a family history which 
will be frequently used in the Sutro 
Branch genealogical section, and which 
probably would have had almost no chance 
of being used except very occasionally in 
a city and county library. 

A survey of the Spanish material in the 
Sutro Library was made recently by 
Professor Aurelio Macedonio Espinosa, 
Head of the Department of Romanic lan- 
guages at Stanford University. After his 



San Francisco — Continued. 
visit to the Sutro Branch, he expressed 
himself as follows : 

"The collection is especially good in late 
18th and early 19th century Mexican his- 
tory and politics, religious history, etc. 
The Cervantes collection is also good, and 
there are a good many interesting editions 
of the works of Santa Teresa and other 
lGth century Spanish classic arts. In my 
own field the most valuable books are the 
three ISth cent. Isopos. They are really 
a rare and extraordinary find and I shall 
make full use of the three very soon.'' 
Laura Steffens Suggett, 

Branch Lib'n. 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 

County seat, Stockton. 
' Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 79,905. 

Assessed valuation $110,791,099 (tax- 
able for county $97,593,686). 

San Joaquin Co. Free Library, 
Stockton. H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. Miss 
Ida E. Condit, in charge. 

The circulation for 1921, including 
Stockton, increased by 05,000, or 25 per 
cent. Both Stockton and the county at 
large showed the same proportional gain : 
25 per cent. Total circulation was 333,- 
111, of which 181 .067 was in Stockton, 
and 142,083 outside. 

These figures do not include schools, no 
attempt having been made to record the 
school circulation. The actual number of 
books sent is now the only school figure 
recorded. 

H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. 



Stockton. 

§±Stockton Free Public Library. 
H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. 

A walking book from Brobdingnag has 
made its appearance upon the busy side- 
walks of Stockton with the hope of estab- 
lishing a closer link between the library 
and the wide world. This colossal book, 
measuring four feet high, two and a half 
wide and fifteen inches thick, is con- 
structed of a light wooden frame covered 
with sign cloth and hinged at the back. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



75 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued. 
On one side appears this timely admoni- 
tion : "Be Wise — Time Flies — Use Your 
Public Library." Perched on the "T" of 
"Time" is Mr Owl twirling a time-piece 
about by its fob. while from the corner of 
his eyes he surveys his handiwork. On 
the other cover is a cartoon of a delighted 
business man, holding a book, the title of 
which reads "Do it with books.'' Below 
this, appears once again, "U/se Your 
Public Library."' On the rounded back of 
this huge tome, in their respective panels. 
are lettered the" title, the author's name, 
and the mark of ownership, as follows : 
"Any Book You Need" — "By Ann OThor- 
ity" — "Public Library.*' The front edge 
of the book is painted to represent the 
edge of leaves. When opened, the follow- 
ing cloth poster is displayed : 

TRADE 

with your 
FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Y'ear 'Round Discount 
100% 

All Books Guaranteed 

Taken Back or Exchanged 

If Not Satisfactory 

ASK FOR TRIAL SAMPLE 

This poster is attached to the open edges 
of the book, and supported across the top 
by a strip of tempered steel which springs 
inwardly, taking in the slack when book 
is closed. 

A ten-year-old boy inside the giant book, 
faces the forward edge while carrying it 
slung from his shoulders by straps, in 
such a way that only his legs from the 
knee down are visible. His hands rest 
upon handles directly in front of him, by 
means of which he can open and shut the 
book at will. A peep-hole enables him to 
see ahead. 

As only one appearance of this walking 
advertisement has been made, it is too 
soon to reckon results, but the indications 
are that this book from Brobdinsnag is 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued, 
attracting almost as much attention as 
Gulliver himself among the Lilliputians. 

The Camp Fire Girls carried on a com- 
petition during Children's Book Week in 
which honors were awarded to each girl 
who introduced five or more new children 
into using the library. The Camp Fire 
Girls were granted the privilege of en- 
dorsing the applications of their recruits 
and were also given Jessie Wilcox colored 
post cards for mailing to parents of pros- 
pective candidates in order to assist the 
respective workers in their campaigning. 
These cards were mimeographed with in- 
vitations to visit the book exhibit and 
bring the children along. 

H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 
County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3500 sq. mi. Pop. 21.S93. 
Assessed valuation $36,101,472 (taxable 
for county $31,916,037). 

San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, 
San Luis Obispo. Miss Flo A. Gantz, 
Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
'ished in the following school districts : 
Bethel. Central, Huasna, Iron Springs, 
Josephine, Linne, Lopez Canyon, Los 
Osos, San Marcos and Washington. 

Miss Mary Kent, graduate of the Indian- 
apolis Library School and formerly of 
the Indianapolis Public Library staff, has 
been appointed to fill the place of first 
assistant. Miss Thelma Brackett. former 
first assistant, is now County Librarian 
of Siskiyou County. 

The joint teachers' institute of Monte- 
rey, San Luis Obispo, San Benito and 
Santa Cruz counties, held at Santa Cruz 
in October, was very interesting and in- 
structive. The county librarians of all 
four counties were present. Monterey and 
San Luis Obispo counties had exhibits of 
uew books on the school manuals and 
many of the distant teachers found it a 
great help. 

Flo A. Gantz, Lib'n. 



76 



news notes op calipornia LIBRARIES. [January, 1922 



SAN LUIS OBISPO CO.— Continued. 

Bethel School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 

Paso Robles). 

Bethel School Dist. Branch, San 

Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 

established in November, 1921. 

Central School Dist. (P. O. Cayucos). 
Central School Dist. Branch, San 
Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 
established in November, 1921. 

Huasna School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Arroyo Grande). 

Huasna School Dist. Branch, San 
Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 
established in November, 1921. 

Iron Springs School Dist. (P. O. 
Creston). 

Iron Springs School Dist. Branch, 
San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 
established in November, 1921. 

Josephine School Dist. (P. O. Tem- 
pleton). 
Josephine School Dist. Branch, San 
Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 
established Dec. 5, 1921. 

Linne. 
Linne School Dist. Branch, San 
Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in November, 1921. 

Lopez Canyon School Dist. (P. O. and 
exp. Arroyo Grande). 
Lopez Canyon School Dist. Branch, 
San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 
established in October, 1921. 

Los Osos School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
San Luis Obispo). 
Los Osos School Dist. Branch, San 
Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 
established in October, 1921. 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Luis Obispo Free Public Li- 
brary. Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

The librarian gave an address to the 
students of the High School on Library 



SAN LUIS OBISPO CO.— Continued. 
San Luis Obispo — Continued. 
Spirit and the Care of Books which has 
borne excellent results. 

The Thanksgiving story hour held at 
the library was attended by one hundred 
children from the first, second and third 
grades. Stories were told by the librarian 
and the assistant and Victrola records of 
stories and recitations were used, all of 
which the children greatly enjoyed. 

Miss Anita Smith resigned as assistant 
January 1 to take up work in the Uni- 
versity of California. Miss Marie Llall is 
serving a three months 1, apprenticeship 
for the position. 

Children's Book Week was even more 
successful than last year. Addresses to 
clubs, Parent-Teachers' Associations, and 
schools elicited much interest in the ex- 
hibit of standard juveniles in attractive 
editions held in the library, where lists 
were ready for all inquirers. 

Abbie S. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

California Polytechnic School Li- 
brary. R. W. Ryder, Director. M. 
Skarstedt, Lib'n. 

The present librarian of the California 
Polytechnic School is Mr M. Skarstedt. 

San Marcos School Dist. (P. O. and 
exp. San Miguel). 
San Marcos School Dist. Branch, 
San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 
established in October, 1921. 

Washington School Dist. (P. O. San 

Simeon). 
Washington School Dist. Branch, 
San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 
established Dec. 5, 1921. 



SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 
County seat, Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 36,781. 
Assessed valuation $39,064,733 (tax- 
able for county $35,915,569). 

San Mateo Co. Free Library, Red- 
wood City. Miss Edna Holroyd, Lib*n. 

Miss Lalla Bedford, first assistant in 
the San Mateo County Free Library, is 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



77 



SAN MATEO CO.— Continued. 

on leave of absence for an indefinite 
period. 

A deposit of books has been placed in 
the rooms of the San Mateo County Clinic 
and will be changed from time to time. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished in the following school districts : 
Hillsborough, Pomponio and Seaside. 
The two latter branches also serve the 
community. 

Edna Holroyd, Lib'n. 

Hillsborough (P. O. and exp. San 

Mateo). 

HILLSBOROUGH SCHOOL DlST. BRANCH, 

San Mateo Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished Nov. 2, 1921. R. L. Crane, Jr., 
Custodian. 

Pomponio School Dist. (P. O. San 
G-regorio, care Miss Evelyn Rose). 
Pomponio School Dist. Branch, San 

Mateo Co. Free Library, was established 

Oct. 10, 1921. 

Pomponio Branch, San Mateo Co. 
Free Library, was established Oct. 10, 
1921. 

Seaside School Dist. (P. ,0. San Gre- 
gorio, care Miss Bertha Halliday). 
Seaside School Dist. Branch, San 

Mateo Co. Free Library, was established 

Oct. 10, 1921. 

Seaside Branch, San Mateo Co. 
Free Library, was established Oct. 10, 
1921. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 41,097. 
Assessed valuation $56,934,231 (taxable 
for county $49,252,150). 

Santa Barbara Co. Free Library. 
Santa Barbara. Mrs Frances B. Linn, 
Lib'n. 

Miss Frances Fuller joined the staff 
November 15. Miss Katharine Kendig re- 
turned to her work November 15 after 
a six months' leave. 



SANTA BARBARA CO.— Continued. 

Under the auspices of the Woman's 
Club, monthly book reviews and discus- 
sions will be given in the library. 

In November our attention was given 
to children's books and in observance of 
Better Book Week, Miss Ethel Sawyer, 
Director of the Training Class, Portland 
Library Association, spoke ou the prin- 
ciples underlying the selection of good 
books for younger readers. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished in Artesia and Olive school districts. 
Frances B. Linn, Lib'n. 

Artesia School Dist. 
Artesia School Dist. Branch, Santa 
Barbara Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

Olive School Dist. 
Olive School Dist. Branch, Santa 
Barbara Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 
County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop. 100,588. 
Assessed valuation $115,933,819 (tax- 
able for county $96,497,995). 

Santa Clara Co. Free Library, San 
Jose. Miss Stella Huntington, Lib'n. 

Miss Marguerite Blain, our valuable 
substitute, was married October 21 to 
Mr Elmer A. Bush and is living in Sacra- 
mento. On the evening of October 8 we 
had a very jolly party at the library for 
Miss Blain, "our first library bride." 

The librarian talked to Miss Sours' 
classes in rural education at the State 
Teachers' College December 9 and 11 on 
the work of the County Library in the 
rural schools and communities. She 
talked to the teachers at the Teachers' 
Institute, Oct. 8, on the problems of books 
in the schools. 

Mrs Henshall made us a visit October 7 
and we enjoyed her as we always do. 
Stella Huntington, Lib'n. 



78 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 

Campbell. 

Campbell Union High School Li- 
brary. D. H. Cramer, Prin. Miss Mar- 
guerite C. Ryan, Lib'n. 

The Campbell Union High School Li- 
brary has begun a period of renewed activ- 
ity during the past three months. We 
have received eighty-six new books in 
addition to the purchase of the Americana. 
At the last meeting of the P. T. A. the 
women started a book drive and through 
this we hope to increase appreciably our 
library. 

Marguerite C. Ryan, Lib'n. 

Palo Alto. 

Palo Alto [Free] Public Lirbary. 
Miss Frances D. Patterson, Lib'n. 

The main event of the past three months 
was the campaign for a $40,000 bond issue 
to enlarge the present library. On Nov. 
loth the bonds went through with flying 
colors. We expect to begin building about 
March 1. 

The library is again responsible for the 
Thursday evening lecture at the Com- 
munity House ; arrangements have been 
made to have one week an Open Forum ; 
one devoted to Current Events, and the 
other evenings to lectures. 

Frances D. Patterson, Lib'n. 

San Jose. 

§|| San Jose Free Public Library. 
Charles F. Woods, Lib'n. 

The board of trustees has created the 
position of reference librarian and has 
appointed to fill it Miss Margaret Stauffer. 
lately a graduate of the University of 
Wisconsin and with training and experi- 
ence there and at the Normal School at 
Superior, Wisconsin, and at other li- 
baries. With this additional help and a 
considerably increased appropriation for 
the current fiscal year, beginning Decem- 
ber 1, the outlook for the library appears 
more hopeful. 

Charles F. Woods, Lib'n. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth class.) 
County sea*, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 26,209. 
Assessed valuation $23,733,025 (tax- 
able for county $20,743,455). 



SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 13,311. 
Assessed valuation $20,045,005 (tax- 
able for county $15,874,085). 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Downieville. 
Area, 957 sq. mi. Pop. 1783. 
Assessed valuation $2,930,890 (taxable 
for' county $2,541,305). 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(Thirty-third class.) 
County seat, Yreka. 
Area, 6079 sq. mi. Pop. 18,545. 
Assessed valuation $28,312,556 (taxable 
for county $21,375,305). 

Siskiyou Co. Fbee Library, Yreka. 
Miss Thelma Brackett, Lib'n. 

Much visiting of branches has-been done 
the past three months. In all, 37 schools 
and 21 community branches were visited. 
In this county, where travel is difficult, 
trips are made with other county officials. 
The school superintendent, the county 
nurse, the county horticulturist, have all 
done unusual cooperative work. 

The changes in custodians go merrily on. 
Weed Branch changed hands twice in a 
month. It is hoped that no new custo- 
dian will be needed there for some time. 
The location is ideal now for service, the 
library being situated in the only candy 
and ice cream shop in the town. Mon- 
tague Branch has reopened in Chas. 
Schock and Sons' dry goods store, and 
gives every promise of living up to its 
possibilities. Hilt Branch also has 
changed hands. A deposit station was 
established at the Ball home, with Mrs 
Lottie A. Ball as custodian. 

A comparison of work turned out in 
September of this year with that of last 
year proved interesting. With the same 
girls in the school department, but with 
an additional room to facilitate the work, 
over 1300 more school books were sent 
out. almost 3000 more special requests 
were filled, and other material sent out 
increased more than 2000. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



79 



SISKIYOU CO.— Continued. 

The library was singularly fortunate in 
having a six-day visit from Mrs May Dex- 
ter Henshall, who was in Yreka from the 
20th to the 25th of November. Rainy 
weather prevented the visiting of branches, 
but plans were laid for another visit next 
fall, when (it is hoped) Mrs Henshall 
will go on a visiting trip to the far cor- 
ners of the county, and be convinced that 
Siskiyou is the most beautiful county in 
California. 

Inspired by the enthusiasm of Mrs Hen- 
shall's visit, the library cheerfully under- 
took rather unusual work for its patrons. 
On one occasion an eight-foot Christmas 
tree was bought and shipped to the south- 
ern part of the state ; on another a mar- 
riage was successfully engineered for "two 
young things." The library's motto seems 
to have become, "We tackle anything 1 .*' 

The librarian had the good fortune to 
attend the State Library's clever Christ- 
mas party, presided over by a delightfully 
genial and witty Santa Claus. 

On her return home, after a three 
weeks' absence, she found a crippled crew 
managing the library bark. Miss DeWitt 
was ill, and was sent home for a week. 
Miss "Wheeler had iritis, though not se- 
verely, and had to go to Grant's Pass for 
treatments. Miss Berry, who had been 
substituting for Miss DeWitt during the 
illness and death of her mother, had als) 
been out with eye strain. Miss Revell 
had fallen and broken a finger of her right 
hand. For all of these misfortunes, th • 
bark was sailing a straight course. Th i 
crew is all improving, and will undoubt- 
edly recover in time. 

Thelma Brackett, Lib'n. 



Ball Home Deposit (P. O. Cecilville). 

Ball Homs Deposit Station, Siski- 
you Co. Free Library, was established 
during the quarter. 

Hilt. 

Hilt Branch, Siskiyou Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Siskiyou Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



SISKIYOU CO.— Continued. 

Montague. 

Montague Branch, Siskiyou Co. Free 
Library. 

Sec note under Siskiyou Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Weed. 

Weed Branch, Siskiyou Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Siskiyou Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 

County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 40,602. 
Assessed valuation $34,570,425 (tax- 
able for county $29,62S,033) . 

Solano Co. Free Library, Fairfield. 
Miss Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 

The Solano County Free Library has 
been busy making school visits in connec- 
tion with the County Music Supervisor to 
most of the rural schools. 

( 'bildren's Book Week was observed in 
almost every town of Solano County. Dis- 
plays of special editions, wonderful illus- 
trators, boys' and girls' favorites, outdoor 
stories, poetry for children, animal stories 
and others accompanied by pretty posters 
made up some of the displays exhibited at 
Vacaville Public, Dixon Public, Fairfield 
and Suisun Branches. Stories from the 
Arabian Nights Entertainments were told 
in about thirty schools as well as in the 
above mentioned towns. The tales were 
unusually and heartily appreciated since 
the story teller appeared in costume. 

During the holiday about twenty schools 
were visited where displays of Christmas 
literature and Christmas stories and songs 
made up the program. Holiday programs 
with stories and phonograph records ap- 
propriate to the occasion were held in 
Vacaville and Fairfield. 

The librarian gave talks to the Fairfield 
and South Vallejo Parent Teacher Asso- 
ciation and the Suisun Wednesday Club 
on the history of the Christmas Carol. 
Clara B. Dills, Lib'n. 



80 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



SOLANO CO.— Continued. 

Miss Clara B. Dills, County Librarian, 
has been granted a sixty-day leave of ab- 
sence by the Board of Supervisors to make 
an extended trip to the Orient. During 
her absence the County Free Library will 
be under the management of Miss Mar- 
jorie Chilberg. — Sacramento Bee, Ja 6 

Dixon. 

Dixon Union High ScnooL Dist. 
Library and Branch, Solano Co. Free 
Library. Miss Leta Hutchinson, Lib'n. 

See note under Solano Co. Free Library. 

Fairfield. 

Fairfield Branch, Solano Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Solano Co. Free Library. 

Suisun. 

Suisun Branch, Solano Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Solano Co. Free Library. 

Vacaville. 

Vacaville Union High School Li- 
brary District Library and Branch, 
Solano Co. Free Library. Miss Nan 
Reese, Lib'n. 

See note under Solano Co. Free Library. 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 
County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 51,990. 
Assessed valuation $53,335,210 (tax- 
able for county $47,353,940). 

Healdsburg. 

Healdsburg High School Library. 
E. R. Morehead, Prin. Gertrude Bon- 
ham, Lib'n. 

To our High School Library we have 
added 274 volumes including two sets of 
encyclopedias. The new International 
was added by purchase ; Chambers' En- 
cyclopedia was a gift from Mr Beck. 
Seven volumes of National Geographic 
Magazines have been bound and fourteen 
library volumes were rebound. The aver- 
age circulation is 200 volumes per month. 
We take eighteen magazines. 

Gertrude Bonham, Lib'n. 



SONOMA CO.— Continued. 

Santa Rosa. 

J § Santa Rosa Free Public Library. 
Miss Margaret Adelle Barnett, Lib'n. 

The private library of the late Rev P. 
C. Laverton Harris, formerly pastor of 
the Fulton Presbyterian Church, has been 
donated to the Santa Rosa Free Public 
Library by the heirs. The library consists 
of 500 volumes of a general character. — 
Santa Rosa Press-Democrat, N 4 



STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth class.) 
County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 14S6 sq. mi. Pop. 43,557. 
Assessed valuation $58,022,514 (tax- 
able for county $51,386,510) . 

Stanislaus Co. Free Library, Mo- 
desto. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

The County Librarian has been acting 
as a sort of "clearing house" for enter- 
tainment material for the various farm 
centers and during the past quarter has 
supplied three centers with vocalists, pian- 
ists, readers and a community chorus and 
game leader. 

The home of the custodian of the 
Knights Ferry Branch, "The Porch 
Branch," burned Oct. 28. The books, be- 
ing on the porch, were saved and the 
bookcases moved to the house next door 
where it will continue as a "Porch 
Branch" in charge of Mrs B. M. Bartlett. 

A branch was established at the Indus- 
trial Camp at Don Pedro Dam, October 
19. This branch will serve the men, while 
the school branch served by Tuolumne 
County Free Library will care for the 
Family Camp, "Ragtown." The branch is 
located in the Recreational Hall and the 
custodian, Hugh S. McVicar, reports good 
interest in it and excellent care of the 
books. A selection of magazines is sent 
to them each month from the main library 
also. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished in the following school districts : 
Grayson, Rowe and Tegner. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn, Libn. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



81 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 
Don Pedro Dam. 
Don Pedeo Dam Branch, Stanislaus 
Co. Free Library, was established Oct. 
19, 1921. 

Grayson School Dist. (P. O. Westley). 
Grayson School Dist. Branch, Stan- 
islaus Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished Oct. 11, 1921. 

Knights Ferry (No exp. office). 

Knights Ferry Branch, Stanislaus 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under Stanislaus Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Rowe School Dist. (P. O. Montpellier). 
Rowe School Dist. Branch, Stan- 
islaus County Free Library, was estab- 
lished Oct. 4, 1921. 

Tegner School Dist. (P. O. Turlock). 
Tegner School Dist. Branch, Stanis- 
laus Co. Free Library, was established 
Oct. 20, 1921. 



SUTTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class.) 
County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, 611 sq. mi. Pop. 10,115. 
Assessed valuation $21,732,757 (tax- 
able for county $18,241,155). 

Sutter Co. Free Library, Yuba City. 
Miss Edna J. Hewitt, Lib'n. 

Children's Book Week was observed in 
Sutter County and the entire program of 
the Children's Book Week Committee was 
carried out. The program made for the 
women's clubs was given by one of the 
local clubs. Some very interesting talks 
were given by different ladies and after 
the program everybody was interested in 
an exhibit of beautifully illustrated chil- 
dren's books that were furnished by our 
library. During the entire week we ex- 
hibited books in the library. We had a 
Thomas Aldrich Bookcase made by one 
of our high schools and this played an 
important part in our exhibit. Plans for 
making the bookcase were given away to 
anybody interested. During the week, our 
local church secured the picture "Snow 
White" and over one hundred children 

6—16230 



SUTTER CO.— Continued. 

were able to see this picture. The last 
day ended with a story hour in our library. 
This is the first story hour we have been 
able to have. It was conducted by the 
local kindergarten teacher. Over sixty 
children from different parts of the county 
attended. 

The Board of Supervisors has purchased 
a Buick car for the offices of County 
Superintendent of Schools and County 
Librarian. 

Edna J. Hewitt, Lib'n. 



TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 12,882. 
Assessed valuation $19,841,981 (taxable 
for county $16,967,555). 

Tehama Co. Free Library, Red 
Bluff. Miss Elizabeth Stevens, Lib'n. 

In October Miss Cornelia Provines, Li- 
brarian of Sacramento County Free Li- 
brary, Miss Maude Middleton, Librarian 
of Glenn County Free Library, and Mrs 
Dorothy Brenton, assistant librarian of 
Glenn County, were visitors at the library. 

During Children's Book Week there was 
a collection of children's books on exhibit 
at the main library. Keen interest was 
manifested on the part of parents and 
children throughout the week and the ex- 
hibit table was surrounded by visitors. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall visited the 
library Nov. 14 and 15. On November 14 
she spent the time with the staff at head- 
quarters and in going over the future 
quarters of the library in the new court- 
house. Nov. 15 Mrs Henshall and Miss 
Stevens visited the Proberta, Oak Park, 
Richfield and Independent schools and the 
Kirkwood and Vina branch libraries. 

During the week of Oct. 3 to 8 the li- 
brary maintained a reading room at the 
county fair. This service was greatly ap- 
preciated by the visitors at the fair and 
the resultant library publicity has brought 
forth a petition from the people of the 
Richfield district in which they ask that 
a community branch be established at 
Richfield. A county map showing the 



82 



news notfs of California libraeies. [January, 1922 



TEHAMA CO.— Continued, 
distributing points for county library 
service and a graphic chart showing the 
history of the growth, circulation and in- 
come of the library were the source of 
much interest. 

One change of custodians was made dur- 
ing the quarter. Miss Josephine Bowman 
resigned as custodian of the Bowman 
Branch Dec. 15 and Mrs Charles Kloose 
succeeded her. 

Forty-two visits to schools and branches 
were made during the quarter. 

Elizabeth Stevens, Lib'n. 

Mrs Geraldine Work resigned her posi- 
tion as County Librarian Jan. 1G, 1922. 
The Board of Supervisors appointed Miss 
Elizabeth Stevens to the position. 

Bowman (P. O. Cottonwood; no exp. 
office). 

Bowman Branch, Tehama Co. Feee 
Library. 

See note under Tehama Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Red Bluff. 

§||Herbert Kraft Free [Public] 
Library. Miss Alice M. Hughes, Lib'n. 

Miss A. M. Hughes, Librarian of the 
Kraft Free Library, has resigned her posi- 
tion, the resignation to take effect in Feb- 
ruary.— Red Bluff News, D 30 



TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth class.) 
County seat, Wteaverville. 
Area, 3276 sq. mi. Pop. 2551. 
Assessed valuation $3,844,235 (taxable 
for county $3,524,755). 



TULARE COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4863 sq. mi. Pop. 59,031. 
Assessed valuation $81,738,864 (tax- 
able for county $67,240,3S0) . 

Tulare Co. Free Library, Visalia. 
Miss Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Due to a reduction in the salaries of 
the assistants at the main office three resig- 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 

nations were received in October. Miss 
Dorothy Thompson, cataloger, resigned to 
accept a position in the Los Angeles Pub- 
lic Library, Miss Marjorie Morse has 
joined the staff of the Fresno County Free 
Library and Miss Margaret Jarvis re- 
turned to the Middle West where she is 
now employed in the South Bend Public- 
Library. Mrs Delta Luce resigned her 
position in the library November 1. Mrs 
Luce has gone to the Hawaiian Islands 
where she will reside for an indefinite time. 

At the November meeting the Board of 
Supervisors raised the salaries of the main 
office assistants, reinstating the schedule 
which was in effect previous to August 1, 
with one exception. The salary of the 
children's librarian was increased from 
$125 to $150. 

November 19 the new Carnegie building 
for the Orosi Branch was formally opened. 
Ex-Senator M. B. Harris of Fresno spoke 
to the friends of the library in the First 
Methodist Church. Later a reception was 
held in the library where members of the 
Woman's Improvement Club of Orosi, who 
contributed $2000 to the building fund, 
assisted as hostesses and served refresh- 
ments. 

During the San Joaquin Valley Citrus 
Fair books were displayed in the County 
Library booth on various subjects of in- 
terest to the growers of the valley. Visit- 
ors were encouraged to examine the books 
and leave requests for special titles. Fol- 
lowing the fair a list of books on agri- 
culture in the county library was printed 
and distributed. 

Mrs Joe Mitchell has succeeded Mr E. L. 
Haskell as custodian of the Hot Springs 
Branch. Sultana Branch was reopened 
October 3 with Mrs Lois Wilson in charge 
as custodian. Two schools, Alila and 
Hope, joined the county library during the 
quarter. 

Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 



Alila School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Earlimart). 

Alila School Dist. Branch, Tulare 
Co. Free Library, was established Oct. 
13, 1921. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



83 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 
Hope School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 

Terra Bella). 
Hope School Dist. Branch, Tulare 
Co. Free Library, was established Oct. 4, 
1921. 

Hot Springs (Exp. Ducor). 

Hot Springs Branch, Tulare Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Tulare Co. Free Library. 

Orosi (Exp. Cutler). 

Orosi Branch, Tulare Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Tulare Co. Free Library. 

Sultana. 

Sultana Branch, Tulare Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Tulare Co. Free Library. 



TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 77G8. 
Assessed valuation $11,568,968 (taxable 
for county $8,515,256). 

Tuolumne Co. Free Library, Sonora. 
Miss Helen M. Rowland, Lib'n. 

The Board of Supervisors raised the 
salary of the Assistant Librarian, Miss 
Alma Fitch, from $75 to $S5 a t month, 
commencing January 1, 1922. 

The small room adjoining the County 
Library headquarters in the courthouse is 
to be lined with shelves which will be 
utilized for storing school text books. 

Arastraville School District has joined 
the County Library system, leaving five 
districts which do not belong. 

On petition from the inmates of the 
County Jail some books and other reading 
matter were sent to them the first of the 
year. This service will be continued 
throughout the year to the changing popu- 
lation. 

Children's Book Week was observed in 
several ways. An exhibit of the best edi- 
tions of the standard children's classics 
and the various lovely holiday children's 
books was held in the Sonora Public Li- 
brary. Window advertisements and suit- 
able announcements were made of this 



TUOLUMNE CO.— Continued, 
exhibit, and the price and place where 
the books could be the most conveniently 
purchased was noted in the book. A col- 
lection was also sent to the Women's Club 
for inspection. A number of the women 
availed themselves of the opportunity and 
orders were sent for suitable children's 
books for Christmas gifts. The County 
Librarian offered a prize of a book to the 
Eighth Grade child in the county writing 
the best essay entitled "The book I like 
best." All of the thirty-two schools re- 
sponded splendidly. Willard Mills, a four- 
teen-year-old boy of Sonora, writing on 
"Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the 
Sea," by Jules Verne, won the prize, the 
Houghton Mifflin edition of Dana's "Two 
Years Before the Mast." The Librarian 
will make this an annual contest. 

George Wharton James made a visit to 
the County Library early in October. He 
expects to write a book on the Bret Harte 
country in the near future and will make 
Sonora his headquarters while acquiring 
the necessary data. 

Miss Bessie Silverthorn, Librarian of 
Stanislaus County Free Library, and her 
mother, made a trip to Sonora Sunday, 
October 9. 

Helen M. Bowland, Lib'n. 

Arastraville School Dist. (P. O. and 

exp. Tuolumne). 
Arastraville School Dist. Branch, 
Tuolumne Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished Dec. 15, 1921. 



VENTURA COUNTY. 

( Twenty-third class. ) 
County seat, Ventura. 
Area, 1S50 sq. mi. Pop. 28,724. 
Assessed valuation $49,443,611 (taxable 
for county $43,396,706). 

Ventura Co. Free Library, Ventura. 
Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

During children's week the library had 
an exhibition of children's books in two 
book stores in Ventura. Copies of the 
Children's Catalog of 3500 books are 
placed in both stores as a permanent loan 
for use of clerks and customers. 



84 



news notes op calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 

In December Miss Anna Jean Thomson, 
first assistant, resigned to be married to 
Mr Ruel Lewis. The marriage is to take 
place Jan. 7. Miss Dora McKinlay takes 
the place of Miss Thomson, and Miss Mar- 
jorie Harrington, head cataloger in East 
Cleveland, Ohio, will take Miss McKin- 
lay's place. Miss Eileen McCandless is 
acting as temporary assistant. 

At the last meeting of the supervisors 
the salaries of the staff were raised, the 
first assistant to $125, the cataloger to 
$90 which, with the $25 she receives from 
the city, makes $115 a month ; the third 
assistant to $85 and the assistant in the 
Ventura City Library to $85. This last 
raise was made by the Library Board of 
the Ventura City Library. 

A class of seventeen girls has been or- 
ganized in the Ventura Uni'on High School 
to learn the use of the library. The class 
meets twice a week and is in charge of 
the County Librarian. 

The following have joined the County 
Library : the Ventura School District ; the 
Ventura Union High School and the 
Apache School. The Supervisors have 
established a new branch at Stauffer. 
Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

Apache School Dist. (P. O. Pattiway; 
no exp. office). 
Apache School Dist. Branch, Ven- 
tura Co. Feee Library, was established 
Oct. 1, 1921. 



Ojai. 

George Thacher Memorial Free 
Library and Ojai Branch, Ventura 
Co. Free Library. Miss Zaidee E. Soule, 
Custodian. 

By the will of the late Mrs Elise Mein- 
ers the Public Library at Ojai is to receive 
$500.— Ventura Post, N 5 



Santa Paula. 

Dean Hobbs Blanchard Memorial 
[Free Public] Library. Miss Mary 
Boynton, Lib'n. 

Mrs Helen F. Barbara has been added 
to our staff and is devoting thirteen hours 
a week to the library. She has had a little 
previous experience at the Wlidener Li- 
brary at Harvard, and her training in art 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 
Santa Paula — Continued, 
makes her very helpful to us in the making 
of posters. 

A very useful book truck has been added 
to our stock of library furniture. 

Mary Boynton, Lib'n. 

Stauffer (No exp. office). 
Stauffer Branch, Ventura Co. Free 
Library, was established Nov. 18, 1921. 

Ventura. 

|| Ventura [Free] Public Library 
and Branch, Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Florence Vandever, Lib'n. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

San Buenaventura School Dist. 
Branch, Ventura Co. Free Library, 
was established Dec. 14, 1921. 

Ventura Union High School Li- 
brary. F. A. Wagner, Prin. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



YOLO COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 17,105. 
Assessed valuation $31,309,701 (taxable 
for county $26,385,800). 

Yolo Co. Free Library, Woodland. 
Miss Nancy C. Laugenour, Lib'n. 

Mr Francis Evans was appointed cus- 
todian of Grafton Branch Nov. 1, 1921, 
to succeed Mrs Henrietta Keith. 

Esparto Union High School became a 
branch of Yolo County Free Library Dec. 
1, 1921. 

Nancy C. Laugenour, Lib'n. 

Davis. 

*University Farm School Library 
and Branch, Yolo C. Free Library. 
Thos. Tavernetti, Acting Dean. Miss 
Dorothy Deming, Acting Lib'n. 

The University Farm Library is to be 
enlarged in the immediate future, as it 
has proven itself very inadequate to meet 
the needs of the present student body. A 
large collection of new reference books is 
also to be added. 

Dorothy Deming, Acting Lib'n. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



85 



YOLO CO.— Continued. 


YUBA COUNTY. 


Esparto. 

Espaeto Union High School Libeaey. 
R. J. Werner, Prin. 


(Fortieth class.) 
County seat, Marysville. 


See note under Yolo Co. Free Library. 


Area, 625 sq. mi. Pop. 10,375. 


Grafton. 


Assessed valuation $19,961,953 (taxable 


Gkafton Beanch, Yolo Co. Feee 


for county $17,042,195) . 


Libeaey. 




See note under Yolo Co. Free Library. 


- 



86 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 192' 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



Many public libraries waste a great 
deal of time and money before they find 
good places to get supplies. The plan is 
to give all libraries the benefit of the 
experience of the older libraries of the 
State by listing under different heads the 
houses that have been found to give sat- 
isfaction, the names and addresses being 
furnished by the older and larger libraries 
of California. In this way suggestions 
will be given as to where different sorts 
of books may be bought, where books may 
be rebound or periodicals bound, where 
library furniture may be bought, etc., 
both in California and in the East. 

If any information is needed about the 
firms listed below which can not be ob- 
tained from the firms themselves, the 
names of the libraries recommending the 
different ones will be sent to any library 
upon application to the State Library. 

SUPPLIES. 

Amateur Plays. 

Acting Dramas fob Amateubs. 

The Book Den, 464 Eighth st., Oakland, 
Calif. 

A. L. A. 
Booklist. 

78 E. Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

Catalog. 
1904 ed. $1. 

Superintendent of Documents, Govern- 
ment Printing Office, Washington, 
D. C. 
1904-11 ed. $1.50. 

A. L. A. Pub. Board, 78 E. Washing- 
ton st., Chicago, 111. 

Headquartees and Publishing Boabd, 
78 E. Washington st., Chicago, 111. 

Binding and Mending. 

Binding. 

Foster & Futernick Co., 39 Battery st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 460 Fourth st, San 

Francisco,, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 210 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J st, 

Sacramento, Calif. 
Silvius and Schoenbackler, 423 J St., 

Sacramento, Calif. 
Mending. 

Stix Co., San Jose. 

Stix-Parchment mending- tissue, 



Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will 
be furnished by the State Library. 

Book Cases. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 

Hoegee Co., 138-142 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Boxes. 

Pacific Box Factory, 2600 Taylor st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Corrugated paper cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and 

Folsom sts., San Francisco, Calif. 
Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 Front 

st., Sacramento, Calif. 

Book Plates. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 West 

27th st, New York, N. Y. 
Sequoyah Studio, 319 42d st., Oakland, 

Calif. 
Times-Mirror Printing & Binding 

House, 118 S. Broadway, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Western Lithograph Co., 600-610 E» 

Second st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Pockets. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 460 Fourth st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Southern California Distributors), 

610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



87 



Book Pockets — Continued. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

The Zellerbach Paper Co., 534 Battery 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furniture, Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. T. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

Van Horn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Books. 

Baker & Taylor Co., 354 4th ave., New 
York City. 

Emporium, 835-865 Market st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Himebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

H. R. Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 330 E. Ohio st., Chicago, 111. 

McDevitt- Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st., 
New York City. 

Newbegin's, 358 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parker's Book Store (C. C. Parker), 
220 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Chas. Scribner's Sons, 5th ave. and 48th 
st., New York, N. Y. 



Boo ks — Continued. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
Union Library Association, 225 Fifth 

ave., New York City. 
Vroman's Book Store, 60 E. Colorado 

st, Pasadena. 
Harr Wagner, 112 Hearst Bldg., San 

Francisco, Calif. 

Especially western books by western authors. 

White House, Sutter st., bet. Grant ave. 
and Kearny st., San Francisco, Calif. 

English Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 
Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 

Foreign Books and Publications in 
Various Languages. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
Lemcke & Buechner, 30-32 East Twen- 
tieth st., New York City. 

French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & J. 
Delabriandais, 324 Stockton st, San 
Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, 19 Rue Scribe, Paris, 
France. 

Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 255 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif- 
Spa nish. 

Victoriano Suarez, Madrid, Spain. 

Law Books. 
Bancroft-Whitney Co., 200 McAllister 

st., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew-Bender & Co., 109 State st, 
Albany, N Y. 

School Books. 

California School Book Depository, 571 
Market st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Ginn & Co., 20 Second st, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment. 330 E. Ohio st.. Chicago. 111. 

Milton Bradley Co., 20 Second st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Owen Publishing Co.. 681 Market st. 
San F-ancisco, Calif. 

White House, Sutter st, bet. Grant ave. 
and Kearny st, San Francisco, Calif. 



88 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



Books — Continued. 
Second-Hand Books. 

McDevitt- Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church St., 

New York City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New Ox- 
ford St., London, Eng. 
Powner's Book Store, 542 Spring St., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

St., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
A. R. Womrath, 15 E. 28th St., New 

York, N. Y. 
For used fiction. 
Especially Califomiana. 

Dawson's Book Shop, 518 S. Hill St., 

Lob Angeles, Calif. 
F. M. De Witt, 1609 Telegraph ave., 

Oakland, Calif. 
Holmes Book Co., 104 Market st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 

See Fubnitube and Supplies. 

Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st, San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 

H. S. Crocker & Co., 565-571 Market 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 
Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 3,21 
Second st., San Francisco, and 626 
S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 



County Free Library Signs. 

For information, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 

Dandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent, New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 

See Fuenituee and Supplies. 

Films. 

For Rent. 

American Bed Cross, Pacific Division, 

Larkin and McAllister sts., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pathe Exchange, Inc., Non-Theatrical 

Dept, 9S5 Market st., San Francisco, 

Calif. 
United States Forest Service, Ferry 

bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 
University of California, Extension 

Division, Berkeley, Calif. 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Grimes-Stassforth Stationery Co., 737- 
739 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Desk Co., 677 Mission 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st, 
Sacramento, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st, San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



89 



Furniture and Supplies — Continued. 
Filing Cases for Music. 
Los Angeles Desk Co., 84S S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Globes. 

~- Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 
R'and-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st. ; 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 
C, F. Weber & Co., 9S5 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazine Binders. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Elbe File and Binder Co., 215-217 

Greene st., New York, N. Y. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Gem Binder Co., 65 W. Broadway, 

New York. 
Wm. G. Johnston & Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Southern California Distributors), 

610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazines. 
See Periodicals. 

Maps. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st, 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d St., New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlets and Multi-Binders and 
Pamphlet Boxes. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Pasting Machines. 
A. G. Prior, 136 Liberty st., New York, 
N. Y. 



Perforating Stamps. 
B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 
Back Volumes and Numbers. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st., 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

F. M. De Witt, 1609 Telegraph ave., 
Oakland, Calif. 

International Magazine Co., 339 Bay 
Way North, Elizabeth, N. J. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 
st., New York, N. Y. 

II. W. Wilson Co., 95S-64 University 
ave., New York City. 

Subscription Agencies. 

John A. Clow, 2925 N. Lake ave., 
Pasadena, Calif. 

Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 
Square, New York City. 

Moore-Cottrell Subscription Agencies, 
North Cohocton, N. Y. 

Mutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 
zer Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

San Francisco News Co., 747 Howard 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 
st., New York, N. Y. 

Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 Cham- 
ber of Commerce Bldg., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 
ave., New York City. 

Pictures. 

Braun & Co., Dornach, Alsace, France. 
Toni Landau Photo Co., 1 E. 45th st., 

New York, N. Y. 
(Formerly Berlin Photographic Co.) 
Curtis & Cameron, Copley Square, 

Boston, Mass. 

Especially for reproduction of American art. 

Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Vickery, Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First st, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., 131 S. 

Spring st, Los Angeles, Calif. 



90 



news notes of calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



Rubber Stamps and Type — Continued. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

st., San Francisco, Calif. 
Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks-Morse & Co., 651 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Shelf Label- Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Signs. 

Dromgold-Schroeder Co., 1033 S. Los 

Angeles st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sam H. Harris, 631 S. Spring st., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

st., San Francisco, Calif. 
Tablet & Ticket Co., 604 Mission st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Slides. 

Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Steel Stacks. 

See Book Stacks. 

Stereoscopic Views. 

Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 

Philip Brigandi (Agent Keystone View 
Co. and Underwood & Underwood), 
1618 North Hobart blvd., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Willis E. Case (Agent Keystone View 
Co. and Underwood & Underwood), 
1610 Grove st., Berkeley, Calif. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 444 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 240 Bush 
st., San Francisco, 424 S. Spring st., 
Los Angeles, and 1127 9th st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 426 S. 
Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
st., San Francisco, 430 S. Broadway, 
Los Angeles, and 611 J St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Los Angeles Library School. For full 
information, write to Librarian, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, California. 

See, also, this publication p. 58. 

Riverside Library Service School. 
For full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, California. 

Sep, also, this publication p. 69. 

University of California Course in Li- 
brary Methods. For full information 
write to Librarian, University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley, Calif. 



AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The officers of the American Library 
Association for 1921—22 are as, follows : 

Azariah S. Root, Librarian, Oberlin 
College Library, Oberlin, Ohio, President. 

Samuel H. Ranck, Librarian, Public 
Library, Grand Rapids, Mich., 1st Vice- 
President. 

Miss Claribel R. Barnett, Librarian, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture Library, 
Washington, D. C, 2d Vice-President. 

Carl H. Milam, Chicago, Secretary. 

Edward D. Tweedell, Assistant Libra- 
rian, The John Crerar Library, Chicago, 
111., Treasurer. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
STATE LIBRARIES. 

The officers of the National Associa- 
tion of State Libraries for 1921-22 are as 
follows : 

J. M. Hitt, Washington State Library, 
Seattle, President. 

Mrs Jessie Palmer Weber. Illinois State 
Historical Library, Springfield, 1st Vice- 
President. 

' Herbert O. Brigham, Librarian, Rhode 
Island State Library, Providence, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer. 

LIBRARY WORKERS ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the Library Workers 
Association for 1921-22 are as follows : 

Catherine Van Dyne, National Work- 
men's Compensation Service Bureau, New 
York City, President. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



91 



Library Workers Association — Cont'd. 

Marian C. Manley, Public Library, 
Sioux City, Iowa, Secretary. 

Carl L. Cannon, Public Library, New 
York City, Treasurer. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the School Library Asso- 
ciation for 1921-22 are : 

Northern Section — President, Miss 
Helen Price, University High School, 
Oakland. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Mary Ives, 
Fremont High School, Oakland. 

Southern Section — President, Miss 
Statie Weber, Hollywood High School, 
Los Angeles. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Margaret 
Guthrie, Orange Union High School. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
Officers. 

Mrs Marion S. Percival, '15, President. 

Miss Ellen B. Frink, '19, Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

Miss Bessie B. Heath, '19, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 
The State Library is ready to 
register all library workers in California 
who are looking for positions and all 
from outside the state who wish to come 
here. Also it will be glad to know of 
libraries that want head librarians or 
assistants in any branch of their work. 
In writing for recommendations, libraries 
are urged to be as specific as possible, 
especially in regard to time position must 
be filled and salary offered. For further 
information, write to the State Library, 
Sacramento, California. 

FOR SALE. 

Argonaut. 2 vols, and miscellaneous num- 
bers. 

Californian. 3 vols, and miscellaneous 
numbers. 



Land of Sunshine. 10 vols. 

Out West. Vol. 21. 

Overland Monthly. 20 vols., also some 
incomplete vols. 

Pacific Rural Press. 5 vols, and miscel- 
laneous numbers. 

Sunset. 25 vols. Two sets of some and 
miscellaneous numbers. 
For further information concerning 

these magazines, address Miss Jeannette 

M. Drake, Pasadena Public Library, 

Pasadena, California. 

MAGAZINES FOR DISTRIBUTION. 

Stanislaus County Free Library has 
duplicate magazines available for any 
library needing them. There are odd 
numbers of the following magazines and 
volumes : 

American. Vols. 67-70. 

American Review of Reviews. Vols. 
37-41. 

Century. Vols. 75-96. 

Everybody's. Vols. 18-23. 

Hampton's. Vols. 23-25. 

Harper's. Vols. 113, 124, 127. 

McClure's. Vols. 30-35. 

Scribner's. Vols 32, 35-38, 43-63. 

Anyone needing numbers in these 
volumes should write Miss Silverthorn for 
further particulars. There are many full 
runs of six months each. 

USED BOOKS FREE. 

The Madera County Free Library has 
a number of used copies, in good con- 
dition, of the following books : 

Benson — English derivatives. 

Boyle — Everyday bookkeeping. 

McFadden — Language series. Books 
1 and 2, Maximum course. 

Philips & Anderson — Silver-Burdett 
arithmetic. Books 1, 2 and 3. 

Wentworth & Smith — Essentials of 
arithmetic. Advanced course. With 
answers. 

Any library wishing any of these 
books may get them by paying trans- 
portation. Address Miss Julia Steffa, 
Madera County Free Library, Madera, 
California. 



92 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE 
COUNCIL OF THE AMERICAN 
LIBRARY ASSOCIATION ON DE- 
CEMBER 30, 1921: 

The American Library Association be- 
lieves that $1 per capita of the population 
of the community served is a reasonable 
minimum annual revenue for the library 
in a community desiring to maintain a 
good modern public library system with 
trained librarians. 

This sum should cover a main library 
with reading room facilities, branch li- 
braries and reading rooms within easy 
reach of all the people, a registration of 
card holders equal to at least thirty per 
cent of the population, and a considerable 
collection of the more expensive books of 
reference, with a home use of about five 
volumes per capita per year. 

This allowance of per capita revenue 
may need modification in the case of very 
small or very large communities, or com- 
munities which are otherwise exceptional. 
Small communities may often obtain in- 
creased library service for the same ex- 



penditure per capita by enlarging the 
area of administration. The situation in 
large communities is often modified by the 
presence of good endowed libraries free 
for public use. 

Communities desiring their libraries to 
supply these needs extensively and with 
the highest grade of trained service, will 
find it necessary to provide a support 
much larger than the minimum of $1 per 
capita. This should cover extension work 
sufficient to bring home to the children, 
the foreign-speaking people, business men. 
artisans, advanced students, public offi- 
cials, and in general all classes of the 
people, the opportunities that such a 
library is not only ready but able to afford, 
with a service that is administered by 
trained librarians having special knowl- 
edge in their particular departments. 



It is expected that the American Ld 
brary Association at some later meeting 
will adopt similar resolutions on library 
revenues for high school, normal school, 
university and college libraries. 



SCHOOL LIBRARY STATISTICS. 
(From reports of County Superintendents of Schools, 1920-21.) 

Total school districts 3,750 

Elementary 3,407 

High 343 

Total expended for books for elementary schools $314,965 

Total expended for books for high schools $895,331 

Total volumes in elementary schools 2,813,172 

Total volumes in high schools 752,313 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



93 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Althea H. Warren, Public 
Library, San Diego. 

Vice-President, Sydney B. Mitchell, 
University of California Library, Berke- 
ley. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Eleanor Hitt, San 
Diego County Free Library, San Diego. 

Trustees Section. 

President, F. H. Pettingell, Trustee 
Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Mrs Katherine G. Smith, 
Trustee Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Municipal Libraries Section. 
President, Susan T. Smith, City Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee — The President, 
Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer and 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Milton J. Fer- 
guson, Celia Gleason, Everett R. Perry, 
Cornelia D. Provines, Joseph H. Quire. 

Auditing — F. H. Pettingell, chairman ; 
Gabrielle Morton. 

'Nominating — The Constitution provides 
for a "Nominating Committee consisting 
of representatives selected by the respec- 
tive districts at their district meetings." 

Publications — Alice J. Haines, State 
Library, chairman ; Blanche Chalfant, 
Beulah Mumm. 

Resolutions — Helen E. Haines, 1175 
N. Mentor ave., Pasadena, chairman ; 
Charles S. Greene, Sarah M. Jacobus. 

Certification — Jeannette M. Drake, 
Public Library, Pasadena, chairman ; 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Joseph H. 
Quire, Susan T. Smith, Helen E. 
Vogleson. 

Cooperation — Susan T. Smith, City 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Zaidee 
Brown, Essae M. Culver, Margaret 



Hatch, Celia A. Hayward, Ida M. Mun- 
son, Faith E. Smith. 

J. L, Gillis Memorial — Milton J. Fer- 
guson, chairman ; Mary Barmby, Eleanor 
Hitt. 



3 — Joseph H. Quire, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Mrs 
Algeline M. Lawson, Julia Steffa. 

Membership — Carleton B. Joeckel, Pub- 
lic Library, Berkeley, chairman ; Jasmine 
Britton, Elta L. Camper, Mabel R. Gillis, 
Marjorie H. Kobler, Sarah E. McCardle. 

Music — Jessie M. Fredricks, Public 
Library, San Francisco, chairman ; Elea- 
nor Caruthers, Essae M. Culver. 

Salaries — Milton J. Ferguson, chair- 
man ; Carleton B. Joeckel, Sydney B. 
Mitchell. 

A. L. A. Representative — Everett R. 
Perry. 

DISTRICT OFFICERS AND 
DISTRICTS. 

First District. 

President, Mrs Elizabeth G. Potter, 
Margaret Carnegie Library, Mills College, 

Secretary, Gladys English, Public Li* 
brary, Berkeley. 

The first district consists of the fol- 
lowing cities : San Francisco, Alameda, 
Berkeley, Oakland ; and the following 
libraries : Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity Library and Margaret Carnegie 
Library, Mills College. 

Second District. 

President, Anne Hadden, Monterey 
County Free Library, Salinas. 

Secretary, Edna Holroyd, San Mateo 
County Free Library, Redwood City. 

The second district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Alameda (excepting Ala- 
meda, Berkeley, and Oakland), Contra 
Costa, Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo, 
Santa Clara (excepting Stanford Univer- 
sity), Santa Cruz. 



94 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



Third District. 

President, Christal Fox, Public .Li- 
brary, Healdsburg. 

Secretary, Rutb Hall, Public Library, 
Santa Rosa. 

The third district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lake, Marin, Mendo- 
cino, Napa, Solano, Sonoma. 

Fourth District. 

President, Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno 
County Free Library, Fresno. 

Secretary, Mrs Florence E. Robinson, 
Fresno County Free Library, Fresno. 

The fourth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Fresno, Inyo, Kern, 
Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stan- 
islaus, Tulare, Tuolumne. 

Fifth District. 

President, H. O. Parkinson, Public 
Library, Stockton. 

Secretary, Angeline Orr, Public Li- 
brary, Stockton. 

The fifth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties : Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, 
El Dorado, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Sacra- 
mento, San Joaquin, Yolo. 

Sixth District. 

President, Marion L. Horton, Public 
Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Mrs Frances B. Linn, Pub- 
lic Library, Santa Barbara. 



The sixth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Imperial, Los Angeles, 
Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San 
Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh District. 

President, Ida M. Reagan, Humboldt 
County Free Library, Eureka. 

Secretary, Winifred Menzies, Hum- 
boldt County Free Library, Eureka. 

The seventh district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Del Norte, Humboldt. 

Eighth District. 

President, Elisabeth C. Haines,. Lassen 
County Free Library, Susanville. 

Secretary, Anna L. Williams, Public 
Library, Alturas. 

The eighth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth District. 

President, Edna Hewitt, Sutter County 
Free Library, Yuba City. 

Secretary, Patricia Lang, Sutter 
County Free Library, Yuba City.- 

The ninth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties: Butte, Colusa, Glenn, 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trin 
ity, Yuba. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



95 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library, Secretary. 

Everett R. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free li- 
brary law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 1911) 
read as follows : 

Sec. 6. A commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library. 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visprs shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing, by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of county 
librarian unless, prior to his appointment, 
he has received from the board of library 
examiners a certificate of qualification for 
the office. At the time of his appoint- 
ment, the county librarian need not be a 
resident of the county nor a citizen of the 
State of California. 

REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

The Board of Library Examiners held 
an examination in Sacramento, January 
11, 1922. Four candidates were exam- 
ined and certificates issued, as follows : 
To Miss Marjorie J. Chilberg, Miss Ellen 
B. Frink (examination taken for new 
certificate), Miss Ella Packer, Miss Eliza- 
beth Stevens. 

At the end of 1921 the new certificate 
was issued to those first-grade certificate 
holders who were actively engaged as 
county librarians, their certificates being- 
renewed without examination. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Note. — First-grade certificates are valid 
for use throughout the state ; second grade, 
in counties of the twenty-first to the fifty- 
eighth (except twenty-fifth, thirty-third, 
thirty-fifth and forty-second) classes, in- 
clusive. Third-grade certificates, formerly 
issued for use in counties of the forty- 
ninth to the fifty-eighth classes, inclusive, 
are no longer issued. 

The new certificate, issued for the first 
time, December 22, 192 0, is valid for use 
throughout the state. 



First Grade. 

Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Bailey, Anne Bell, Asst. Fresno County 

Free Library, Fresno. 
Bigley, Winifred H., Ln. Merced County 

Free Library, Merced. 
Coulter, Mabel, Asst. Contra Costa County 

Free Library, Martinez. 
Culver, Essae M., Ln. Butte County Free 

Library, Oroville. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Napa County Free 

Library, Napa. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. 
Flower, Gretchen L., Ln. Tulare County 

Free Library, Visalia. 
Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 

Library, Salinas. 
Haines, Alice J., Head Documents Dept, 

State Library, Sacramento. 
Hatch, Margaret, Ln. Standard Oil Co. Li- 
brary, San Francisco. 
Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. San Mateo Coun- 
ty Free Library, Redwood City. 
Morse, Marion, Ln. Maui County Free 

Library, Wailuku, T. H. 
Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 

Angeles. 
Provines, Cornelia D., Ln. Sacramento 

County Free Library, Sacramento. 
Reagan, Ida. M., Ln. Humboldt County 

Free Library, Eureka. 
Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. Stanislaus 

County Free Library, Modesto. 
Smith, Susan T., Ln. City Library, Sac- 
ramento. 
Steffa, Julia, Temporary Ln. Madera 

County Free Library, Madera. 
Suggett, Mrs Laura (Steffens), Mrs Allen 

H. Suggett, Ln. Sutro Branch, State 

Library, San Francisco. 
Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 

Public Library and Santa Cruz County 

Free Library, Santa Cruz. 
Waters, Caroline S.. Ln. San Bernardino 

County Free Library, San Bernardino. 
Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 

County Free Library, Martinez. 



New Certificate. 

Barmby, Mary, Ln. Alameda County Free 
Library, Oakland. 

Beeman, Mrs Anne (Madison), Mrs 
Thomas Beeman, Ln. Imperial County 
Free Library, El Centre 

Brackett, Thelma, Ln. Siskiyou County 
Free Library, Yreka. 

Brewitt, Mrs Theodora R., Asst. Ln. Pub- 
lic Library, Long Beach. 

Burket, Frances M., Ln. Amador County 
Free Library, Jackson. 

Chalfant, Blanche, Asst. Yolo County Free 
Library, Woodland. 

Chatfield, Marguerite, Asst. City Library, 
Sacramento. 

Chilberg, Marjorie J., Asst. Solano County 
Free Library, Fairfield. 

Dobell, Lila Grace, Ln. Trinity County 
Free Library, Weaverville. 

Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 
Sacramento. 

Ferris, Katharine Post, Asst. Public Li- 
brary, Los Angeles. 



96 



news notes of calipornia LIBRARIES. [January, 1922 



Frink, Ellen B., Asst. Monterey County 
Free Library, Salinas. 

Gibson, Hazel G.. Asst. Sacramento County 
Free Library, Sacramento. 

Gleason, Celia, Ln. Los Angeles County 
Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Greene, Charles S., Ln. Free Library, Oak- 
land. 

Gregory, Marion L., Asst. Kings County 
Free Library, Hanford. 

Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. San Diego County Free 
Library, San Diego. 

Huntington, Stella, Ln. Santa Clara County 
Free Library, San Jose. 

Kobler, Marjorie H., Asst. San Diego 
County Free Library, San Diego. 

Kyle, Eleanore, Ln. Kings County Free 
Library, Hanford. 

Laugenour, Nancy C, Ln. Yolo County 
Free Library, Woodland. 

Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 
bara Free Public Library and Santa 
Barbara County Free Library, Santa 
Barbara. 

Livingston, Margaret E., Ln. Orange 
County Free Library, Santa Ana. 

McCardle, Sarah E., Ln. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. 

Middleton, Maude, Ln. Glenn County Free 
Library, Willows. 

Mumm, Beulah, Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Packer, Ella, Asst. Colusa County Free 
Library, Colusa. 

Rea, Robert, Ln. Public Library, San 
Francisco. 

Stevens, Elizabeth, Ln. Tehama County 
Free Library, Red Bluff. 

Thomas, Mabel W., Asst. Ln. Free Li- 
brary, Oakland. 

Topping, Elizabeth R., Ln. "Ventura 
County Free Library, Ventura. 

Vogleson, Helen E., Asst. Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Warren, Althea H., Ln. Public Library, 
San Diego. 

Second Grade, 

Bacon, Mrs Virginia C, Ln. Park College, 

Parkville, Mo. 
Brenton, Mrs Dorothy H., Temp. Asst. 

Public Library, Los Angeles. 
Dold, Margaret E., Asst. State Teachers 

College Library, San Francisco. 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita, Ln. Plumas 

County Free Library, Quincy. 
Encking, Louise F., Asst. Public Library,- 

Seattle, Wash. 
Ewing, Marion J., Asst. Pomona College 

Library, Claremont. 
Faulkner, Mrs Mabel F., Asst. Riverside 

Public Library, Riverside. 
Gantz, Flo A., Ln. San Luis Obispo 

County Free Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Glock, Mary E., Ln. Madera County 

Free Library, Madera (on leave of 

absence). 
Hewitt, Edna J., Ln. Sutter County Free 

Library, Tuba 'City. 
McCright, Edith C, Asst. Public Library, 

El Paso, Texas. 
McNeill, Norah. Ln. Public Library, Rich- 
mond. 
Margrave, Anne, Ln. Inyo County Free 

Library, Independence. 
Martin, Lenala A., Ln. Lassen County Free 

Library, Susanville. 
Northey, Delia F., State School Library 

Supervisor, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Regnart, Mrs Ora M., Ln. San Benito 

County Free Library, Hollister. 
Rowland, Helen M., Ln. Tuolumne 

County Free Library, Sonora. 



Schaer, Mildred E., Asst. Public Library, 
Los Angeles. 

Thompson, Laura E., Asst. Public Library, 
Los Angeles. 

Wheaton, Florence J., Asst. Kern County 
Free Library, Bakersfleld. 

Whitbeck, Josephine L., Asst. City Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Worden, Mrs Dorothy (Clarke), Mrs 
Charles J. Worden, Ln. Colusa County 
Free Library, Colusa. 

m 

Third Grade. 

Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 
Free Library, Alturas. 

At Present Out of Library Work. 

Alexander, Mrs Lela (Clapper ton) (New 

certificate) . 
De Witt, Mrs Isabelle (Park), Mrs Ralph 

E. De Witt (2d grade). 
Downey, Mrs Persis (Mclntire), Mrs 

Stephen W. Downey (2d grade). 
Lewis, Mrs Anna Jean (Thomson), Mrs 

R. B. Lewis (New certificate). 
McMayburns, Mrs Hazel (Askey), Mrs 

Walter C. McMayburns (2d grade). 
Percival, Mrs Marion (Schumacher), Mrs 

H. Frederic Percival (2d grade). 
Price, Mrs Eunice (Steele), Mrs Jay H. 

Price (2d grade). 
Smith. Mrs Mary Pierce (2d grade). 
Twaddle, Mrs Bessie (Herrman) (1st 

grade). 
Work, Mrs Geraldine (Graham), Mrs 

George A. Work (2d grade). 
Yates, Mrs Bess (Ranton), Mrs John D. 
Yates (2d grade). 

COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library law 
and circular of information for applicants 
for certificates of qualification to hold 
office of county librarian in California" 
was published in News Note^ of California 
Libraries, April, 1911, and later re- 
printed in pamphlet form. The edition 
being exhausted, a revised edition of the 
circular was printed in Neics Notes of 
California Libraries, January, 1914. This 
has been reprinted as a pamphlet. The 
fifth edition was issued December, 1921. 
(Circular of information only.) The 
fourth edition of the County free libi*ary 
law was also issued in December, 1921. 
Copies of both of above pamphlets will be 
furnished on request. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

The dates for the next examination 
have not yet been set. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chair- 
man of the Board. For application blanks 
or further information address the Chair- 
man of the Board, Milton J. Ferguson, 
State Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



97 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California 
State Library was signed by Governor 
Peter H. Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Septem- 
ber 4, 1913. 

California State Library School was 
discontinued by motion adopted May 22, 
1920. 

Annual income for 1921-22, $152,950. 

Total accessions 233,949 (less 2803 lost 
and discarded =231,146) exclusive of 
13,703 accessions in Books for the Blind 
Department, and of the Sutro Branch in 
San Francisco (estimated at about 119,- 
388 vols.). 

STAFF. 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 

Miss Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Libra- 
rian and Head of Books for the Blind 
Department. 

Mrs Laura Steffens Suggett, Librarian, 
Sutro Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Eudora Garoutte, Head of Cali- 
fornia Department. 

Miss Alice J. Haines, Head of Docu- 
ments Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, County 
Library Organizer. 

Miss Annie Lowry, in charge of Period- 
icals and Binding. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Head of Shipping, Re- 
pairs, etc., Department. 

Miss Beulah Mumm, Reference Libra- 
rian. 

Miss Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Joseph H. Quire, Law and Legislative 
Reference Librarian. 

Miss Myrtle Ruhl, in charge of Order 
Department. 

Miss Marion Anderson, Assistant. 

Miss Beryl Andrews, Assistant. 

Miss Joyce Backus, Assistant. 

Miss Helen M. Bruner, Assistant. 

Miss Rosa F. Butler, Assistant. 

Miss Alice Chenu, Assistant. 

Miss Ella A. Clark, Indexer. 

Miss Bennetta Colton, Stenographer. 

Miss Anna Creaner, Assistant. 

Mrs Gerna R. Dickson, Assistant. 

Miss Lucile E. Ernst, Assistant. 

Miss Kate M. Foley, Home Teacher of 
the Blind, Sutro Branch, California State 
Library. San Francisco. 

Miss Zilla Grant, Assistant. 

Miss Frances Daub, Assistant. 

Miss Bessie B. Heath, Assistant. 

Miss Margaret Kilgariff, Assistant. 

Miss Anita Knopf, Stenographer, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

7—16230 



Miss Florence Lamb, Bookkeeper. 

Miss Marie Lamont, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Rachel G. Look, Assistant. 

Miss Anna McAnear, Stenographer. 

Miss N. Ruth McCullough, Assistant. 

Miss Beth Mclntire, Assistant. 

Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin, Assistant, 
Sutro Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Laura M. Manhart, Assistant. 

Miss D. Florence Montfort, Assistant. 

Miss Catharine J. Morrison, Home 
Teacher of the Blind, 951 El Molino St., 
Los Angeles. 

H. C. Peterson, Collector of Californi- 
ana. 

Miss Mary V. Provinces, Assistant. 

Miss Irene E. Ryan, Assistant. 

Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Assistant. 

Miss Grace Taylor, Assistant. 

Miss Lily Tilden, Assistant. 

Mrs Olive M. Treichler, Assistant. 

Miss Marguerite Walker, Stenographer. 

Miss Caroline Wenzel, Assistant. 

Miss Mae Davies, Book Repairer. 

Miss Emma F. de Merritt, Book Re- 
pairer. 

Mrs Thelma Foss, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Mae Moore, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Wilma Scott, Book Repairer. 

Wm. G. Lyons, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Wyman L. Pease, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Charles Tevis Edwards, Messenger. 

Lincoln Fitzell, Messenger (Part-time). 

Elenora Kaeuper, Messenger". 

Alice Miller, Messenger (Part-time). 

Louise Reynolds, Messenger. 

J. L. Foss, Janitor. 

G. A. Klees, Janitor. 

Albert Oughten, Truck Driver. 

R. N. Polmere, Janitor. 

Harry A. Simons, Elevator Operator. 



STAFF NEWS ITEMS. 

During the quarter several additions 
to the staff were made. Miss Joyce 
Backus, a graduate of Simmons College, 
who has worked in the New York City 
Public Library and in the Washington 
State Normal School Library, began in 
the Reference Department October 1. 
Miss Zilla Grant, formerly of the Minne- 
sota State Law Library, was added to the 
Law Department staff December 8. Mrs 
Wilma Scott, Book Repairer, began Oc- 
tober 24; Charles Tevis Edwards, mes- 
senger, October 1 ; Alice Miller, messenger, 



98 



News notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



November 7 ; and Grace Taylor took over 
Ida Smith's work October 27. 

Mrs Evelyn Prentiss McKevitt left us 
October 31 in order to devote lier entire 
time to her work on the Sacramento 
Union. Ida Smith resigned November 5 
and was married November 19 to Mr 
L. L. Daly. They are now living in 
Carbon, Shasta County. 

Miss Rosa Butler was transferred from 
Periodicals to the Law Department, to 
take Mrs McKevitt's place. Miss Beth 
Mclntire is now an assistant in the Docu- 
ments Department. 

Miss Mary K. Ray of our Law Depart- 
ment passed away December 13 in San 
Diego. Miss Ray had come to us from 
the Nebraska State Library and, in the 
few months she was on our staff, had 
gained the liking and respect of all with 
whom she came in contact. The last 
few months Miss Ray had been on leave 
of absence, due to illness. 

The practice of having monthly staff 
meetings has once more been instituted. 
The first Monday in the month is "Staff 
Meeting Day." However, in December 
there was a Christmas party instead. It 
was held December 21, on the top floor, 
from four to five o'clock. A Christmas 
tree, Santa Claus and a gift for each per- 
son gave the true holiday appearance. 
Aside from the staff there were a few 
guests present : Miss Susan Smith of the 
City Library, Miss Cornelia Provines of 
the County Library, Miss Thelma 
Brackett of the Siskiyou County Library 
and Mrs Ferguson and Ruth Ferguson. 

Mr Ferguson visited libraries in Los 
Angeles and Orange counties several days 
in early October. 

LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days 9 a.m. to 5 p.m 

Legislative session : 

Week days 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

LAW AND LEGISLATIVE REFER- 
ENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Joseph H. Quire, in charge. 

The Law and Legislative Reference 
Department is fully equipped with the 
latest reports, digests, encyclopedias and 
textbooks, the statutes of other states, the 
United States, Great Britain, Canada, 
Australia and certain other foreign coun- 



tries, and briefs of counsel in cases de- 
cided in the California Supreme and 
Appellate courts. State officers are en- 
titled to borrow books, and private indi- 
viduals are accorded the same privilege 
upon presentation of a request signed by 
a Supreme, Appellate or Superior Judge, 
or other state officer. Books may be kept 
three weeks, and will be once renewed 
for two weeks. All books are subject to 
recall, if required by a state officer. 

In addition to special service to mem- 
bers of the Legislature, information on 
the laws of California and other states 
and countries is given on inquiry from 
libraries or individuals. 

Recent accessions to the department 
will be found listed under the heading 
"Law" in the section on "Recent Acces- 
sions." 



DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Recent accessions of California State 
and City publications will be found on 
pages 137, 141. 

Copies of 33 California state publica- 
tions have been received for distribution ' 
to libraries during October, November and 
December, 1921. 

Adjutant General. Honor roll. 1921. 
Agriculture Bd. Statistical report, 1920. 
Agriculture Dept. Monthly bull. vol. 10, 

nos. 7-9. 

Special publication no. 4. 

Status of California grape industry, 

report no. 2. 
Banks Supt. Introductory letter. 1921. 
Building & Loan Commr. Annual report, 

1921. 
Fish & Game Comm. California Fish & 

Game, vol. 7, no. 4. 
Historical Survey Comm. Architectural 

History of Mission San Carlos Borro- 

meo. 1921. 
Immigration & Housing- Comm. Advisory 

pamphlet on camp sanitation & housing. 

1921. 
Industrial Accident Comm. Report, 1921. 
■California safety news, vol. 5, nos. 



9-12. 

Boiler safety bulletin. 1921. 

General construction safety orders 

relating to explosives. 1921. 

General safety orders. 1921. 

Quarry safety orders. 1921. 

Medical Examiners Bd. Suppl. to 1921 

directory. 
Mining Bur. 17th Report, 1920. 
Bulletin no. 90. 



California oil fields, vol. 7, nos. 1-4. 

Public Instruction Supt. School law, 1921. 
Railroad Comm. Public utilities act, 1921. 
Uniform classification of accounts 



for Class A, automotive transportation 

companies. 
Secretary of State. Roster, Dec. 1921. 
Treasurer. Biennial report, 1918-20. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



99 



REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Beulah Mumm, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on request of the 
librarian, and to any other educational 
institution on request of its official head 
or its librarian ; to individuals through the 
signature of a state officer, of the Li- 
brarian of the local library or of the 
official head of any other educational in- 
stitution or on receipt of a $5.00 deposit; 
to a club or grange on request of its presi- 
dent, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 

In connection with the regular inven- 
tory, we are trying to clear up all arrears 
in our charging file. If the county li- 
brarians will look over their records and 
their shelves, and return books no longer 
in active use, or renew those still wanted, 
it will be a great help. It would help, 
too, in keeping our records straight, if 
books or renewal slips might be mailed 
so as to reach the State Library on the 
date the books are due. 



ORDER AND ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

Myrtle Rtjhl, in charge. 

During October, November and Decem- 
ber 1872 books, 37 prints and 3 maps were 
accessioned. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Munson, in charge. 

During October, November and Decem- 
ber 1330 books were cataloged and S11J 
cards were added to the file. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

Eudora Garoutte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of books 
on the history and description, resources 
and industries of the State, as well as the 
works of California authors in all de- 
partments of literature. These are made 
accessible by means of a card catalog. 
Full names and biographical sketches of 
California authors, artists, musicians, 
pioneers and early settlers are being 
secured, together with their photographs. 
The collection of bound periodicals is 
quite large. 'The Department also con- 



tains about 7000 bound volumes of news- 
papers, a file of which is being indexed 
with reference to the history of the State. 
Students will be assisted in their work. 

Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

Amos Pratt Josselyn arrived in Sacra- 
mento Valley in lSlO, coming overland 
from Ohio. He returned to his native 
state, where he died in 1SS5. His de- 
scendants are still living in California. 
Mr Josselyn kept a most interesting 
journal of his trip across the plains. 
This journal together with a number of 
letters written during the period, 1S4S- 
1S59, have been given to the California 
department by John H. Josselyn, a son, 
and Mrs Sarah K. Kearns, a daughter, 
and are now a part of the California col- 
lection. 

Another card of unusual interest is that 
of Samuel Williams. Mr Williams was 
a native of Massachusetts, his father was 
a Major in the war of 1812 and was in 
command of Fort Warren, Boston Har- 
bor, at that time. Mr Williams was a 
member of the Vigilance Committee, also 
of Tiger Engine Co. No. 14. Exempt 
Fireman. Valuable relics of these organ- 
izations are to be presented to the- depart- 
ment by Solon H. Williams, a son of the 
subject of this sketch. Mr Williams died 
in 1868. 

Other cards received are those of Jane 
and Malcolm Bankhead, also Harry R., 
Henry S., John S., and Valentine J. Bor- 
rette. The Bankhead and Borrette fami- 
lies were pioneers of Lassen county. The 
descendants are still living in that county. 

California Authors. 

The following author cards have been 
received since the last issue of Neics Notes 
of California Libraries: 

Campbell, Kenneth Hosmer 

Davis, William Brownlee 

Duffns. Robert Luther 
*Fee, Harry T. 

Hervey, Harry Clay 

Holmes, Fenwick L. 
*Kenyon, Mrs. Camilla (Lies) 

Mrs. Walter J. Kenyon 
*Mandel, Frank 

Parkinson, Mrs. Jessie (Heaton) 
Mrs O. B. Parkinson 

Root. Henry 

Woocls, Glenn H. 



*Native Calif or nians. 



100 



news notes op calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



California Musicians. 

The following musician cards have been 
received since the last issue of News Notes 
of California Libraries: 

Allen, Walter Alfred 

Barrett, Mrs Olga (Block) 
Mrs Charles L. Barrett 
* Brooks, Mrs Suzanne (Pasmore) 

Mrs Digby Sherman Brooks 
*Chamlee, Archer Mario 

Harmon, Raymond 

Lee, Eleanor 

Middaugh, Florence 

Patrick, Harry Wallace 

Weimar, Jessie 

Winters, O. Heywood 

California Artists. 

The following artist cards have been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Libraries: 
Barton, Loren Roberta 
Bush, Ella Shepard 
Coolidge, John 
De Kurif, Henri Gilbert 
Ferguson, Mrs Lillian (Prest) 

Mrs Peter Ferguson 
Gilbert. Arthur Hill 
Kendall, Mrs Marie (Boening) 

Mrs Dudley Bert Kendall 
May, Beulah 

Mitchell, Laura Marie des Barres 
Modra, Theodore B. 
Nakanisi, Kiniehi 
Rich, John Hubbard 
Schuster, Donna Norine 
Siboni, Emma 
Steere, Mrs Lora (Woodhead) 

Mrs Thomas I. Steere 
White, Orrin Augustine 
Tens, Karl Julius Heinrich 

Newspaper Index. 

The index covers the period from 
August 15, 1846, to date. 

Catalog. 

Three hundred and ninety-four cards 
have been added to the California catalog 
during the last quarter. 

Donations. 

The most valuable donation received is 
a number of original documents and let- 
ters pertaining to the Folsom estate, gift 
of Henry R. Wagner of Berkeley. These 
documents are especially valuable as they 
are to be incorporated in the collection of 
Folsom material now in the department. 

The diary of Robert Chalmers, the 
journal and letters of A. P. Josselyn, and 
the reminiscences of Mrs P. V. Van Ars- 
dale sent in by Julia Fuller are of intense 
interest. 



*Native Californians. 



Solon H. Williams has presented a scrap 
book and two theatre programs printed on 
satin. Mr Williams has other historical 
material which he will place in the de- 
partment at an early date. Siskiyou 
County Free Library has donated a scrap 
book that was compiled by Hon John 
Daggett. The book is full of early day 
reminiscences. 

Miss Anita Knopf of Sutro Branch has 
secured for us, through the generosity of 
Mrs Herbert Knopf, 24. pictures of the 
families of General M. G. Vallejo, Salva- 
dor Vallejo, and Capt George Gedge. 
This collection of pictures is unique and 
a very valuable addition to our pioneer 
picture collection. A large picture of 
General Vallejo is the outstanding fea- 
ture of the collection. 

Our musicians, authors, and artists have 
added many valuable items as usual. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND DEPART- 
MENT. 

Mabel R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in the various types 
are sent to any blind resident in Cali- 
fornia upon application. Circular and 
finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. Writing appliances and 
games for the blind are loaned as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 
that the different kinds can be tried 
before they are ordered. Addresses of 
firms supplying all articles loaned will be 
furnished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an in- 
stitution distributing embossed literature 
are carried free through the mails. 

Embossed catalogs in American Braille, 
Moon, and New York point are now 
available. They will be loaned to bor- 
rowers wishing them for use in book 
selection. 

The State Library will be glad to have 
borrowers who care to do so write any 
letters or requests for books to the Li- 
brary in Braille or New York point. 

The first book was loaned June 13, 
1905. There are now 1664 blind bor- 
rowers, 53 borrowers having been added 
during October, November and December, 
and 35 borrowers lost by death during 
1021. Total .accessions are 13,703 as fol- 
lows.: New York point books 2290; New 
York point music 184 ; American Braille 
books 2952 ; American Braille music 
1169; European Braille books 1972; 
European Braille music 146 ■ Moon books 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



101 



3267 ; Moon music 3 ; Revised Braille 
Grade 14 books 941 ; Revised Braille 
Grade 1-J music 94 ; Standard dot books 
16 ; Line books 192 ; Line music 21 ; Ink 
print books 297 ; * Appliances 81 ; *Games 
45; Maps 33. During- 1921, 36 books 
were lost or discarded and 3 books were 
recovered from lost. The above totals 
have been adjusted accordingly. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by F. B. 
Beans, Mrs A. H. Clise, Mrs Anna Cour- 
tois, Miss Kate M. Foley, George P. 
Guyot, Henry Hobson, Ruby Holtz, Mrs 
A. W. Joy, Miss Bessie Long, Wjm. A. 
Miller, John O'Donnell, Miss Rose Reilly, 
Mrs L. Sargent, George W. Shoemaker, 
William Thomas, Canadian National In- 
stitute for the Blind, Christian Record 
Publishing Co., Free Gospel Library for 
the Blind, Joseph Gockel, New York Asso- 
ciation for the Blind, Pennsylvania Insti- 
tution for the Blind, Society for the Aid 
of the Sightless, Xavier Free Publication 
Society for the Blind, Ziegler Publishing- 
Co. 

- Other gifts will be indicated in the next 
list of books, etc., which have been added 
to the library. See page 141. 

During- October, November and Decem- 
ber 7970 books, etc., were loaned as fol- 
lows : New York point 838 ; American 
Braille 1089; European Braille 14u4 ; 
Moon 3271; Revised Braille Grade 14 
1296 ; Standard dot ; Line 3 ; Ink print 
books 2 ; Appliances 11 ; Maps 3 ; Games 
3. The loans were divided by class as 
follows : Philosophy and religion 601 
sociology 83 ; language 84 ; primers 110 
science 9S ; useful arts 72 ; fine arts 1 
amusements 4 ; music 178 ; literature 306 ; 
fiction 4565 ; travel and history 733 ; bi- 
ography 269; periodicals S66. 



Home Teaching. 

Miss Foley, home teacher of the blind, 
is at the Sutro Branch of the State 
Library, Sacramento and Webster 
streets, San Francisco, every Thursday 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. She gives lessons 
regularly in Alameda, Berkeley, Oakland, 

*Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



Palo Alto, San Bruno, San Jose, Santa 
Clara and other places in that vicinity. 
Miss Morrison, home teacher of the blind, 
is at the Los Angeles County Free Li- 
brary, Broadway Annex, Hall of Records, 
on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons 
from 1.30 until 5.30 o'clock. She gives 
lessons regularly in Los Angeles and 
nearby places. 

From October 1 to December 31 they 
gave 347 lessons in the homes of the blind 
and 167 lessons at the libraries and insti- 
tutions on the 63 afternoons they spent in 
them. Miss Foley and Miss Morrison 
have made 135 visits and calls in connec- 
tion with the work for purposes other 
than giving lessons, and received 33 visits 
in connection with the work. 

During the quarter Miss Foley and 
Miss Morrison spent 187 hours on cor- 
respondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote 333 letters and 154 postals and 
received 221 letters and 25 postals. They 
also answered and made 446 telephone 
calls. They made 1 address. Miss Foley 
teaches regularly in Oakland a class of 
seeing people to write Braille. The 
various other activities in connection with 
the work of the home teachers can not 
be easily -tabulated. 

In December Miss Foley spoke before 
the pupils of Miss Williams School of Cre- 
ative Education at Berkeley. 

Persons who know of possible pupils 
anywhere in Orange, Los Angeles or San 
Diego counties are urged to communicate 
with Miss Catharine J. Morrison, 951 
El Mo-lino st., Los Angeles (telephone 
Wilshire 5339) ; and anywhere around 
the bay, with Miss Kate M. Foley, Sutro 
Branch, State Library, Sacramento and 
Webster streets, San Francisco (telephone 
West 3046). About prospective pupils 
in other localities, write direct to the 
State Library, Sacramento. 

SUTRO BRANCH. 

Mks Laura Steffens S u g g e t t , in 

charge. 

The Sutro Branch occupies the top 
floor of the Lane Medical Library Build- 
ing, Sacramento and Webster streets, San 
Francisco, and is open every day except 
Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

See page 73. 



102 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 
SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Miss Esther M. Bomgardner, San Diego, 
Cal. 

'15. Asst. Public School L., Los Angeles, 
Miss Thelma Brackett, San Diego, Cal. 

'20. Ln. Siskiyou Co. F. L., Yreka. 
Miss Helen V. Briggs, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Agnes B. Brown, Palo Alto, Cal. 
'15. Asst. Washington State College 
Library, Pullman, Wash. 
Miss Helen M. Bruner, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Virginia Clowe Bullis, Woodland, Cal. 

'17. Out of library work. 
Miss Ruth E. Bullock, Redlands, Cal. 

'15. Asst. P. L. Redlands. 
Miss Katharine Cahoon, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Hilo Co. F. L., Hilo, T. H. 
Miss Elta L. Camper, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Univ. of Cal. L., Berkeley. 
Miss Blanche Chalfant, Bishop, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Yolo Co. F. L., Woodland. 
Miss Marguerite Chatfield, Pasadena, Cal. 

'20. Asst. P. L., Sacramento. 
Miss Nellie E. Christensen, Selma, Cal. 

'19. Asst. Fresno Co. F. L., Fresno. 
Miss Mabel Coulter, Salinas, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Contra Costa Co. F. L., Mar- 
tinez. 
Miss Helen Esther Crawford, Winters, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Miss Dorotha Davis, Los Angeles, Cal. 

'17. Ln. Fresno High School L., Fresno. 
Miss Tillie de Bernardi, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Estella De Ford, National City, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Napa Co. F. L., Napa. 
Miss Margaret Dennison, Alameda, Cal. 
'17. Temp. Cataloger P. L., Turlock, 
Cal. 
Miss Abbie Doughty, San Luis Obispo, Cal. 
'20. Teacher-Ln. Bonita Union Hi,gh 
School, La Verne. 
Miss Ellen B. Frink, Palo Alto. Cal. 

'19. Asst. Monterey Co. F. L., Salinas. 
Miss Flo A. Gantz, Pomona. Cal. 

'20. Ln. San Luis Obispo Co. F. L., 
San Luis Obispo. 
Miss Beatrice Y. Gawne, Berkeley, Cal. 
'17. Ln. Salinas Union High School L., 
Salinas. . 

Miss Hazel G. Gibson, Santa Monica, Cal. 
'19. Asst. Sacramento Co. F. L., Sac- 
ramento, Cal. 
Miss Margaret V. Girdner, Sacramento. 
'17 Ln. Palo Alto High School L., Palo 
Alto. 
Miss Mary E. Glock, Madera, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Madera Co. F. L., Madera. 
(On leave of absence.) 
Miss Bernice L. Goff, San Jose, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould, Woodland, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Mrs Mildred Kellogg Hargis, Salinas, Cal. 

'18. Out of library work. 
Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss, Hood River, 
Oregon. 
'15. Out of library work. 
Miss Margaret Hatch, Santa Rosa, Cal. 
'15. Ln. Standard Oil Co. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Miss Frances Haub, Sacramento, Cal. 

'20. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Bessie B. Heath, Michigan Bar, Cal. 

'19. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Hazel Meddaugh Heffner, Stockton, 
Cal. 
'IS. Out of library work. 



Miss Cecilia Henderson, Santa Paula, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Edna S. Holroyd, Hanford, Cal. 
'15. Ln. San Mateo Co. F. L., Redwood 
City. 
Miss Lucile Huff, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'20. Asst. P. L., Palo Alto. 
Mrs Helen Hopwood Judd, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Miss Helen Katherine Kellogg, Salinas, 
Cal. 
'19. With Nichols Publishing Co., New 
York City. 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy, Elk 
Grove, Cal. 
'15. Out of library work. 
Mrs Algeline Marlow Lawson, San Diego, 
Cal. 
'18. Asst. P. L., San Diego. 
Miss Marjorie C. Learned, Pasadena, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Miss Amy G. Luke, Willows, Cal. 

'15. Out of library work. 
Miss Everett I. McCullough, Berkeley, Cal. 

'19. Asst. Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 
Miss N. Ruth McCullough, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell. Modesto, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin, Lamanda Park, 
Cal. 
'17. Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San 
Francisco. 
Miss Anne Margrave, Santa Barbara, Cal. 

'14. Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., Independence. 
Miss Lenala Martin, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., Susanville. 
Miss Vera V. Mitchell, Oakland, Cal. 
'19. Ln. Piedmont High School L., 
Piedmont. 
Miss Marion Morse, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Ln. Maui Co. F. L., Wailuku, T. H. 
Mrs Alice Moore Patton, Los Gatos, Cal. 

'18. Out of library work. 
Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival, Han- 
ford, Cal. 
'15. Out of library work. 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, Modesto, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Margaret L. Potter, Oakland, Cal. 
'16. Asst. Stanford Univ. L., Stanford 
Univ. 
Mrs Eunice Steele Price, Berkeley, Cal. 

'16. Out of library work. 
Mrs Beatrice Brasefield Rakestraw, Palo 
Alto, Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Esther L. Ramont, Modesto, Cal. 
'20. Ln. Modesto High School L., 
Modesto. 
Miss Anna Belle Robinson, Claremont, Cal. 

'18. Died, June 22, 1920. 
Miss Myrtle Ruhl, Redwood City, Cal. 
'14. Head of Order Dept, State L., 
Sacramento. 
Miss Marguerite C. Ryan, San Jose, Cal. 
'19. Ln. Campbell Union High School 
L., Campbell. 
Miss Georgia Pearl Seeker, Fresno Cal. 
'19. Asst. Stanford Univ. L., Stanford 
Univ. 
Miss Ruth Seymour, Mill Valley Cal. 
'18 Ln. Tamalpais Union High School 
L., Mill Valley. 
Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Lodi, Cal. 

'17 Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Edith Edenborg Smalley, Muroc, Cal. 

'IS. Out of library work. 
Mrs Edna Bell Smith, Fairoaks, Cal. 
'17. Out of library work. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



103 



Mrs Elizabeth Snyder Smith, Berkeley, 
Cal. 
'20. Out of library work. 
Mrs Vivian Gregory Smith, Woodland, Cal. 
'14. Ln. Security Trust and Savings 
Bank, Los Angeles. 
Mrs Rosamond Bradbury Waithman, Santa 
Barbara, Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Caroline Wenzel, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L.. Sacramento. 
Miss Josephine L. Whitbeck, Richmond, 
Cal. 
'16. Asst. P. L., Sacramento. 
Miss Essie T. White, Broderick, Cal. 

'19. Out of library work. 
Miss Aldine Winham, Salinas, Cal. 

'20. Ln. State Teachers College L., 
Santa Barbara. 
Mrs Dorothy Clarke Worden, Sacramento, 
Cal. 
'15. Ln. Colusa Co. F. L., Colusa. 
Mrs Bess Ranton Yates, Long Beach, Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 



News Items. 

Miss Bernice L. Goff, '14, resigned in 
November from the Federal Reserve Bank 
Library, New York City, to sell securities 
for the L. R. Steel Realty Development 
Corporation. Her address is care of the 
Company, Knickerbocker Building, Times 
Square, New York City. 

Miss Katharine Cahoon, '17, has re- 
signed her position at the Los Angeles 
Public Library. She has gone to Hilo, 
T. H., to be children's librarian in the 
county library there. 

Mr and Mrs J. D. Yates (Bess Ranton 
'18) have a son, John Maynard, born No- 
vember 1G, 1921. The Yates family is 
now making its home in San Jose. 

RECENT ACCESSIONS. 
Additions to the Library During 

October, November and December, 

1921. 

The last number of the Quarterly 
Bulletin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of Vol. 4, 
covering the accessions for September- 
December, 1905. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in News Notes of 
C a lifornia Li braries. 

The last list of recent accessions ap- 
peared in the October, 1921, issue of this 
publication. 

GENERAL WORKS. 
The Bookplate annual for 1921. Edited 
by Alfred Fowler. 1921. 

q097.05 B7 



Booth, Mary Josephine. 

Index to material on picture study. 
1921. (Useful reference series) 

r016.7 B72 
Briscoe, Walter Alwyn. 

Library advertising. 1921. (The Cop- 
tic series) x021.7 B85 

Dana, John Cotton. 
A library primer. [New ed.] cl920. 
x020.2 D16al 

Federation for child study. Children's 
literature com mittee. 
A selected list of books for children. 
Cumulative selection, 1909-1920. 

1920. 028 F29 

Firkins, Ina Ten Eyck. 

Henrik Ibsen ; a bibliography of 
criticism and biography, with an. in- 
dex to characters. 1921. (Practical 
bibliographies). 012 I14f 

Graham, Bessie. 
The bookman's manual. 1921. 028 G73 

Howard, Joseph Jackson. 
The Wardour press series of armorial 
bookplates. Baronets. 1S95. 

q097 H8 
Howe, Harriet Emma. 
The catalog. 1921. x025.3 H85 

Hyde, Dorsey W., jr. 

Workshops for assembling business 
facts. 1921. x026 H99 

Hyde, Grant Milnor. 

Handbook for newspaper workers. 

1921. 070 H99h 

Miller, Zana Kate. 

How to organize a library. 1921. 

x021 M65 
Monroe, Walter Scott. 

A bibliography of standardized tests 
for the high school. 1920. "Re 
printed from the 1920, Journal of 
educational research." 016.1367 M75 

New York nutrition council. Bibliog- 
raphy committee. 
Nutrition bibliography. cl921. 

r016.61239 N56 
The Times, London. 

Tercentenary handlist of English & 
Welsh newspapers, magazines & re- 
views. 1920. r016.07 T58 



104 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



Teall, Gardner Callahan. 

Bookplates, by Sidney L. Smith, with 

a checklist of the bookplates. 1921. 

097 T25 

Wagner, Henry Raup. 

The plains and the Rockies ; a bibliog- 
raphy of original narratives of travel 
and adventure, 1800-1865. 1921. 

qc016.9178 W13 

Zimand, Savel. 

Modern social movements ; descriptive 

summaries and bibliographies. 1921. 

016.3 Z71 

MIND AND BODY. 

Arnold - Forster, Mrs Mary Lucy 
( Story-Maskelyne) . 
Studies in dreams, with a foreword by 
Morton Prince. 1921. 135 A76 

Holmes, Fenwicke Lindsay. 

How to develope faith that heals. 
cl921. 131 H74h 

Sinclair, Upton Beall. 

The book of life ; mind and body. 1921. 

131 S61 

CHILD STUDY. 

Baldwin, Bird Thomas & others. 

Studies in experimental education. 
1920. (The Johns Hopkins univer- 
sity studies in education) q136.7 B1 

Cope, Henry Frederick. 

The parent and the child : case-studies 
in the problems of parenthood. 
cl921. 136.7 C78 

O'Shea, Michael Vincent. 

Mental development and education. 
1921. 136.7 082m 

Terman, Lewis Madison. 

Condensed guide for the Stanford re- 
vision of the Binet-Simon intelligence 
tests. cl920. 136.7 T31c 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

King, Basil. 

The conquest of fear. 1921. 157 K52 



Payot, Jules. 

Will-power and work. 1921. 

159 P34w 

Platt, Charles. 

The psychology of thought and feeling ; 
a conservative interpretation of re- 
sults in modern psychology. 1921. 

150 P71 

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

Bruce, Henry Addington. 

Self-development. 1921. 174 B88 

Ellis, Edith M. O (Lees) "Mrs Have- 
lock Ellis". 
The new horizon in love and life. 1921. 

173 E47 
Eno, Henry Lane. 
Activism. 1920. 



191 E59 



Herbert, Solomon. 

Fundamentals in sexual ethics ; an 

inquiry into modern tendencies. 

1920. 176 H53 

Hobhouse, Leonard Trelawney. 

The rational good. 1921. 171 H68r 

Holmes, Edmond Gore Alexander. 
The cosmic commonwealth. 1920. 

171 H74c 

Irwin, William Henry. 

"The next war" ; an appeal to common 
sense. cl921. 172.4 1 72 

Marden, Orison Swett. 

Choosing a career. cl921. 174 M32c 



Masterful personality. c!921. 

126 M32 
Post, Maveric. 

Heart and soul. 1921. 170 P85 



Paton, Stewart. 

Human behavior. 1921. 



150 P31 



Stace, W. T. 

A critical history of Greek philosophy. 
1920. 180 S77 

Stocks, John Leofric. 

Patriotism and the super-state. 1920. 
(International relations series) 

172 S86 

Trine, Ralph Waldo. 

My philosophy and my religion. 1921. 
(The life books) 131 T83m 

Underhill, Evelyn. 

The essentials of mysticism. 1920. 

149.3 U55e 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



105 



Woolston, Howard Brown. 

Prostitution in the United States. 
1921. (Publications of the Bureau 
of social hygiene) 176 W91 

SPIRITUALISM. 

Lean, Florence (Marryat) Church, 
"Mrs Francis Lean." 
■ There is no death. New & cheaper ed. 
[1920] 133.9 L437 

McCabe, Joseph. 

Is spiritualism based on fraud? [1920] 
133.9 M12i 



' — Spiritualism ; a popular history 

from 1847. [1920] 133.9 M12 

[Simon, Otto Torney] 
The second message of Anne Simon. 
cl920. 133.9 S59 

Stead, W. T., memorial center, Chicago. 
God's world. c!919. 133.9 S79 

OCCULTISM. 

Denis, Leon. 

Life and destiny ; translated by Ella 
Wheeler Wilcox. [1919] 134 D39 

Ellis, Ida. 

A catechism of palmistry. 1920. 

133.6 E47 
Kenilworth, Walter Winston. 

Practical occultism. cl921. 134 K33 

Truman, Olivia M. 

The A. B. C. of occultism. 1920. 

133 T86 
RELIGION. 

Adler, Felix. 

The revival of Anti-Semitism. 1921. 

296 A23r 

The American Jewish year book, 5671, 

Oct. 4, 1910, to Sept. 22, 1911. 1910. 

296 A51 

Committee on the war and the religious 
outlook. 
Christian unity. 1921. 280 C73 

Foster, George Burman. 

Christianity in its modern expression'. 
1921. 239 F75c 

Fowler, Henry Thatcher. 

Great leaders of Hebrew history. 1920. 
(Great leaders series) 220.9 F78 



Harkness, Georgia Elma. 

The church* and the immigrant. cl921. 

261 H28 
Kallen, Horace Meyer. 

Zionism and world politics. 1921. 

296 K14 
Kerby, William Joseph. 

The social mission of charity. 1921. 
(Social action series) 261 K39 

Mann, Jacob. 

The Jews in Egypt and in Palestine 
under the Fatimid caliphs. 1820. 
v. 1, 296 M28 

Mathews, Shailer, ed. 

A dictionary of religion and ethics. 
1921. rq203 M4 

Pratt, Waldo Selden. 

The music of the Pilgrims. el921. 

223.5 P91 
Sctjdder, Yida Dutton. 

Social teachings of the Christian year ; 
lectures delivered at the Cambridge 
conference, 1918. cl921. 240 S43 

Simpson, William John Sparrow. 

The letters of St. Augustine. 1919. 
(Handbooks of Christian literature) 
281.1 S61 
Smith, Oberlin. 

Tho material, why not immortal? 
cl921. 218 S65 

Stoddard, Theodore Lothrop. 
The new world of Islam. 1921. 

297 S86 
Walker, Leslie Joseph. 

The problem .of reunion discussed his- 
torically in seven essays. 1920. 

230 W18 
Westlake, Herbert Francis. 

The parish gilds of mediaeval England. 
1919. 256 W52 

SOCIOLOGY: GENERAL. 

Bowlet, Arthur Lyon. 

Elements of statistics, 4th ed. 1920. 

310 B78a 

Korzybski, Alfred, count. 

Manhood of humanity ; the science and 
art of human engineering. [1921] 
301 K85 
Le Bon, Gustave. 

The world in revolt. 1921. 301 L44w 



106 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



Roe, Frederick William. 

The social philosophy of Carlyle and 
Ruskin. 1921. 301 R69 

Steiner, Jesse Frederick. 

Education for social work. [1921] 

307 S82 

Thompson, J. Walter, company. 

Population and its distribution, comp. 
from the United States Bureau of 
.census figures. 2d ed. rev. & enl. 
cl918. 312 T47 

Weyl, Walter Edward. 

Tired radicals, and other papers. 1921. 

304 W54 
Williams. James Mickel. 

The foundations of social science. 
1920. 301 W72 

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND CITI- 
ZENSHIP. 

Baghdigian, Bagdasar Krekor. 

Americanism in Americanization. 1921. 

323.6 B14 

Bryce, James Bryce, viscount. 
Modern democracies. 1921. 2 v. 

321.8 B91 
Daniels, John. 

America via the neighborhood. 1920. 

323.6 D18 
Duvall, Joseph James. 

Civil government simplified ; a text 
book adapted to classes in American- 
ization. Rev. 1920. c320 D9S 

Eddy, Sherwood. 

Everybody's world. cl920. 327 E21 

Hall, Arnold Bennett. 

Popular government. 1921. (The citi- 
zen's library of economics, politics 
and sociology) 321.8 H17 

Kellor, Frances Alice. 

The federal administration and the 
alien ; a supplment to Immigation 
and the future. cl921. 325.1 K29a 

[McCabe, Joseph] 
The taint in politics ; a study in the 
evolution of parliamentary corrup- 
tion. 1920. 328.42 M12 

McPiieters, George A. & others. 
Citizenship dramatized. cl921. 

323.6 M17 



Mains, George Preston. 

United States citizenship. cl921. 

323.6 M22 
Murray, Gilbert. 

The problem of foreign policy. [1921] 

327 M9S 
Robert, Henry Martyn. 

Parliamentary practice ; an introduc- 
tion to parliamentary law. 1921. 

328.1 R64pa 
Weiss, Feri Felix. 

The sieve ; or, Revelations of the man 
mill. 1921. 325.73 W42 

Wood, James Nelson. 

Democracy and the will to power. 
1921. (The free lance books) 

321.8 W87 
Young, George. 

Diplomacy old and new. 1921. (In- 
ternational relations series) 

327 Y72 

SOCIALISM. 

Claessens, August. 

The logic of socialism, c-1921. 

335 C58 
Darrow, Clarence Seward. 

Argument of Clarence Darrow in the 
case of the Communist labor party. 
cl920. 335.4 D22 

Hillquit. Morris. 

From Marx to Lenin. 1921. 

335 H65f 

Le Rossignol, James Edward. 

What is socialism? cl921. 335 L61w 

Moon, Parker Thomas. 
The labor problem and the social Cath- 
olic movement in France. 1921. 

335.7 M81 
Pasvolsky, Leo. 

The economics of communism. 1921. 

335 P29 
Postgate, Raymond William. 

The workers' International. 1920. 
(International relations series) 

335 P85w 
Salter, Frank Reyner. 

Karl Marx and modern socialism. 
1921. 335 S177 

NEGROES. 

Brawley, Benjamin Griffith. 

A social history of the American negro. 
1921. 325.26 B82s 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



107 



Du Bois, William Edward Burghardt. 

Darkwater ; voices from within the 

veil. 1920. 325.26 D81 

Scott, Emmett Jay. 

Negro migration during the war. 1920. 
q325.26 S3 

JAPANESE. 

American academy of political and social 
science, Philadelphia. 
Present-day immigration. 1921. 

c325.252 A51 
Iwasaki, Uichi. 

The working forces in Japanese politics, 
a brief account of political conflicts, 
1867-1920. 1921. (Columbia uni- 
versity. Studies in history, econom- 
ics and public law. v. 97) 

330.5 C72 
Iyonaga, Toyokichi. 

Japan and the California problem. 
1921. c325.252 197 

Kawakami, Kiyoshi Karl, ed. 
What Japan thinks. 1921. 

327.52 K22w 
Osborne, Sidney. 

The new Japanese peril. 1921. 

327.52 081 

ECONOMICS. 
Babson, Roger Ward. 

Enduring investments. 1921. 331 B11 

Bakeless, John Edwin. 

The economic causes • of modern war. 
1921. 330.9 B16 

Bonbright, James Cummings. 

Railroad capitalization ; a study of tht 
principles of regulation of railroad 
securities. 1920. (Columbia univer- 
sity. Studies in history, economics 
and public law, v. 95) 330.5 C72 

Bowley, Arthur Lyon. 

Prices and wages in the United King- 
dom, 1914-1920. 1921. (Carnegie 
endowment for international peace. 
Division of economics and history) 
q330.94 C2b 

Brissenden, Paul Frederick. 

The I. W. W. ; a study of American 
syndicalism. 1919. (Columbia uni- 
versity. Studies in history, economics 
and public law, v. 83) 330.5 C72 



Bullard, Frederic Lauriston. 

The public refuses to pay. cl921. 

331.88 B935 

Bureau of industrial research. 

Workers' education. cl921. 

331.85 B95 
Burr, Walter. 

Rural organization. 1921. 334.9 B96 

Clarke, John Joseph. 

The housing problem. 1920. 

331.83 C59 

Cole, George Douglas Howard. 
Guild socialism re-stated. [1920] 

338.6 C68 

Cotter, Arundel. 

United States steel ; a corporation with 
a soul. 1921. 338.7 C84u 

An enlarged edition of the author's 
"The authentic history of the United 
States steel corporation, " 9 published 
1916. 

Dalton, Hugh. 

Some aspects of the inequality of in- 
comes in modern communities. 1920. 
(Studies in economics and political 
science) 331 D15 

Darrow, Clarence S. 

"The open shop". 1920. 331.88 D22 

Drachler, Julius. 

Intermarriage in New York city ; a 
statistical study of the amalgamation 
of European peoples. 1921. (Col- 
umbia university. Studies in history, 
economics and public law, v. 94) 

330.5 C72 
Douglas, Paul Howard. 

American apprenticeship and industrial 
education 1921. (Columbia univer- 
sity. Studies in history, economics 
and public law, v. 95) 330.5 C72 

Feis, Herbert. 

The settlement of wage disputes. 1921. 

331.2 F29 

Four years in the underbrush ; adven- 
ture as a working woman in New 
York. 1921. 331.4 F77 

Gilbert, Chester Garfield, c£ Pogue, Jo- 
seph Ezekiel. 
America's power resources ; the eco- 
nomic significance of coal, oil and 
water-power. 1921. 338 G46 



108 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



Goldberg, Jacob A. 

Social aspects of the treatment of the 
insane, based on a study of New 
York experience. 1921. (Columbia 
university. Studies in history, eco- 
nomics and public law, v. 97) 

330.5 C72 
Goodrich, Carter Lyman. 

The frontier of control ; a study in 
British workshop politics. 1920. 

331.8 G65 
Gould, Gerald. 

The coming revolution in Great Brit- 
ain. cl920. 331.8 G69 

Hibbard, Benjamin Horace. 

Marketing agricultural products. 1921. 
338.1 H62m 
Hobson, S. G. 

Guild principles in war and peace. 
1918. 338.6 H68g 

Johnsen, *Julia E. comp. 

Selected articles on unemployment. 
1921. 331 J 65a 

Keith, Arthur Berriedale. 

War government of the British domin- 
ions. 1921. (Carnegie endowment 
for international peace. Division of 
economics and history) q330.94 C2k 

Miner, Clarence Eugene. 

The ratification of the federal Consti- 
tution by the state of New York. 
1921. (Columbia university. Studies 
in history, economics and public law, 
v. 91) 330.5 C72 



Naylor, Emmett Hay. 
Trade associations. 1921. 



338.6 N33 



Olds, Marshall. 

The high cost of strikes. 1921. 

331.89 044 
Pearse, Albert William. 

The world's meat future. 1920. 

338.1 P36 
Prince, Samuel Henry. 

Catastrophe and social change, based 
upon a sociological study of the Hali- 
fax disaster. 1920. (Columbia 
university. Studies in history," eco- 
nomics and public law, v. 94) 

330.5 C72 



Peeve, Sidney Armor. 

Modern economic tendencies. cl921. 

330.973 R33 
Slater, John Arthur. 

Commodities of commerce. [1920] 
(Pitman's commerce series) 

338 S63 
Slesser, Henry H. 

The law relating to trade unions. 1921. 
(Trade union manuals) 331.88 S63 

Yeblen, Thorstein B. 

The engineers and the price system. 
1921. 331 V39 

Watts, Frank. 

An introduction to the psychological 
problems of industry. 1921. 

331.8 W34 
Wcolf, Leonard Sidney. 

Economic imperialism. 1920. (Inter- 
national relations series) 330 W91 

Working conditions, wages and profits, 

by C. W. Price, and others. cl920. 

331.85 W92 

LAW. 

Alverson, Lyle Thomas. 

Digest of American income tax cases. 
1921. 

Bogert, George Gleason. 

Handbook of the law of trusts. 1921. 
(The Hornbook series) 

Callen, Ernest Glenn. 

Administration of the workmen's com- 
pensation act of Nebraska. 1921. 

[Carlisle, Burliugton Majors] 
The notary's manual (7th ed.) based 
upon the sections of the California 
codes relating to notaries public. 
cl921. 

Carter, James Treat. 

The nature of the corporation as a 
legal entity, with especial reference 
to the law of Maryland. 1919. 

Carter, Robert A. & Ransom, William 
Lynn. 
Depreciation charges of railroads and 
public utilties. 

Gift of Robert A. Carter. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



109 



Collier, William Miller. 

The law and practice in bankruptcy 
under the national Bankruptcy act 
of 1S9S. 12th ed. with amendments 
of statutes and rules and all deci- 
sions to August 15. 1920, by Frank 
B Gilbert and Fred E. Rosbrook. 
1921. 2 v. 

Cooper, T. M. & Whyte, W. E. 

The law of housing- and town planning 
in Scotland. 1920 

Elliott, Byron K. & Elliott, William 
Frederick. 
A treatise on the law of railroads. 3d 
ed. cl921. 3 v. 

Hughes, William Taylor. 

The primer of principles. 1921. 

Illinois, Lairs, statutes, etc. 

Annotated statutes of the state of Il- 
linois. 1919. 4 v. 

McMasteb, James Smith 

McAIaster's irregular and regular com- 
mercial paper ; a treatise od the law 
of notes, checks and drafts ; with 
text of the Negotiable instruments 
law. 1920. 

Magee, Harvey White. 

A treatise on the law of national and 
state banks. 3d ed. rev. & enl. 
1921. 

Montgomery, Rob a rt Hiester. 

Excess profits tax procedure, including 
Federal capital stock (excise) tax. 
1921. 

Income tax procedure. 1921. 

Morgan, George Wilson & Parker, Amasa 
Junius. 
Banking law of New York. 6th ed. 
1921. 

Pennsylvania. Laics, statutes, etc. 
Digest of Pennsylvania statute law 
1920 (complete) based on Pepper 
and Lewis' Digest of laws of Penn- 
sylvania, containing all the general 
statutes of the commonwealth down 
to 1920. 1921. 

Stoddard, Elliott Joseph. 

Annotated rules of practice in the 
United States Patent office. 1920. 



Straits Settlements. Supreme court. 

A selection of oriental cases decided in 

the Supreme courts of the Straits' 

Settlements. Collected and arranged 

by Robert Carr Woods, junr. 1S69. 

Thurber, Raymond Duuham. 

A treatise on the federal estate tax. 
1921. 

Wheaton, Carl Crumbie. 

Cases on federal procedure, together 
with judicial code, equity rules, forms 
and questionnaire. 1921. 

Woodruff, Edwin Hamlin. 

A selection of cases on the law of 
domestic relations and persons, 3d 
ed., rev. and enl. 1920. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

Adams, George Burton. 

Constitutional history of England. 
1921 (American historical series) 
342.42 A21c 
Boulnois, Henry Percy. 

Municipal engineering ; surveying the 
scope of municipal engineering and 
the statutory position, the appoint- 
ment, the training, and the duties of 
a municipal engineer. 1921. 

352.5 B76 
Burnett, Edmund Cody, ed. 

Letters of members of the Continental 
congress. 1921. v. 1. (Carnegie 
institution of Washington. Publica- 
tion. Papers of the dept. of histori- 
cal research) q342.73 B9 

Carnegie endowment for international 
peace. Division of international lata. 
Autonomy and federation within em- 
pire ; the British self-governing 
dominions, prepared under the super- 
vision of James Brown Scott 1921. 
(Pamphlet series of the Carnegie 
endowment for international peace. 
Division of international law, no. 33) 
342.42 C29 
Darby, William Evans. 

International arbitration. Interna- 
tional tribunals. 3d ed. eul. 1900. 
341.6 D21i 
Davjs, John William. 

The treaty-making power in the United 

States; an address. 1920. (Oxford 

university. British-American club) 

353 D26? 



110 



news notes of calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



Haines, Charles Grove & Haines, Mrs 
Bertha Harner (Mosher). 
Principles and problems of government. 
cl921. 350 H15 

Holland, Sir Thomas Erskine 

Letters to "the Times" upon war and 
neutrality (1881-1920) with some 
commentary. 3d ed. 1921. 

341.3 H73a 

Oppenheim, Lassa Francis Lawrence. 
. The future of international law. 1921. 

341 062 
Sato, Hiroshi 

Democracy and the Japanese govern- 
ment. cl920. 342.52 S25 

LEAGUE OF NATIONS. 

Lansing, Robert. 

The peace negotiations, a personal nar- 
rative. 1921. 341.1 L29 

The League of nations starts. 1920. 

341.1 L43 
Levermore, Charles Herbert. 

What the league of nations has accom- 
plished in one year, January to 
December, 1920. 1921. q341.1 L6 



Newbigin, Marion Isabel. 
'Aftermath. 1920. 



341.1 N53 



FINANCE. 

Atwood, Albert William. 

The exchanges and speculation. cl91S. 
(Modern business, v. 20) 658 M63 

Campbell, Harry Rrua. 

Legal aspects of the transfer of securi- 
ties. 1920. 332.6 C13 

Foster, Major Bronson. 

Banking. cl918 (Modern business, 
v. 1G) 658 M6S 

Greenwood, William John. 

American and foreign stock exchange 
practice. 1921. 332.6 G81am 

Haig, Robert Murray, [c£- otliers] 
The federal income tax. 1921. 

336.2 H14 
Hunter, Merlin Harold. 

Outlines of public finance. cl921. 

336 H94 
Jordan, David Francis. 

Jordan on investments. 1921. 

332.6 J 82 



Langston, Loyd Helvetius & Whitney, 
Nathan Ruggles. 
Banking practice. 1921. 332.1 L28 

Moulton, Harold Glenn. 

The financial organization of society. 
[1921] (Materials for the study of 
business) 336 M92 

National city bank of New York. 
Practical bank operation, prepared by 
L. H. Langston. 1921. 2 v. 

332.1 N27p 

Patterson, Edward Lloyd Stewart. 
Domestic and foreign exchange. c!918. 
(Modern business, v. 17) 658 M68 

Regan, Joseph M. 
Financing a business. 1920. 658 R33 

Robb, Thomas Bruce. 
The guaranty of bank deposits. 1921. 
(Hart, Schaffner & Marx prize es- 
says) 332.1 R631 

Rossmore, Emerson Emanuel. 

Federal corporate income taxes. 1921. 
336.2 R83 
Travers-Borgstroem, Arthur. 
Mutualism; a synthesis. 1921. 

332.7 T78 
Walker, William Homer. 

Corporation finance. cl918. (Modern 
business, v. 11) ' 658 M68 

Wall, Alexander. 
Analytical credits. cl921. 332.7 W18 

Wiprud, A. Clarence. 

The federal farm-loan system in opera- 
tion. cl921. 332.7 W79 

COMMERCE AND COMMUNICATION. 

Crump, Irving. 

The boys' book of railroads. 1921. 

385 C95 
Eldridge, Frank R. 

Trading with Asia. 1921. 380 E37 

Powell, Fred Wilbur. 

The railroads of Mexico. 1921. 

385 P88 
Preciado, A. A. 

Exporting to the world. 1920. 

382 P92 
Riegel, Robert. 

Merchant vessels. 1921. (Shipping- 
series ; training for the steamship 
business) 387 R55 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



Ill 



Siiaefjian, Isaiah Leo. 

The American railroad problem. 1921. 
(The Century new world series) 

385 S53 

NAVAL & MILITARY ART AND 
SCIENCE. 

Bond, Paul Stanley, d- others. 

The R. O. T. C. manual ; a text book 
for the Reserve officers training 
corps. cT9Sl. [v. 1] Freshman 
course. 355 B71 r 

The red, white and blue manual ; 

. a text book for the Citizens' military 
training camp. [1921] v. 1 Red 
course. 355 B71re 

Insignias of combat and replacement 
divisions of the A. E. F., 1917-191S. 
cl920. 355 159 

Lewis, James C. jr. 

Teaching in the army. cl920. 

355.07 L67 
McNaie, Frederick Yallette. 

Handbook for naval officers. 1920. 

(Van Nostrand's nautical manuals) 

359 M15 

EDUCATION. 

Averill, Lawrence Augustus. 

Psychology for normal schools. 1921. 
(Riverside text books in education. 
Division of secondary education) 

370.1 A95 

Baltimore County. Md. Board of school 
commissioners. 
Course of study, grades I-VIII : pre- 
pared under the direction of Albert 
S. Cook, superintendent. 1921 ed. 
(W-& Y course of study series) 

375 B19 
Beard. Frederica. 

Pictures in religious education. cl920. 

377 B3S 
Gesell, Arnold Lucius. 

Exceptional children and public school 
policy. 1921. 371.9 G39 

Hurt, Huber William. 

Self-help in teaching. 1921. 

371 H96 
Irwin. Robert Benjamin. 

Sight-saving classes in the public 
schools. 1920. 371.9 172 



Kendall, Calvin Noyes. 

How to teach the special subjects. 
cT91S. (Riverside text books in edu- 
cation. Division of secondary educa- 
tion) 371 K33h 

MacElwee, Roy Samuel, & Ritter, Al- 
fred H. 
Economic aspects of the Great Lakes- 
St. Lawrence ship channel. 1921. 

378 M14 

The Manuale scholarium ; an original 
account of life in the mediaeval uni- 
versity, tr. from the Latin by Robert 
Francis Seybolt. 1921. 378 M29 

O'Brien, John Anthony. 

Silent reading, with special reference 
to methods for developing speed ; a 
study in the psychology and peda- 
gogy of reading. 1921. 372.4 013 

Richardson, Myron Wallace. 

Making a high school program. 1921. 
(School efficiency monographs) 

375 R52 
Sechrist, Frank Kleinfelter. 

Education and the general welfare ; a 
text book of school law, hygiene, and 
management 1920. 371.2 S44 

Smedley, Emma. 

The school lunch ; its organization and 
management in Philadelphia. cl920. 
371.7 S63 
Snowden, James Henry. 

The meaning of education. cl921. 

370 S67 
Steiner, Theresa R. 

Games in song for little folks. 1921. 

q 372.2 S8 
Wagner, Charles Adam. 

Common sense in school supervision. 
cl921. 371 W13 

Worst, Edward F. 

Construction work for the primary 
grades. cl920. 372 W93 

Yeomans, Edward. 

Shackled youth. cl921. 370.4 Y46 

CUSTOMS AND FOLKLORE. 

Barrie. Sir James Matthew, hart., 
Peter Pan and Wendy. 1921. 

398 B27p 
Basevi, William Henry Francis. 
The burial of the dead. 1920. 

393 B29 



112 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



Braddy, Nella. 

Young folks' encyclopaedia of etiquette. 
1921. 395 B79 



Curtin, Jeremiah. 

Wonder tales from Russia. 

Griffis, William Elliott. 
Welsh fairy tales, c-1921. 



1921. 
398 C97 

398 G85w 



Pyle, Katherine. 

Lazy Matilda, and other tales. 1921. 

398 P99! 
Stroebe, Clara. 
The Swedish fairy book. cl921. 

398 S91 

Youbtg women's Christian association. 

Bureau of pageantry and thfi drama. 

National costumes of the Slavic 

peoples. 1920. 391 Y78 

LANGUAGE. 

Allen, Philip Schuyler. 

Everyday French. cl920. (Drake's 
practical books for home study) 

448 A42e 

■ '• Everyday 'Spanish. cl920. 



(Drake's practical books for home 
study) 468 A42e 

Beardsley, Wilfred Attwood. 

Infinitive constructions in old Spanish 

1921. (Columbia university studies 

in romance philology and literature) 

465 B36 

Briggs. Fletcher. 

In Amerika. cl920. 438 B85 

Broomhall, Edith J. 

Spanish composition, c-1921. 

465 B87 
Carr, Edwin Hamlin, comp. 

Putnam's minute-a-day English for 
busy people. 1921. 425 C31 

Cohen, Isidore David. 

The gateway to English. 1920. 

428 C67 
Exdicott, Samuel. 

Some rules of Italian pronunciation. 
cl920. 451 E56 

Fotra'NON, Lueien & Broussard, James 
Francis. 
Pour parler frangais. cl921. 

448 F77 



Fraser, William Henry & Squair, John. 

The new Fraser and Squair complete 

French grammar. cl921. 445 F84n 

Galeno, Oscar. 

Spanish. Book 1. cl921. (Galeno 
natural method ; a conventional sys- 
tem of teaching languages) 

468 G15 

Goldbebgee, Henry Harold. 

Second book in English for coming citi- 
zens. cl921. 428 G61-2 

Gourio, E. 

La classe en frangais. cl920. 

445 G71 

Hanssler, William. 

A Spanish reader. cl920. 468 H24s 

Hardie, William Ross. 

Res metrica, an introduction to the 
study of Greek & Roman versifica- 
tion. 1920. 480 H26 

Harrison, Earl Stanley. 

Spanish correspondence. 1921. 

468 H31 
Ives, George Burnham. 

Text, type and style ; a compendium of 
Atlantic usage. cl921. 421 195 

Kbal, Josef Jiff. 
Anglika Skola. 1919. 428 K89 

Method for Bohemians to learn 
English. 

O 'Toole, Rose M. 

Practical English for new Americans. 
cl920. 428 088 

Pence, Raymond Woodbury. 

A manual of the mechanics of writing. 
1921. 421 P39 

Tozzeb, Alfred Marston. 

A Maya grammar, with bibliography 
and appraisement of the works noted. 
1921. (Papers of the Peabody 
museum of American archaeology 
and ethnology, Harvard university, 
v. 9) 570.7 P35 

Tubeell, Charles Alfred, ed. 

Cuentos hispanoamericanos. cl921. 

468 T95c 

Wilkins, Lawrence Augustus. 
Beginners Spanish reader. cl921. 

468 W68b 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



113 



NATURAL SCIENCE: GENERAL. 

Cox, Guy Henry & others. 

Field methods in petroleum geology. 
1921. 553.2 C87 

Morgan, Alfred Powell. 

Boys' home book of science and con- 
struction. [1921] 504 M84 

Redway, Jacques Wardlaw. 

Handbook of meteorology ; a manual 
for co-operative observers and stu- 
dents. 1921. 551.5 R32 

Threlfall, Harold Spencer. 

A textbook on surveying and leveling. 

1920. (Griffin's scientific textbooks) 

526.9 T53 

MATHEMATICS. 

Armstrong, Henry Fry. 

Descriptive geometry for students in 
engineering science and architecture ; 
2d ed. 1920. q515 A7 

Davis, Mrs Nettie Stewart. 

Vocational arithmetic for girls. cl920. 

511 D26 

Edgerton, Edward I. & Bartholomew, 
Wallace Edgar. 
Business mathematics. 1921. 

510 E23 

Griffin, Frank Loxley. 

An introduction to mathematical analy- 
sis. 1921. 517 G85 

Keal, Harry Morton. 

Mathematics for electrical students. 

1921. (The Wiley technical series 
for vocational and industrial schools) 

510 K24 

Keal, Harry Morton & Leonard, Clar- 
ence J. 
Mathematics for shop and drawing 
students. 1921. (The Wiley tech- 
nical series for vocational and indus- 
trial schools) 510 K24m 

Saccheri, Girolamo. 
Girolamo Saccheri's Euclides vindica- 
tus. 1920. 513 S11 



PHYSICS. 

Bird, J. Malcolm, ed. 

Einstein's theories of relativity and 
gravitation. 1921. 530 B61 

Carr, Herbert Wildon. 

The general principle of relativity in 
its philosophical and historical as- 
pect. 1920. 530 C31 

Dent, John Adlum & Harper, Arthur C. 

Kinematics and kinetics of machinery. 

1921. 531.1 D41 



Emswiler, John Edward. 
Thermodynamics. 1921. 



536.7 E54 



Ferry, Ervin Sidney. 

General physics and its application to 
industry and everyday life. 1921. 

530 F39g 

Jones, Franklin Day. 

Temperature indicating and controlling 
systems. 1921. 536.5 J76 

Lind, Samuel Coville. 

The chemical effects of alpha particles 

and electrons. 192L (American 

chemical society. Monograph series) 

537.5 L74 

Sampson, Ralph Allen. 

On gravitation and relativity ; being 
the Halley lecture, delivered on June 
12, 1920. 1920. 531.5 S19 

Seely, Fred B. & Ensign, Newton Ed- 
ward. 

Analytical mechanics for engineers. 

1921. 531 S45 

Starling, Sydney George. 

An introduction to technical electric- 
ity. 1921. (Macmillan's life and 
work series) 537 S79 

AERONAUTICS. 

Dumbleton, J. E. 

Principles and practice of aerial navi- 
gation. 1920. 533.6 D88 



Pratt, H. B. 

Commercial airships. 



[1920] 



533.6 P91 



8—16230 



114 



news notes op California libkaries. [January, 1922 



Williams, Kenneth Powers. 

The dynamics of the airplane. 1921. 
(Mathematical monographs) 

533.6 W72 

CHEMISTRY. 

Bancroft, Wilder Dwight. 

Applied colloid chemistry. 1921. (In- 
ternational chemical series) 

541.1 B21 

Brown, Willis C, & Hall, Malcolm B. 
The orifice meter and gas measurement. 
cl921. 542.7 B88 

Falk, Kaufman George. 

The chemistry of enzyme actions. 1921. 
(American chemical society. Mono- 
graph series) 541.3 F19c 

Fkeund, Ida. 

The experimental basis of chemistry 
1920. 540 F88 

Millikan, Robert Andrews. 

The significance of radium. 1921. 
(California institute of technology 
bulletin, v. 29) c546.43 M65 

Whitmore, Frank Clifford. 

Organic compounds of mercury. 1921. 
(American chemical society mono- 
graphs) 546.5 W61 

BIOLOGY. 

Grant, Madison. 

The passing of the great race. 4th 
rev. ed. 1921. 572 G76a 

Holmes, Samuel Jackson. 

The trend of the race. 1921. 

575.1 H75 
Thomson, John Arthur. 

The control of life. 1921. 570 T48c 

Wilder, Harris Hawthorne. 

A laboratory manual of anthropometry. 
cl920. 573.6 W67I 

BOTANY. 

Livingston, Burton Edward. 

The distribution of vegetation in the 
United States, as related to climatic 
conditions. 1921. q581.973 L7 



Michigan agricultural college, Lansing. 
Dept. of 'bacteriology, hygiene and 
pathology. 
Laboratory manual in general microbi- 
ology. 2d ed. 1921. (Wiley tech- 
nical series) 589.9 M62 

Smith, Erwin Frink. 

An introduction to bacterial diseases of 
plants. 1920. 581.2 S64 

Thatcher, Eoscoe Wilfred. 

The chemistry of plant life. 1921. 
(Agricultural and biographical pub- 
lications) 581.1 T36 

Wilson, Ernest Henry. 

The romance of our trees. 1920. 

582 W74 

NATURAL HISTORY. 

Banta, Arthur Mangun. 

Selection in Cladocera on the basis of 
a physiological character. 1921. 
(Carnegie institution of Washing- 
ton. Publication) q595.3 B2 

Beebe, Charles William. 
Edge of the jungle. 1921. 

591.988 B41e 
Fabre, Jean Henri Casimir. 

Animal life in field and garden. Trans, 
by Florence Constable Bicknell. 
1921. 590 F12 

More hunting wasps. 1921. 

595.7 F12mo 

Hammond, J. & Hainan, E. T. 

A course of practical physiology for 
agricultural students. 1920. 

591 H22 
Harvey, Edmund Newton. 

The nature of animal light. cl920. 
(Monographs on experimental biol- 
ogy) 591.5 H34 

Pearson, Thomas Gilbert, ed. 

Portraits and habits of our birds. 
2 v. 1920'. 598.2 P36p 

USEFUL ARTS: GENERAL. 

Austin, Leonard Strong. 

The metallurgy of the common metals. 
5th ed. 1921. 669 A93a 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



115 



Feiese. John Frank. 
Farm blacksmithint 
cl921. 



textbook. 
682 F91 



Giolitti, Federico. 

Heat treatment of soft and medium 
steels. Tr. by E. E. Thum and 
D. G. Yernaei. 1921. 669.1 G49h 

McFee. Mrs Inez Nellie (Canfield). 
Stories of American inventions. cl921. 

608 M14 
Milliken, Linna Loehr. 

Pine needle basketry ; a complete book 
of instructions. cl920. q689 M6 



Morris, John Yan Liew. 
Employee training. 1921. 



607 M87 



Oberg, Erik Yaldemar. 

Modern apprenticeships and shop train- 
ing methods. 1921. 607 012 



Parkman. Mary Rosetta. 
Conquests of invention. 1921. 



608 P25 



Ralston, Oliver Caldwell. 

Electrolytic deposition and hydromet- 
allurgy of zinc. 1921. 669.5 R16 



Roehl, Louis Michael. 

Harness repairing. cl921. 



685 R71 



ENGINEERING. 
Bowdex-Smith, Edward Cyril. 

The efficiency of pumps and ejectors. 

1920. 621.64 B78 

Clarke, J. Wright. 

Pumps, their principles and construc- 
tion. 2d ed. rev. 1919. 

621.64 C59 

Dana, Richard Turner. 

Handbook of construction equipment. 

1921. 620 D16h 

Dunkley, William George. 

Belts for power transmission. [1920] 

(Pitman's technical primer series') 

621.8 D91 

Hammond, John Hays. 

The engineer. 1921. (Yocational 
series) 620 H22 

Hart, Edward. 

A textbook of chemical engineering. 
1920. 621.9 H325 



Hovgaard, William. 

Modern history of warships. 1920. 

q623.8 HJ 



Jones. Franklin Day. 
Cylinder boring, reaming 
1921. 



and grinding. 
621.9 J76c 



Longfield, Ellsworth M. 

Sheet metal drafting. 1921. (Indus- 
trial education series) 621.9 L85 



Prochaska, Ernst. 
Coal washing. 1921. 



522.7 P96 



Rickard, Thomas Arthur, ed. 

Concentration by flotation. 1921. 
622.7 R48 

"A compilation of articles appearing 
in the Mining and scientific press 
during the years 1915 to 1920." 

Shelly, Joseph Atkinson. 

Patternmaking, a treatise on the con- 
struction and application of pat- 
terns. 1920. 621.7 S54 



Shipbuilding cyclopedia. 



c-1920. 

qr623.8 S5 



Waddell, John Alexander Low. 

Economics of bridgework, a sequel to 
Bridge engineering. 1921. 

624 W11e 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

American automobile digest. 

Home-farm power and lighting. 1920. 
621.3 A51h 

Axxett, Fred Anzley. 

Electrical machinery ; a practical 
study course ou installation, opera- 
tion and maintenance. 1921. 

621.3 A61 

Croft, Terrell, Williams, camp. 

American electricians' handbook. 2d 
ed. 1921. 621.3 C94a 

Dudley, Adolphus Mansfield. 

Connecting induction motors ; the 
practical application of a designing 
engineer's experience to the prob- 
lems of operating engineers, arma- 
ture winders and repair men. 1st 
ed. 1921. 621.31 D84 

First published in the "Electric 
iournal" in February, 1916. 



116 



news notes op califoknia libraries. [January, 1922 



Dunn, Lucius Claude. 

Storage battery manual, including 
principles of storage battery con- 
struction and design. 1920. 

621.35 D92 

Hen nig, W. E. 

How to wind direct current arma- 
tures. [1920] q621.31 H5 

Peek, Frank William. 

Dielectric phenomena in high voltage 
engineering. 2d ed. 1920. . 

621.34 P37 

Russell, Alexander. 

The theory of electric cables and net- 
works. 1920. 621.34 R96 

TELEGRAPHY. 
Bentley, E. L. 

The telegraphic table code. 1921. 

q654 B4a 

Moreceoft, John Harold, [and others'] 

Principles of radio communication. 

1921. 654 M83 



Pendry, H. W. 

Elementary telegraphy. 1921. 



AUTOMOBILES. 

Bayston, John Robert. 
The Ford car. 1921. 



654 P39 



625.6 B36 



Manley, Harold Phillips. 

The motor cycle handbook, the con- 
struction, operation, care and re- 
pair of modern types of motor 
cycles. 1920. 625.6 M27m 

Moyer, James Ambrose. 

Gasoline automobiles. 1921. 

625.6 M93 
Page, Victor Wilfred. 

The modern motor truck ; a complete 
treatise on all forms of motor 
trucks propelled by gasoline or elec- 
tric power. 1921. 625.6 P13mt 

AGRICULTURE. 

Babbitt, Shirley Dare & Wimberly, 
Lowry Charles, eds. 
Essays on agriculture. 1921. 

630 B112 



Hayes, Herbert Kendall & Garber, 
Ralph John. 
Breeding crop plants. 1921. (Agri- 
cultural and biological publications) 
630 H41 
Morris, Robert T. 

Nut growing. 1921. 634.5 M87 

Sanderson, Ezra Dwight. 

Insect pests of farm, garden and 
orchard. 1921. 632 S21a 

Stoddart, Charles William. 
The chemistry of agriculture. 1921. 

630 S85 
Storm, Ashley Van. 

How to teach agriculture. cl921. 

630.7 S88 
Woolsey, Theodore Salisbury. 

Studies in French forestry. 1920. 

834.9 W91s 

DOMESTIC ANIMALS. 

California. Cattle protection board. 
Cattle brands and licensed slaughter- 
ers. 1919. c836.2 C15 
Gift of California cattle protection 
board. 

Davies, C. J. 
Goat - keeping 
1920. 



for milk production. 
636.3 D25g 



Nourse, Harold Alvah. 

The Wyandotte standard and breed 
book. cl919. 636.5 N93 

Platt, Frank L. 

The Americau breeds of poultry. 
cl921. 636.5 P71 

Richards, Irmagarde. 

Modern milk goats. cl921. 

c636.3 R51 

Savage, Elmer Seth & Morrison, Frank 
Barron. 
Feeds and feeding manual. cl920. 

636 S26 
Spaulding, Roy Henry. 

Tour dog and your cat, how to care 
for them in the home. 1921. 

636.7 S73 

DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Abel, Mrs Mary W. (Hinman). 

Successful family life on the moderate 
income. cl92L 647 A14 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, 



117 



Doxhaii, S. Agnes. 

Spending the family income. 1921. 

647 D68 
Gallaxd, William Herbert. 

The proper feeding of infants. cl920. 
(The parents' library) 649 G16 

Hamilton, Dorothy M. 

A primer of cooking. 1921. 641 H21 

Hatters supply house, Chicago. 

Instructions in hat cleaning, renovat- 
ing and blocking given by an expert 
hatter. [1920] 646 H36 

Maetin, Mrs Gene Allen. 

Make your own hats. 1921. 

646.5 M88 
Richakds, Paul. 

Cakes for bakers. 1921. 64l' R517c 

Spencer, Evelene & Cobb, John Nathan. 
Fish cookery. 1921. 641 S745 

MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 

Ash, Edwin Lancelot. 

Mental self-help. 1920. 615.85 A81 

Browx, William . 

Psychology and psychotherapy. 1921. 

616.8 B88 

Bbowx, William & Thomson, Godfrey 
Hilton. 
The essentials of mental measurement. 
1921. (Cambridge psychological li- 
brary) 612.8 B381 

Burxham, Frederick W. E. 

Haemocytes and hsemic infections ; a 
hand-book for students and practi- 
tioners. 1913. 616.1 B96 

Child, Charles Manning. 

The origin and development of the 
nervous system from a physiological 
viewpoint. [1921] (The Univer- 
sity of Chicago science series) 

612.8 C53 

Collis. Edgar Leigh [tC- others]. 

The health of the industrial worker. 
1921, q613.6 C7 

Gaines, Thomas Robert. 

Yitalic breathing. ci921. 613.7 G14 

Gai.l.vxd, William Herbert. 

Diseases of infancy and childhood. 
cl920. (The parent's library) 

618.9 G16d 



Maternity and child care. cl920. 

(The parent's library) 618.2 G16 

Galloway, Thomas Walton. 
The father and his boy. 1921. 

612.6 G17f 

Jamme, Anna C. 

Textbook of nursing procedures. 1921. 
610.73 J32 

Jelliffe, Smith Ely. 

The technique- of psychoanalysis, 2d 
rev. and enl. ed. 1920. (Nervous 
and mental disease monograph 
series) 616.8 J48 

Kixgslet, Albert Thomas. 

Swine practice. 1921. (Veterinary 
practitioners' series) 619.4 K56a 

Levy, Paul Emile. 

The rational education of the will ; its 
therapeutic value. Tr. from the 
9th ed. by Florence K. Bright. 

1920. 615.85 L66 

LoosiiOEE, William Charles. 

Nerves and the man. 1921. 

616.8 L86 
McMillan, Mary. 

Massage and therapeutic exercise. 

1921. 615.82 M16 

Newsholme, Sir Arthur. 

Public health and insurance. 1920. 

614.04 N55 

Pottenger, Fraucis Marion. 

Tuberculosis and how to combat it. 
1921. 616.99 P86 

Quimey, Phineas Parkhurst. 

The Quimby manuscripts. cl921. 

615.85 Q6 

Rose, Mrs Mary (Swartz). 

A laboratory handbook for dietetics. 
1921. 613.2 R79I 

Salxders, Charles Greatley. 

Rabbit and cat diseases. 1920. (Vet- 
erinary medicine series) 619.9 S25 

Savage. William George. 

Food poisoning and food infections. 
1920. (Cambridge public health 
series) 614.3 S26fo 



Skarstrom, William. 
Gymnastic teaching. 



1921. 613.7 S62 



118 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



Stopes, Marie Charlotte Carmichael. 
Radiant motherhood, a book for those 
who are creating the future. 1920. 
618.2 S38 
Stowell, William Leland. 

Sex, for parents and teachers. 1921. 

612.6 S89 
Wilson, Robert Morrison. 

The care of human machinery. 1921. 
613.6 W75 

MANUFACTURES. 

Colvin, Fred Herbert. 

The working of steel. 1921. 

672 G72 
Foltzer, Joseph. 

Artificial silk and its manufacture. 
1921. 877 F67 

Keir, Robert Malcolm. 

Manufacturing industries in America. 
1920. 670 K27 

Salade, Robert Francis. 

How paper boxes are made. 1920. 

676 S15 
Simmons, Hezzleton E. 

Rubber manufacture ; the cultivation, 
chemistry, testing, and manufacture 
of rubber. 1921. q678 S5 

Tiemann, Harry Donald. 

The kiln drying of lumber ; a practi- 
cal and theoretical treatise. 1920. 
674 T56 
Wheelwright, William Bond. 

From paper-mill to pressroom. 1920. 

676 W56 
Whitby, George Stafford. 

Plantation rubber and the testing of 
rubber. 1920. 678 W57 

BUILDING. 
Bigelow, Carle M. 

Installing management in woodwork- 
ing plants. 1920. 694 B59 

Emerson, David B. 

Modern building superintendence and 
thx. writing of specifications. 1921. 
692 E53 
Fairham, William. 

Woodwork joints ; how they are set 
out, how made and where used. 
[1918?] (Woodworker series) 

694 F17w 



Portland cement association. 

Concrete for irrigation canals. 

691.3 P85 
Spalding, Frederick Putnam. 

Masonry structures. 1921. 693 S73 

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. 

California food products directory, v. 
1. 1920. rc664 C15 

Ellis, Carleton & Meigs, Joseph V. 
Gasoline and other motor fuels. 1921. 
665.5 E47 

Fischer, Martin Henry \_& others]. 
Soaps and proteins. 1921. 668.1 F52 

Hale, Harrison. 

American chemistry ; a record of 

achievement, the basis for future 

progress. 1921. 660 H 16 

McLaughlin, Roy Pamielee. 

Oil land development and valuation. 
1921. c665.5 M16 



Malinovszkt, Andrew. 
Ceramics, 1921. 



666 M25 



Murke, Franz. 

Condensed description of the manu- 
facture of beet sugar. 1921. 

664.1 M97 

Sibley, Robert & Delany, Charles H. 
Elements of fuel oil and steam engi- 
neering. 2d ed. 1921. 662.6 S56a 

Taylor, Hugh Stott. 

Fuel production and utilization. 1920. 
(Industrial chemistry) 682.6 T24 

WELDING. 

Dunton, M. W., company, Providence. 



"How to solder. 1919. 
Gift. . 

Page, Victor Wilfred. 
Modern welding methods. 

Swift, Henry Bevan. 
Practical electric welding. 



671 D92 



1921. 

671 P13 

1919. 
671 S97 



Viall, Ethan. 

Gas torch and thermit welding. 1st 
ed. 1921. 671 V61 



— Electric welding. 1921. 



671 V61e 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



119 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 

Basset, William Rupert. 

The organization of modern business. 
1921. 658 B31 

Butler, Ralph Starr. 

Marketing methods. el91S. (Modern 
business, v. 5) 658 M68 

Carpenter, Charles U. 

Increasing production, decreasing 
costs. 1920. 658 C29i 

Clapp, Edwin Jones. 

Railway traffic. cl91S. (Modern 
business, v. 11) 658 M68 

Commons, John Rogers. 

Industrial government. 1921. 

658 C73 
Cook; Luella Bussey. 

A project book in business English. 
cl920. 658 C771 

Economics of business. I — Production, 
consumption and value, by J. F. 
Johnson ; II — Exchange and dis- 
tribution, by F. L. McXey. cl91S. 
(Modern business, v. 2) 658 M68 

Galloway, Lee. 

Factory and office administration. 
cl91S. (Modern business, v. 4) 

658 M68 
Gerstenberg, Charles W. 

Organization and control. c!918. 
(Modern business, v. 3) 658 M68 

Hardy, Edward Rochie & Field, Fred- 
erick William. 
Insurance. cl918. (Modern business, 
v. IS) 658 M68 

lVY, Paul Wesley. 

Principles of marketing. 1921. 

658 I95p 
Jenks, Jeremiah Whipple. 

Business and the government. cI91S. 
(Modern business, v. 24) 

658 M68 
Johnson, Joseph French. 

Business and the man. cl91S. (Mod- 
ern business, v. 1) 658 M68 

Jones. Edward David. 

Industrial leadership and executive 
ability, lessons to be drawn from 
the history *>f war, science and 
statecraft. 1920. (Industrial man- 
agement library) 658 J76i 



Jones, John George. 

Salesmanship and sales management. 
cl91S. (Modern business, v 7) 

658 M68 
Kitson, Harry Dexter. 

The mind of the buyer. 1921. 

658 K62 

Lindner, Walter cC- Bicknell, Alfred. 
Real estate. cl91S. (Modem .busi- 
ness, v. IS) 658 M68 

The management and the worker, by 
George F. Johnson [and others]. 
cl920. 658 M265 

Muscto, Bernard. 

Lectures on industrial psychology. 
1920. (Efficiency books) 658 M98 

Simons, Algie Martin. 

Personnel relations in industry. 1921. 

653 S61 
Spicher, Craig Reno. 

The practice of presswork. 1919. 

655.3 S75 

Swinney, John Bayly. 

Merchandising. cl91S. (Modern busi- 
ness, v. 19) 658 M68 

Wahlstad, Peter P. 

Credit and the credit man. cl91S. 
(Modern business, v. S) 658 M68 

The way to greater production, by 
Homer S. Trecartin, [and others]. 
cl920. 658 W35 

Whitehead, Harold. 
How to run a store. „cl921. 

658 W59h 
Zimmerman, Erich Walter. 

Foreign trade and shipping. cl91S. 
(Modern business, v. 15) 658 M68 

COMMERCIAL CORRESPONDENCE. 

Barroll, Edward C. cd. 

Making money in the mail order mint. 
cl915. 658 B277 

LEytinge, Louis Victor], 
Writing business letters which get the 
business. cl915. (The pocket book 
series) 658 E98 

Hotchkiss. George Burton & Kilduff, 
Edward Jones. 
Advanced business correspondence. 
1921. 658 H832 



120 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



Mc Johnston, Harrison. 

Business correspondence. cl918. (Mod- 
ern business, v. 12) 658 M68 

Miles, Dudley Howe. 

English in business, for students in 
commercial and general secondary 
schools. 1920. 658 M64 

ACCOUNTING. 

Bennett, George Edward. 

Accounting, principles and practice. 
1920-1921. 2 vols. 657 B471 

Elboubne, Edward Tregaskiss. 

Factory administration and cost ac- 
counts. New ed. 1921. 658 E37a 

First edition, 1914, published under 
title : Factory administration and 
accounts. 

Esqueeee, Paul Joseph. 

Practical accounting problems, theory, 
discussion, and solutions. 1921. v. 1. 
q657 E7 
Haeeison, George Charter. 

Cost accounting to aid production ; a 
practical study of scientific cost ac- 
counting. 1921. 657 H31 

Kimball, Dexter Simpson. 

Cost finding. cl918. (Modern busi- 
ness, v. 10) 658 M68 

Madden, John Thomas. 

Accounting practice and auditing. 
cl918. (Modern business, v. 21) 

658 M6S 
Mitchell, Thomas Warner. 

Accounting principles. cl918. (Mod- 
ern business, v. 9) 658 M68 

ADVERTISING. 

Blanchabd, Frank Le Boy. 

The essentials of advertising. 1921. 

659 B63 
Dean, Arthur W. 

Modern publicity. 1921. 659 D28 

De Bowee, Herbert Francis. 

Advertising principles. cl918. (Mod- 
ern business, v. 6) 658 M68 

Fischee, Albert T. 

Window and store display. 1921. 

659 F52 
Hall, Samuel Poland. 

The advertising handbook. 1921. 

659 H17 



Higham, Charles Frederick. 

Looking forward ; mass education 
through publicity. 1920. 659 H63I 

Manly, John Matthews & Powell, John 
Arthur. 
Better advertising. cl921. (Better 
business books) 659 M27 

Maetin, Mac. 

Advertising campaigns. cl918. (Mod- 
ern business, v. 13) 658 M68 

Osbobn, Alexander Faickney. 

A short course in advertising. 1921. 

659 081 

Ramsay, Robert E. 

Effective direct advertising. 1921. 

659 R18e 

FINE ARTS: GENERAL. 

Blum, Clara M. 

Old world lace. cl920. 746 B65 

Buenet, Mrs Mary (Quick). 

Art and artists of Indiana. 1921. 

795.1 B96 

Charles, C. J. 

Old English interiors. 3d ed. 1919. 

q747 C4 

Collamoee, Gilman & co., inc., "New 
York. 
Traditions and old china. cl920. 

738 C69 

Earle, Olive. 

Lampshades : how to make them. 
1921. 749 E12 

Evans, Maria Millington (Lathbury) 
lady. 
Lustre pottery. 1920. q738 E9 

Felice, Roger de. 

French furniture under Louis xvi and 
the empire. 1920. 749 F13f 

Gaednee, John Starkie. 

English ironwork of the 17th and 18th 
centuries. [1911] 739 G22 

Hartley, Marsden. 

Adventures in the arts. cl921. 

704 H33 

Hegei, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich. 

The philosophy of fine art. 1920. 4 v. 

701 H46 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



12] 



Leake, William Martin. 

Numismata hellenica : a catalogue of 
Greek coins. 1S56. q737 L4 



Mickel, Adelaide. 
Stenciling. cl920. 



745 M62 



Xobthend, Mary Harrod. 

The art of home decoration. 1921. 

749 N87 

Smith, Vincent Arthur. 

A history of fine art in India and 
Ceylon, from the earliest times to 
the present day. 1911. q709.54 SS 

DRAWING. 

Bailey, Charles H. 

Mechanical drawing for beginners, giv- 
ing the fundamental technic of mod- 
em practice. cl920. 744 B15 

Bishop, Carlton Thomas. 

Structural drafting and the design of 
details. 1920. 744 B62 



Cole, Rex Vicat. 
Perspective. 1921. 



742 C68 



Geobge, Vincent Columbus. 

Advanced shop drawing. 1920. (En- 
gineering education series) 744 G34 

Glass, Frederick J. 

Drawing, design, and craft-work for 
teachers, students, etc. [1920] 

740 G54 

Knight, Laura. 

Twenty-one drawings of the Russian 
ballet. 1920. f741 K6 

Lutz, Edwin George. 

Drawing made easy. 1921. 740 L97 

Magonigle, Harold Van Buren. 

Architectural rendering in wash. 1921. 

q744 M2 

Moese, Mrs Lucy (Gibbons). 

Breezes. 1921. 741 M885 



Rimmee, William. 

- Art anatomy. cl90o. 



q743 R5 



Rowaeth. Ernest. 

The engineering draughtsman. [1919] 

744 R87 

The standabd American show card 
book, the modern art of show card 
writing. cl919. 745 S78 



ENGRAVING. 

Beown, Bolton. 

J. J. Lankes : painter-graver on wood. 
1921. 761 L28 

Holman, Louis Arthur. 

Hornby's etchings of the great war. 
1921. 767 H74 

List of plates. 

Lascelles, T. W. 

Engraving. [1920]. (Pitman's common 
commodities and industries) 

760 L34 

Salaman, Malcolm Charles, ed. 

The charm of the etcher's .art. 1920. 

f769 S1c 

PAINTING. 

Bebuete y Moeet, Aureliano de. 

Spanish painting. 1921. q759.6 B5 

Gauguin, Paul. 

Paul Gauguin's intimate journals, tr. 
by Van Wyck Brooks. 1921. 

q759.9 G2 
Xouguchi. Tone. 

Hiroshige. 1921. q759.92 N7 

Shannon, Charles Hazelwood. 

Charles Shannon, A. E. A. ; an essay by 
"Tis" [pseud.] with eleven illustra- 
tions. [1920] (Masters of modern 
art) q759.2 S5 

Wabd, James. 

History and methods of ancient & 
modern painting. 1913-1920. 3 v. 
751 W25 
Williamson, George Charles. 
The miniature collector. 1921. 

757 W72m 

Yaeeow, William, & Bouche, Louis, eds. 
Robert Henri. 1921. q759.1 H5y 

SCULPTURE. 

Dickens, Guy. 

Hellenistic sculpture. 1920. 733 D55 

Maeeiage, Mrs Margaret S. & Marriage, 
Ernest. 

The sculptures of Chartres cathedral. 

1909. 726 M35 

Taft. Lorado. 

Modern tendencies in sculpture. [1921] 
(The Scammon lectures for 1917) 
730 T12 



122 



news notes op calipobnia libRxIries. [January, 1922 



PHOTOGRAPHY. 

Fraprie, Frank Roy. 

Cash from your camera ; how to make 
your camera profitable, and where 
to sell your prints. 1921. 770 F83c 

Lan-Davis, Cyril Frederick. 

Telephotography. 1921. 778 L25 

Pictorial photography in America. 
1921. q770 P6 

Rose, Leon Goodwin. 

The commercial photographer. 1920. 

q770 R7S 
Stine, George F. 

The air brush in photography, incor- 
porating a progressive series of les- 
sons. 1920. q770 S8 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 
King, Louisa (Yeomans) "Mrs Francis 
King." 
The little garden. cl921. 716 K53l 

Pages from a garden note-book. 

1921. 716 K53 

Tabor, Grace. 

Come into the garden. 1921. 

710 T11c 
Taylor, Albert D. 

The complete garden. 1921. 

q710 T2 
Wright, Richardson Little. 

House & garden's book of gardens. 

q710 W9 

ARCHITECTURE. 
Dewsnap, William. 

Country and suburban houses. 1920. 

q723 D5 

Donovan, John J. 

School architecture. 1921. q727 D6 

Moore, Charles. 

Daniel H. Burnham, architect, plan- 
ner of cities. 1921. q720.19 B9 

Cutwater, Herbert G. 

Designs for American homes. Designs 
by Charles M. Noble, and drawing? 
by H. R. Shurtleff. 1921. 

q 728 05 

Phillips, R. Randal. 

The book of bungalows. 1920. 

728 P56 



Samson, George Gordon. 

Houses, villas, cottages and bungalows 
for Britishers and Americans abroad. 
2d ed. 1920. 728 S19h 

Tralle, Henry Edward & Merrill, 

George Earnest. 

Planning church buildings, cl921. 

(Judson training manuals for the 

school of the church) 726 T76 

MUSIC. 

Arnold, Samuel. 

Cathedral music. 1790. 4 v. 

f783 A7 

Audsley, George Ashdown. 

Organ-stops and their artistic regis- 
tration. cl921. 786.6 A91 

Botsford, Florence Hudson, comp. and 

ed. 

Folk songs of many peoples, with 

English versions by American poets. 

cl921. v. 1. q784.4 B7 

Burlin. Mrs Natalie (Curtis) ed. 
Songs and tales from the dark conti- 
nent. 1920. q784.4 B96 



Dry, Wakeling. 

Nights at the opera. 



782.2 D79 



Forkel, Johann Nikolaus. 

Johnanu , Sebastian Bach. ; his life, 
art, and work. 1920. 780.2 B118f 

Heyman, Katherine Ruth Willoughby. 
The relation of ultramodern to archaic 
music. cl921. c780.4 H61 

Isaacson, Charles David. 

Face to face with great musicians. 
Second group. 1921. 780.19 I74 

Jaques-Dalcroze, Eniile. 

Rhythm, music and education. 1921. 

780.7 J36 

Melitz, Leo Leop. & Hackney, Louise 
Wallace. 
The opera goers" complete guide. 1921. 

782 M52a 
Sonneck, Oscar Theodore. 

Miscellaneous studies in the history of 
music. 1921. 780.4 S69m 

Who's who in music in California. 
1920. c780.19 W62 

Edited by W. Francis Gates, 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



123 



AMATEUR THEATRICALS. 

Baebee, Lindsey. 

When the clock strikes twelve ; a 
coinedy-drama in three acts. cl921. 
(Denison's select plays) 793 B23w 

Barntjm, Madalene Demarest. 

Our aunt from California ; a farce in 
one act. cl903. (French's inter- 
national copyrighted ed. of the 
works of the best authors) 

793 B26 
Bridgham, Gladys Ruth. 

Golden hope ; a play for girls, in two 
acts. 1921. 793 B85 

Crandaix, Irene Jean. 

A cabin courtship : a comedy in three 
acts. cl921. (Denison's select 
plays) 793 C89 

Draper, George Orrin. 

School, church, and home games. 1921. 

793 D76 
Dxjnton, Edith Kellogg. 

Is your name Smith? A comedy in 
one act. 1921. 793 D92 

Freed, Clarence I. 

Absent minded ; a sketch in one act. 
cl920. 793 F85 

Fry. Robert J. 

The salvation of Jemmy Slang. cl920. 

793 F94 
Haines, C. R. 

The play of Pilgrim's progress adapted 
from Bunyan. [1920] 793 H15 



Macauley, Ward. 
His city girl. 1921. 



793 M117 



CHILDREN'S PLAYS. 

Burrows, Edith Maie. 

Behind the rain curtains ; a play for 
children. 1921. 793.2 B97b 

Our motherland ; a patriotic 



pageant play in eight episodes. 1921. 
793.2 B97o 
Moses, Montrose Jonas, cd. 

A treasury of plays for children. 1921. 
793.2 M91 

Thomason, Caroline Wasson. 
Beauty and the beast. 1921. 

793.2 T46b 



Bluebeard. 1921. 



793.2 T46 



Cinderella. 1921. 



793.2 T46c 



Red riding hood. 1920. 

793.2 T46r 

The three bears. 1921. 

793.2 T46t 
Williams, E. Harcourt. 

Four fairy plays. 1920. 793.2 W72 

RECREATION. 

Camp, Walter Chauncey. 

Training for sports. 1921. 796 C18t 

Daly, Charles Dudley. 

American football. 1921. 797 D15 

Einert, Margaret Therese. 

The rhythmic dance book. 1921. 

793.1 E35 
Frost, Helen. 
The clog dance book. 1921. 

q793.1 F9 

Hewitt, Charles Gordon. 
The conservation of the wild life of 
Canada. 1921. 799 H61 

Kephart, Horace. 

Camping and woodcraft. [New ed.] 
1921. 796 K38a 

Knight, Edward Frederick.- 

Small-boat sailing. 1920. 797 K69 

McGuire, J. A. 

In the Alaska-Yukon game-lands. 
cl921. 799 M14 

Ouimet, Francis. 

Golf facts for young people. 1921. 

796 093 
Robertson, Greta. 
The book of conundrums. cl921. 

793 R64 

Rutledge, Archibald Hamilton. 
Old plantation days. cl921. 

799 R98o 
Strouse. Arthur Howard. 

Ideas for children's parties, c-1921. 

793 S92 

White, Eustace E. 

Learning to play field hockey, includ- 
ing a plan for organization of field 
hockey in colleges and schools by 
Marie L, Cams. cl920. (Spalding 
"Red cover" series of athletic hand- 
books) 796 W583I 



124 



news notes op CALIFORNIA libraries. [January, 1922 



AVhite, Jack. 
Putting. 1921. 



796 W585 



LITERATURE. 

Apollodokus, of Athens. 

Apollodorus, The library, with an 
English translation by Sir James 
George Frazer. 1921. 2 v. (The 
Loeb classical library) 888 A64 

Beaconsfield, Benjamin Disraeli, Jst 
earl of. 
A day-book of Benjamin Disraeli, 
chosen by Mrs Henry Head. 1920. 
828 B36 
Benton, Philip Ask ell, comp. 
A book of anniversaries. 191S. 

808.8 B478 

Bergengren, Ralph Wilhelm. 
The seven ages of man. cl921. 

814 B49s 
Brawley, Benjamin Griffith. 

A short history of the English drama. 
1921. 822.09 B82 

Brooks, Charles Stephen. 

Hints to pilgrims. 1921. 814 B87h 

Broun, Heywood Campbell. 
Seeing things at night. 1921. 

814 B875 
Bruno, Guido. 

Fragments from Greenwich village. 
1921. 814 B89 

Burgess, Gelett. 

My maiden effort ; being personal con- 
fessions of well-known American au- 
thors. 1921. 808 B95 

Burroughs, John. 

Under the maples. 1921. 818 B97un 

Cadmus, pseud. 

The island of sheep. 1920. 823 C12 

Chandler, Frank Wadleigh. 

The contemporary drama of France. 
1921. (Contemporary drama series) 

842.09 C45 
Clutton-Brock, Arthur. 

Essays on books. 1921. 804 C64 

Colby, Frank Moore. 

The margin "of hesitation. 1921. 

814 C68m 
Cooper, Frederic Taber, ed. 

An argosy of fables. cl921. q828 C7 



Croce, Benedetto. 

Ariosto, Shakespeare and Corneille. 

1920. 809 C93 

Daly, Arnold. 

The dominant male ; essays and plays. 

1921. 814 D15 

Contents: The dominant male. — 
Playing golf. ■ — Father and son. ■ — 
James Stephens — an appreciation. — 
Democracy's king. — Why Shakes- 
peare's plays could only have been 
written by an actor. — Between our- 
selves. — Artistic reasoning. — Gossip. 
— Letters — from and to the author. 

Deming, Norma Helen. 

Pieces for every day the schools cele- 
brate. cl921. 808.8 D38 

Dobson, Austin. 

Later essays 1917-1920. 1921. 

824 D63! 
Ellis, Havelock. 

Impressions and comments. 1920. 2d 
series, 1914-1920. 824 E46 

Elton, Oliver. 

A survey of English literature, 1780- 
1830. 2 v. 1920. 820.9 E51 



Flecker, James Elroy. 
Collected prose. 1920. 



S24 F59 



Gardiner, Florence Herrick, comp. 
Limericks. 1921. ' 827 G22 

Gosse, Edmund William. 
Books on the table. [1921] 804 G67 

Guthrie, Anna Lorraine. 

Contemporary American literature ; a 
study outline. 1917. (Study out- 
line series) 810.2 G98 

Hackett, Francis. 

On American books. 1920. 810.4 H12 

Hale, William Bayard. 

The story of a style. 1920. 808 H16 

Hardin, Charlotte. 

Coins and medals. 1921. 818 H26 

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. 

The scarlet letter ; a romance by 
Nathaniel Hawthorne with illustra- 
tions by Hugh Thomson. [1920] 

q813 H3 

Hearn, Lafcadio. 

Books and habits. Edited by John 
Erskine. 1921. 814 H43b 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY . 



125 



Henry, Stuart Oliver. 

French essays and profiles. cl921. 

840.9 H52 
Holliday, Robert Cortes. 

Turns about town. cl921. 814 H73t 



Inge, William Ralph. 

Outspoken essays. 1920. 



824 145 



The John Keats memorial volume. 1921 . 

q821 K2zj 
Jones, Henry Arthur. 

The foundations of a national drama ; 
a collection of lectures, essays and 
speeches, delivered and written in 
the years 1896-1912. (Revised and 
corrected, with additions) 1913. 

822.09 J77f 
Lodge, Henry Cabot. 

The Senate of the United States, and 
other essays and addresses historical 
and literary. 1921. 814 L82s 



Lynd, Robert. 

The art of letters. 1920. 



820.4 L98 



Manly, John Matthews cG Rickert, 
Edith. 
Contemporary British literature. 1921. 
820.2 M27 
Masson, Thomas Lansing. 

Well, why not? 1921. 814 M421 

Matthews, James Brander. 

Essays on English. 1921. 814 M43e 

New York drama league. Little theatre 
dept. 
Plays for amateurs ; a selected list. 
1921. q 808.21 N5 

Nicholson, Meredith. 

The man in the street ; papers on 
American topics. 1921. 814 N62 



Soper, Henry Marlin, ed. 
Soper's dialect readings. 



808.8 S71 



Stedman, Edmund. Clarence. 

The nature and elements of poetry. 
1892. 808.1 S81 

Strong, John Ruggles. 

Note upon the "dark lady" series of 
Shakspeare's sonnets. 1921. 

822.33 Y8s 
Strunsky, Simeon. 

Sinbad and his friends. 1921. 

818 S92s 



Undeehill, Evelyn. 

Jacopone da Todi, poet and mystic, 
1228-1306. 1919. 851 J18zu 

Warner, Frances Lester & Warner, 
Gertrude Chandler. 
Life's minor collisions. 1921. 

814 W28I 
Webb, William Trego. 

How to write an essay, with sample 
essays and subjects for essays. 
New and enl. ed. 1920. 808 W36 

POETRY. 

Aiken, Conrad Potter. 

The house of dust ; a symphony. 1920. 

811 A29h 

Alden, Raymond Macdonald. 

Poems of the English race. 1921. 

808.1 A35p 
Anthony, Edward. 

Merry-go-roundelays. 1921. 811 A62 

Baring, Maurice. 

' Poems: 1914-1917. [1920] 821 B25 



Beers, Henry Augustin. 
Poems. 1921. 



811 B415 



Burdett, Osbert. 

The idea of Coventry Patmore. 1921. 
821 P31zb 
Campbell, Kenneth. 

John Masterson. 1921. c811 C188 

Carter, William. 

The gates of Janus ; an epic story of 
the world war. cl919. 811 C325 

Cleanthes. 

The hymn of Cleanthes. 1921. 

889.1 C62 
Davison, Edward Lewis, comp. 

Cambridge poets 1914-1920. 1920. 

821.08 D26 

Dodge, Philip Henry. 

The voice of Kegon Fall. c811 D645 

Fee, Harry T. 

The land of out o' doors. cl921. 

c811 F29 

Fellowes, Edmund Horace, ed. 
English madrigal verse. 1920. 

821.08 F32 
Fort, Paul. 

Selected poems and ballads. 1921. 

841 F73s 



126 



news notes op calipornia libraeies. [January, 1922 



Freeman, John. 

Poems new and old. 1920. 821 F85 

Georgian poetry, 1918-1919. 1920. 

821.08 G35a2 

Goodeix, Thomas Dwight. 

Commemmoration, and other verses. 
1921. 811 G64 

Graves, Robert. 

The pier-glass. [1921] 821 G7762p 

Greene, Clay Meredith. 

Verses of love, sentiment and friend- 
ship. 1921. c811 G79v 

Guiterman, Arthur. 

A ballad-maker's pack. c!921. 

811 G96ba 
Kreymborg, Alfred. 

Blood of things ; a second book of free 
forms. 1920. 811 K92b 

Lampson, • Myrle Robbins. 

On reaching sixteen and other verses. 
cl916. c811 L23 

Le Btjffe, Francis P. 

The hound of heaven ; an interpreta- 
tion. 1921. 821 T47zl 

Leonard, Sterling Andrus, camp. 

Poems of the war and the peace. 1921. 

808.1 L58 

[MacDonnell, James Carlin] 
The cairn of stars. 1920. 811 M136 

Marsh, Daniel Lash. 

The faith of the people's poet. cl920. 
811 R57zm 

Mathers, Edward Powys. 

The garden of bright waters. 1920. 

895.1 M42 

Metcalf, John Calvin & Wilson, James 
Southall, eds. 
The enchanted years. 1921. 

811.08 M58 

Mixter, Florence Kilpatrick. 

Out of mist. cl921. 811 M685 

Myers, Frederic William Henry. 

Collected poems. 1921. 821 M99c 

Owen, Wilfred. 

Poems ; with an introduction by Sieg- 
fried Sassoon. 1920. 821 097 



Peirce, Katherine Milner. 

A song of faith. 1921. c811 P37 

Poem. 

Pound, Ezra Loomis. 

Quia pauper amavi. q811 P8 

RayIndranatha Thakura, Sir. 

Thought relics, by Rabindranath Ta- 
gore. 1921. 891.441 R25t 

Rhodes, Charles Elbert. 
Effective expression. cl921. 808 R47 



Rice, Cale Young. 
Sea poems. 1921. 



811 R49se 



Rittenhouse, Jessie Belle. 
The lifted cup. 1921. 811 R61I 

Shaw, Amelia. 

The pot of gold and other poems. 
1919. c811 S534 

Gift of author. 

[The Stars and stripes] 
Buddies. 81.1.08 S79b 

Poetry. 

Symons, Arthur. 

Charles Baudelaire ; a study. 1920. 

841 B33zs 
Thomas, Edward. 

Collected poems. 1920. 821 T45c 

Thorp, N. Howard. 

Songs of the cowboys. 1921. 

811 T517 
Turner, Nancy Byrd. 

Zodiac town ; the rhymes of Amos and 
Ann. cl921. 818 T94 

Untermeyer, Louis, ed. 

Modern American poetry. 1921. 

811.08 U61a 

Van Rensselaer, Mariana (Griswold) 
"Mrs Schuyler Van Rensselaer." 
Many children, with drawings by Flor- 
ence Wyman Ivins. 1921. 

811 V27 
Weaver, John V. A. 

In American — poems. 1921. 

811 W363 
Widdemer, Margaret. 

Cross-currents. 1921. 811 W63c 

Wood, Casey Albert, <.£- Garrison, Field- 
ing Hudson, eds. 
A physician's anthology of English 
and American poetry. 1920. 

821.08 W87 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



127 



Wylie, Elinor. 

Nets to catch the wind. 1921. 

811 W98 

DRAMA. 

Andeeev, Leonid Nikolaevich. 

He, the one who gets slapped. Trans- 
lated from the Russian with an in- 
troduction by G r e g o r y Zilboorg. 
1921. 891.72 A55h 

Beach, Lewis. 

Four one-act plays : The clod — A guest 
for dinner — Love among the lions — 
Brothers. cl921. 812 B36 



Brown, Alice. 
One act plays. 



1921. 



812 B877o 



Contents: The hero. — Doctor 
Auntie. — The crimson lake. — Milly 
dear. — The web. — The loving cup. — 
Joint owners in Spain. — The sugar 
house. — A March wind. 

Clark, Barrett Harper, cd. 

Representative one-act plays by Brit- 
ish and Irish authors. 1921. 

822.08 C59 
Coit, Henry Augustus 

The arbitrators. cl921. (American 
dramatists series) 812 C68 

Fitch. Clyde. 

The woman in the case. The truth. 
The city. 1919. 812 F54w 

Gale, Zona. 

Miss Lulu Bett. 1921. 812 G15m 

Galsworthy, John. 

Six short plays. 1921. 822 G17si 

Garnett, Mrs Louise (Ayres). 

The courtship. cl920. 812 G235c 

Longfellow's "Courtship of Miles 
Standish." 

Gerstenberg, Alice. 
Ten one-act plays. cl921. 812 G38 

Greene, Clay Meredith. 

John of Nepomuk, patron saint of 
Bohemia ; with a note on the music 
by the composer, Humphrey J. 
Stewart. The nineteenth grove play 
of the Bohemian club of San Fran- 
cisco. 1921. c812 G79j 

Gregory, Isabella Augusta (Persse) 
lady. 
The dragon, a wonder play in three 
acts. 1920. 822 G82d 



Gregory, Odin. 

Cains Gracchus, a tragedy. cl920. 

812 G82 
Hare, Walter Ben. 

Bran' new monologues. 1921. 

812 H27b 
Josaphake, Lionel. 

Christopher. 1921. c812 J83 

Millay. Edna St. Vincent. 

The lamp and the bell. 1921. 

812 M64 
Ollanta. 

Ollanta ; an ancient Peruvian Indian 
drama. cl920. (American drama- 
tists series) 898.2 049 

O'Neill. Eugene Gladstone. 

Gold ; a play in four acts. cl920. 

812 058g 
Overstreet, Harry Allen. 

Hearts to mend. cl920. 812 096 

Parker, Mary Moncure. 

Funny monologues and poems. 1921. 

812 P24 
Shaw, George Bernard. 

Back to Methuselah. A metabiological 
pentateuch. 1921. 822 S53b 

Stacpoole, Henry DeVere. 

The blue lagoon ; a play in four acts 
by Norman Macowan and Charlton 
Mann. [1920 J 822 S77 

Symons, Arthur. 

Cesare Borgia, Iseult of Brittany, 
The toy cart. 1920. 822 S98c 

Varesi, Gilda, & Byrne, Mrs Dolly. 
Enter madame ; a play in three acts. 
1921. 812 V29 

The Welsh embassador. 1920. (The 
Malone society reprints) 

822 M25wel 

CALIFORNIA FICTION. 

Barson, Robert Gale. 

Bill's mistake. 1921. cB282 

Bone, David William. 

The brassbounder. cl921. cB712 

Branner, John Casper. 

How and why stories. 1921. cB821 



Carpenter, Grant. 
Long sweetening. 



1921. 



C-C2951 



128 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



Dobie, Charles Caldwell. 

Broken to the plow. cl921. cD633b 



Kenyon, Camilla. 

Fortune at Bandy's Flat. cl921. 



Knibbs, Henry Herbert. 
Partners of chance. 1921. 



cK37 



cK69p 



Kyne, Peter Bernard. 

The pride of Palomar. 1921. cK99p 



Noeeis, Charles G. 
Brass. cl921. 



cN854b 



Noeeis, Mrs Kathleen (Thompson). 
The beloved woman. 1921. cN856b 



Osbotjbne, Lloyd. 
Wild justice. 1921. 



c081w 



Poetek, Mrs Gene (Stratton). 

Her father's daughter. 1921. cP845 



Bossi, Marcianus Filomeno. 
A trip to Mars. cl920. 
Gift of author. 



cR833 



[Siwclaie, Mrs Bertha (Muzzy)] 
Casey Byan. 1921. cS613c 

Thompson, Buth. 

Comrades of the desert. 1921. cT469 



cV162 



Valebga, Susan L. 
Esperanza. cl911. 

Weight, Harold Bell. 

Helen of the old house. 1921. 

cW949h 

BiOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

Foed, James Lauren. 

Forty-odd years in the literary shop. 
cl921. 920 F69 

Gobe, James Howard, comp. 

American legionnaires of France. 
[1920] 920.07 G66 

Lansing, Bobert. 

The big four and others of the Peace 
conference. 1921. 923.2 L295 

The mieeobs of Downing street. 13th 
ed. [1920] 920.042 M67 

O'Bbien, Michael Joseph. 

The McCarthys in early American 
history. 1921. 929.2 M123o 



Scott, Ernest. 

Men and thought in modern history. 

1920. 923 S42 

Wildman, Edwin. 

Famous leaders of industry. 2d series. 

1921. 920.07 W67 

BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL. 

Asquith. Asquith, Mrs Margot (Ten- 
nant) . 

Margot Asquith, an autobiography. 

[1920] 2 v. B A8431 

Aurelius Antoninus. Sedgwick, Henry 
Dwight. 
Marcus Aurelius. 1921. B A927s 

Bernstein. Bebnstein, Edouard. 

My years of exile. Trans, by Bernard 
Miall. [1921] B B531 

Bierce. Stabbet, Vincent. 

Ambrose Bierce. 1920. cB B588s 

Boh. Bob, Edward William. 

The Americanization of Edward Bok. 
1921. B B686 

Bradford. Plumb, Albert Hale. 

William Bradford of Plymouth. cl920. 

B B7991p 

Burroughs. Shaep, Dallas Lore. 
The seer of Slabsides. 1921. 

B B972s 

Child. Child, Francis James. 

A scholar's letters to a young lady. 
cl920. B C536 

Columbus. Lennes, Nels Johann & 
Phillips, Paul Chrisler. 
The story of Columbus. cl921. 

B C718I 

Goethe. Bbown, Peter Hume. 

Life of Goethe. 1920. 832.62 Bbrl 

Debs. . Le Peade, Buth, ed. 

Debs and the poets. cl920. B D288I 

Eugenie. Soissons, comte de. 

The true story of the Empress Eu- 
genie. 1921. B E87s 

Fabre. Fabee, Augustin. 

The life of Jean Henri Fabre, the en- 
tomologist. 1921. B F123f 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



129 



Garland. Garland, Hamlin. 

A daughter of the middle border. 1921. 

B G2333d 

Gregorius VII, pope. Wilmot-Buxton, 

Ethel Mary. 

The story of Hildebrand, St. Gregory 

VII. 1920. (Heroes of the church) 

B G821w 

Hamilton. Yandenberg, Arthur Hen- 
drick. 
The greatest American, Alexander 
Hamilton. 1921. B H217v 

Higginson. Higginson, Henry Lee. 
Life and letters. cl921. B H6374p 

Holland. Paget, Stephen, ed. 

Henry Scott Holland ; memoir and 
letters. 1921. B H7351p 

Hugo. Duclaux, Mme Agnes Mary 
Frances ( Robinson ) . 

Victor Hugo. 1921. (Makers of the 

nineteenth century) B H895d 

Kantalcuzen. Kastakuzen, Julia 
(Grant) kniaginia. 
My life here and there. 1921. 

B K161 

Kartini. Kartini, raden adjeng. 

Letters of a Javanese princess. Tr. 
from the original Dutch by Agnes 
Louise Symmers. 1920. B K181 

Lincoln. Hubbard, Elbert. 

Abe Lincoln and Nancy Hanks. cl920. 
B L736hu 
Lincoln. White, Charles T. 

Lincoln and prohibition. cl921. 

B L736wht 

London. London, Mrs Charmian (Kit- 
tredge). 
The book of Jack London. 1921. 2 v. 

cB L847I 

Lowell. Leonard, Louise. 

Percival Lowell ; an afterglow. cl921. 

B L916I 

Lucy. Lucy, Sir Henry William. 
The diary of a journalist. [1st ed.] 
1920. B L943 



Mohan. Taylor, Charles Carlisle. 
The life of Admiral Mahan, naval 
philosopher, rear-admiral United 
States navy. 1920. B M214t 

Moltke. Whitton, Frederick Ernest. 
Moltke. 1921. (Makers of the nine- 
teenth century) B M729w 

Morris. Glasier, John Bruce. 

William Morris and the early days of 
the socialist movement. 1921. 

B M8775g 

Panunzio. Panunzio, Constantine M. 
The soul of an immigrant. 1921. 

B P198 

Ravindranatha. Ravindranatha Thak- 
ura, Sir. 
Glimpses of Bengal. 1921. 

B R256g 

Repington. Repington, Charles a Court. 
Vestigia. 1919. B R425 

Rhodes. Williams, Basil. 

Cecil Rhodes. 1921. (Makers of the 
nineteenth century) B R476w 

Roosevelt. Gllman, Bradley. 

Roosevelt, the happy warrior. 1921. 

B R781g 

Roosevelt. Hagedorn, Hermann. 

Roosevelt in the Bad Lands. 1921. 
(Publications of the Roosevelt mem- 
orial association, i) B R781hi> 

Roosevelt. Robinson, Mrs Corinne 
(Roosevelt) . 
My brother, Theodore Roosevelt. 1921. 
B R781rob 

Roosevelt. Roosevelt, Quentin. 

Quentin Roosevelt ; a sketch with let- 
ters, ed. by Kermit Roosevelt. 1921. 
B R7811r 
Root. Root, Henry. 

Personal history and reminiscences. 
1921. cB R782 

Gift of author. 

Stevenson. Guthrie, Charles John 
Guthrie, lord. 
Robert Louis Stevenson ; some per- 
sonal recollections. 1920. B S848g 



M. T. F. My Chinese marriage. 1921. Strindoerg. Uddgren, Carl Gustaf. 

B M995 Strindberg the man. 1920. B S918u 



9—16230 



130 



news notes op calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



Taylor. Whitaker, Robert. 

One woman's worth. The story of 
Lueretia Watson Taylor. 

cB T2434w 

Tourgee. Dibble, Roy Floyd. 

Albion W. Tourgee. 1921. B T727d 

Tail. Paine, Albert Bigelow. 

In one man's life . . . Theodore N. 
Vail. 1921. B V129p 

Villiers. Villiebs, Frederic. 

Villiers ; his five decades of adventure. 
[1920] 2 v. B V753 

Warde. Warde, Frederick B. 

Fifty years of make-believe. 1920. 

B W265 

Wenttvorth. Mayo, Lawrence Shaw. 
John Wentworth, governor of New 
•Hampshire, 1767-1775. 1921. 

qB W478m 

Wilson. Lord, Frank B. & Bryan, 
James Williams, comps. 
Woodrow Wilson's administration and 
achievements. cl921. B W754Io 

Gift of William Carey Jones. 

HISTORY: GENERAL. 

Barnes, Harry Elmer. 

The social history of the western 
world, an outline syllabus. 1921. 

901 B26 

Chaster, Herbert Henry Edmund. 
The western manuscripts of the Bod- 
leian library. 1921. (Helps for 
students of history, no. 43) 

902 H48 
Ferrero, Guglielmo. 

The ruin of the ancient civilization 
and the triumph of Christianity. 
1921. 937.06 F38 

Hall, Harry Reginald Holland. 

The ancient history of the near East. 
cl920. 930 H17 

Lowry, Edward George. 

Washington close-ups. 1921. 

932.2 L92 
Martin, Edward James. 

The Emperor Julian; an essay on his 
relations with the Christian religion. 
1919. (Studies in church history) 
937.08 M37 



Miller, William. 

The Latin Orient. 1920. (Helps for 
students of history, no 37) 

902 H48 
Murray, Gilbert. 

Our great war and the great war of 
the ancient Greeks. 1920. 

938.05 M98a 
Murray, Robert Henry. 

A short guide to some manuscripts 
in the library of Trinity college, 
Dublin. 1920. (Helps for students 
of history, no. 32) 902 H48 

Pollen, John Hungerford. 

Sources for the history of Roman 
Catholics in England, Ireland and 
Scotland, from the reformation 
period to that of emancipation, 1533 
to 1795. 1921. (Helps for students 
of history, no. 39) 902 H48 

Roberts, Richard Arthur. 

The reports of the Historical mss. 
commission. 1920. (Helps for 
students of history, no. 22) 

902 H48 

EUROPE. 

American commission on conditions in 
Ireland. 
Interim report. 1921. 941.5 A51 

Booth, Cecily. 

Cosimo I, duke of Florence. 1921. 

945.5 B72 
Cammaerts, Emile. 

Belgium from the Roman invasion to 
the present day. [1921] (The 
story of the nations) 949.3 C18 

Champney, Mrs Elizabeth (Williams). 
Romance of Russia. 1921. 947 C45 

Cotton. Sir Robert Bruce, barf. 

Cottoni posthuma. 1651. 942.05 C85 

Efimenko, Aleksandra IAkovlevna 
(Stavrovskaia) 
A short history of Russia. Trans, by 
Herbert Moore. 1920. 947 E27 



Einstein, Lewis David. 
Tudor ideals. 1921. 



942.05 E35 



Farrer, William. 

An outline itinerary of King Henry 
the first. q 942.02 F2 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



131 



Gxjerard, Albert Leon. 
French civilization. 1921. 



944 G929 



McBride, Isaac. 

"Barbarous soviet Russia.'' 1920. 
947.08 M11 

Maxwell, Constantia. 

The foundations of modern Ireland. 

1921. (Texts for students, no. 27) 

941.5 M465 

Muir, Ramsay. 

Nationalism and internationalism, the 

culmination of modern history. 1919. 

940.9 M95n 

Munro, Dana Carleton. 

The middle ages, 395-1272. 192L 

940.1 M96mi 

The New Russia (a weekly review of 

Russian politics). Vols. 2-3. 1920. 

947.05 N55 

Postgate, Raymond William, cd. 

Revolution from 1789 to 190G. 1921. 

940.9 P85 
Ruhl, Arthur Brown. 

New masters of the Baltic. c!921. 

947.4 R93 
Schevill, Ferdinand. 

A political history of modern Europe 
from the reformation to the present 
day. 1921. 940.5 S32 

Strachey, Giles Lytton. 
Queen Victoria. 1921. 



942.08 S89 



Terry, Charles Sanford. 

A history of Scotland from the Roman 
evacuation to the disruption, 1843. 
1920. 941 T32h 

Turner, Edward Raymond. 

Europe since 1870. 1921. 940.9 T94 

Wilson, Philip Whitwell. 

The Irish case. cl920. 941.5 W75i 

ASIA. 

Brinkley, Frank, & Kikuchi, Dairoku. 

A history of the Japanese people from 

the earliest times to the end of the 

Meiji era. cl915. 952 B85 

Graves, Joseph Waddington.. 

The renaissance of Korea. cl920. 

951.9 G77 
Kuno, Voshi S. 

What Japan wants. cl921. 952 K961 



Reid, Gilbert. 

China, captive or free? A study of 
China's entanglements. 1921. 

951 R35 

UNITED STATES. 

Beardsley, Frank Grenville. 

The builders of a nation, a history of 
the Pilgrim fathers. cl921. 

974.4 B36 
Bolton, Herbert Eugene, ed. 

Athanase de Mezieres and the Louis- 
iana - Texas frontier, 1768 - 1780. 
1914. 2 v. (Spain in the West) 
976.3 B69 

The Spanish borderlands. 1921. 

(Chronicles of America, v. 23) 

973 C55 

Eekhof, A. 

Three unknown documents concerning 

the Pilgrim fathers in Holland. 

1920. 974.4 E36 

Farrand, Max. 
The fathers of the Constitution. 1921. 
(Chronicles of America, v. 13) 

973 C55 
Feasey, J. Eaton. 
The Mayflower pioneers. 974.4 F28 

Forbes, Allan. 

Towns of New England and old Eng- 
land, Ireland and Scotland. 1921. 
2 v. q 974 F6 

Hawoeth, Paul Leland. 

Trailmakers of the Northwest. 1921. 
971.2 H39 

Howe, Mark Anthony De Wolfe. 
Boston common. 1921. 974.41 B74h 

Johnson, Allen. 

Jefferson and his colleagues. 1921. 
(Chronicles of America, v. 15) 

973 C55 
Morton, Oren Frederic. 

A history of Monroe county, West 
Virginia. 1916. 975.41 M89m 

A history of Pendleton county, 

West Virginia. cl910. 

975.41 P39m 

O'Shaughnessy, Mrs Edith Louise 
(Coues). 

Intimate pages of Mexican history. 
cl920. 972 053 



132 



news notes of California libearies. [January, 1922 



Paxon, Frederic Logan. 

Recent history of the United States. 
cl921. 973 P34r 

Seymotjb, Charles. 

Woodrow Wilson and the world war. 
1921. (Chronicles of America, v. 
48) 973 C55 

Slosson, Edwin Emery. 

The American spirit in education. 
1921. (Chronicles of America, v. 
33) 973 C55 

Stephenson, Nathaniel Wright. 

Texas and the Mexican war. 1921. 
(Chronicles of America, v. 24) 

973 C55 

Thompson, Holland. 

The age of invention. 1921. (Chron- 
icles of America, v. 37) 973 C55 

Wood, William Charles Henry. 

Captains of the civil war. 1921. 
(Chronicles of America, v. 31) 

973 C55 

Wrong, George McKinnon. 

Washington and his comrades in arms. 
1921. (Chronicles of America, v. 
12) . 973 C55 

EUROPEAN WAR. 

Abbot, Willis John. 

Blue jackets of 1918. 1921. 

940.934 A12 

Adams, Ephraim Douglass. 

The Hoover war collection at Stan- 
ford university. c940.91 A21 

Evans, James William, & Harding, 

Gardner Ludwig. 

Entertaining the American army ; tht 

American stage and lyceum in the 

world war. 1921. 940.937 E92 

Gill, Charles Clifford. 

What happened at Jutland. 1921. 

940.934 G47w 

Hued, Archibald Spicer. 

The merchant navy. 1921. (History 
of the great war based on official 
documents, by direction of the His- 
torical section of the Committee of 
imperial defence) 940.934 H95 



Jones, Rufus Matthew. 

A service of love in war time ; Ameri- 
can Friends relief work in Europe, 
1917-1919. 1920. 940.937 J78 

Kittkedge, Tracy Barrett. 

Naval lessons of the great war, a re- 
view of the Senate naval investiga- 
tion of the criticisms by Admiral 
Sims of the policies and methods of 
Josephus Daniels. 1921. 

940.934 K62 

Newbolt, Sir Henry John. 

A naval history of the war, 1914-1918. 
2d ed. 940.934 N53 

Preston, Richard Martin Peter. 
The Desert mounted corps. 1921. 

940.9421 P93 

Young, Filson. 

With Beatty in the North Sea. 1921. 
940.934 Y71 

GEOGRAPHY AND TRAVEL. 

Branom, Mendel Everett & Branom, 
Fred Kenneth. 
The teaching of geography. 1921. 

910.7 B82 

Paine, Ralph Delahaye. 

Lost ships and lonely seas. 1921. 

910.4 P14! 
Stock, Ralph. 

The cruise of the dream ship. 1921. 

910.4 S86 
Smith, Edward Ehrlich. 

Teaching geography by problems. 
1921. 910.7 S64 

Pyle, Howard. 

Howard Pyle's Book of pirates. 1921. 

q910.4 P9 
Rand, McNally & co. 

Commercial atlas of foreign countries, 
a companion volume to the Com- 
mercial atlas of America. 2d ed. 
1921. f912 H1co 

EUROPE. 

Boucher, Frangois & Huarrl, Mme. 
Frances (Wilson), ed. and trans. 
American footprints in Paris. cl921. 
914.43 B75 
Burke, Thomas. 

The outer circle ; rambles in remote 
London. 1921. 914.21 B95ou 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



133 



Casey, Robert J. 

The land of haunted castles. 1921. 

q914.93 C3 
George, Walter Lionel. 

A London mosaic. cl921. 914.21 G34 

The glass of fashion ; some social re- 
flections by a gentleman with a 
duster. 1921. 914.2 G54 

Marshall, Archibald. 

A spring walk in Provence. 1920. 

914.49 M36 

Moss, James Alfred & Howland, H. S. 

Chateau-Thierry, an American shrine. 

cl920. 914.43 M91 

Paine, Albert Bigelow. 

The car that went abroad. cl920. 

914.4 P14 
Salaman, Malcolm Charles. 

Londoners, then and now. [1920] 

q914.21 S1I 
Trend, A. J. B. 

A picture of modern Spain. 1921. 

914.6 T79 

AFRICA. 

JOELSON, F. S. 

The Tanganyika Territory ( formerly 
German Bast Africa), characteris- 
tics and potentialities. 1921. 

916.7 J64 
Marcosson, Isaac Frederick. 

An African adventure. 1921. 

916.7 M32 
O'Neil, Owen Rowe. 

Adventures in Swaziland. 1921. 

916.8 058 

ASIA. 

Andrews, Roy Chapman. 

Across Mongolian plains ; a natural- 
ist's account of China's "great 
northwest". 1921. 915.1 A56ac 

Chauvelot, Robert. 

Mysterious India. Trans, by Eleanor 
Stimson Brooks. 1921. 915.4 C51 

Couchoud, Paul Louis. 

Japanese impressions. Trans, from the 
French ... by Frances Rumsey. 
1921. 915.2 C85 

Grant, Elihu. 

The people of Palestine. cl921. 

915.69 G76 



Hosie, Sir Alexander. 

On the trail of the opium poppy. 
[1914] 2 v. 915.1 H82 

Jacques, John Godfrey & Wellman, 
Adelaide D. 
Escape from Siberian exile. 1921. 

c915.7 J 19 

Kinglake, Alexander William. 

Eothen. 1913. q913.6 K5 

Newell, Herbert Andrews. 

Topee and turban ; or, Here and there 
in India. 1921. 915.4 N54 

UNITED STATES. 

The Associated tours guide, 8th season, 
1921. q917.3 A8 

Cameron, Mrs Charlotte. 

A cheechako in Alaska and Yukon. 
[1920] 917.98 C18 

Chase, Joseph Smeaton. 

Our Araby. 1920. c917.9495 C48 

Curran, William Tees. 

In Canada's wonderful northland. 

1920. 917.14 C97 

Dixon, Winifred Hawkridge. 

Westward hoboes. 1921. 917.8 D62 

Donaldson, Alfred Lee. 

A history of the Adirondacks. 1921. 
2 v. 917.47 D67 

Evarts, Hal George. 

The passing of the old West. 1921. 

917.8 E92 
Freeman, Lewis R. 

Down the Columbia. 1921. 

917.95 F85 

George, Walter Lionel. 

Hail Columbia ! Random impressions 
of a conservative English radical. 

1921. 917.3 G34 

Hall, Ansel F. ed. 

Handbook of Yosemite national park ; 
a compendium of articles on the 
Yosemite region by the leading 
scientific authorities. 1921. 

c91 7.9447 H17h 

Harding, Warren Gamaliel. 
Our common country. cl921. 

917.3 H263 



134 



news notes op California libraries. [January, 1922 



Hebgeshbimeb, Joseph. 

San Cristobel de la Habana. 1920. 

917.291 H54 
Maecus, Peter. 

New York, the nation's metropolis. 
cl921. 917.471 M32 

Obee, Frederick Albion. 

A guide to the West Indies, Bermuda 
and Panama. 3d rev. ed. 1920. 

917.29 012g 

Pabkinson, Jessie Heaton. 

Adventuring in California, yesterday, 
today, and day before yesterday. 
1921. C917.94 P24 

Pullinger, Herbert, illus. 

Washington ; the nation's capital, 
twenty-five drawings. cl921. 

917.53 P98 
Tuckeb, Joseph Clarence. 

To the golden goal and other sketches. 
1895. C917.94 T89 

Gift of the Trustees of the Mar- 
guerite Home. 

PACIFIC ISLES. 

Bligh, William. 

Captain Bligh's second voyage to the 
South Sea, by Ida Lee (Mrs 
Charles Bruce Marriott). 1920. 

919 B64 
Hall, James Norman. 

Faery lands of the South seas. 1921. 

919.6 H17 
Keoebee, Alfred Louis. 

Peoples of the Philippines. 1919: 
(American museum of natural his- 
tory) 919.14 K93 

Monckton, Charles Arthur Whitmore. 
Taming New Guinea ; some experiences 
of a New Guinea resident magis- 
trate. 1921. 919.5 M73 

St. Johnston, Thomas Reginald. 

The islanders of the Pacific ; or, The 
children of the sun. 1921. 

919.6 S14 

HUNGARIAN LIST. 

Almasi, Tihamer. 

Czigany panna. Nepszinmii harom fel- 
vonasban. 1884? 894.52 A44 

Abany, Janos. 

Kisebb koltemenyei. Teljes gyiijte- 
meny. 1894. 2 v. 894.51 A66 



Miivei. 
1. 



Uj kiadas hat kototben. 
894.51 A66m 



Contents: E!16szo. Toldi. Toldi 
szerelme. — Toldi esteje. 



BArsony Istvan. 
Negyszem kozt. 



Trefas tortenetek. 



894.53 B28 

1905. 
894.53 B28t 



Benedek, Elek. 

A Magyar nepkoltes gyongyei. 1909. 

894.51 B46 

Beothy, Laszlo. 

Beni Bacsi. 1897. 894.52 B48b 

— ■ A harom Kazmer. Enekes boho- 



sag 3 felvonasban. 1896. 

894.52 B48 

Kovacsne. Bohosag harom fel- 
vonasban. 1903. 894.52 B48k 

Beeczik, Arpad. 

Himfy dalai. Vigjatek harom felvon- 
asban egy elojatekkal. 

894.52 B486h 



— Mai divat. Vigjatek harom fel- 
vonasban. 1899. 894.52 B486m 



— Nezd meg az anyjat Vigjat6k 
harom felvonasban. Masodik kiadas. 
1903. 894.52 B486n 



A papa. Vigjatek harom felvon- 
asban. 1896. 894.52 B846p 



— - A proctectio. Bredeti vigjatek 
harom felvonasban. 1888. 

894.52 B486 

A veteranok. Eletkep a fovar- 

osi eletbol harom felvonasban, dal- 
okkal. 1892. 894.52 B486v 



Bibo. Lajos. 

A diadalmas asszony. 



1910. 



894.53 B61 



Bbody, Sandor. 
Apro regenyek. 
ytar) 

Arva leanyok. 



( Egyetemes regen- 
894.53 B86ap 

894.53 B86 



— A ketlelku asszony. Uj Kiadas. 
1918. 894.53 B86k 



Nyomor. 



(Egyetemes regenytar) 
894.53 B86n 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



135 



Szineszver. 



894.53 B86s 



Csiky, Gergely. 

A nagymama. Vigjatek haroni fel- 
vonasban. 1913. 894.52 C95 

A nagyratermett. Vigjatek harom 
. felvonasban. 1891. 894.52 C95n 

Doczi, Lajos. 

Csok. Vigjatek negy felvonasban. 
(Doczi Lajos munkai. 1. kotet) 

894.52 D63c 



— - Ellinor. Vigjatek harom felvon- 
asban. 1897. 894.52 D63e 



Koltemenyei. 1890. 



894.51 D63k 



Vegyes Parok. Szinmii. 1SS9. 

894.52 D63 
Eotvos, Jozsef. 

A falu jegyzoje. 1911. 2 v. 

894.53 E62f 

A Karthausi. 1919. 894.53 E62 



— • Koltemenyek szinmuvek. 1903. 
(Osszes munkai xviii) 894.51 E62k 

— A noverek. 1905. 894.53 E62n 



Fai, Andras. 

— • A Bor. Falusi tortenet 3 felvon- 

ban. 1884. 894.52 F15k 

A Matrai Vadaszat. Vigjatek 



harom felvonasban. 1886. 

894.52 F15 
Gaal, Jozsef. 

A Peleskei notarius. Bokozat harom 
szakaszban negy felvonassal. 1915. 
894.52 G11 

Gaedonyi, Geza. 

Annnska. Vigjatek harom felvonasban. 
894.52 G22an 



A Bor. Falusi tortenet 3 felvon- 
asban. 894.52 G22b 

— Gore Martsa lakodalma. Irtam 
en magam Gore Gabor. [1920] 

894.53 G22g 

— Veszodelmek, mas szoval Nem 



matska ugras ide Amerika se. 

894.53 G22 
Gtulai, Pal. 

Koltemenyei. Hatodik bovitett kiadas. 
1904. 2 v 894.51 G99 



— • Vazlatok es kepek. bovitett kiad. 
1913. . 894.53 G99 



Herczeg, Ferencz. 
Andor es Andras. 
Ferenc munkai ) 



1911. (Herczeg 
894.53 H53an 



— Bizanc ; szinmii harom felvonas- 
ban. 1911. 894.52 H53b 



Az elso vihar. 

felvonasban. 1903. 
enc munkai) ■ 

A Gyurkovics-fiuk 



Szinmii negy 
( Herczeg Fer- 

894.52 H53 

1914. 
894.53 H53 

A Gyurkovics-lanyok. 1920. 

894.53 H53g 

A harom testor. 1910. (Herc- 
zeg Ferenc munkai) 894.52 H53h 

■ Ocskay brigaderos. Tortenelmi 

szinmii negy felvonasban. 1909. 
(Herczeg Ferenc munkai) 

894.52 H53o 
Jakab, Odon. 

Komediak (Elbeszelesek) . [1898], 

894.53 J 25 
Jokai, Mor. 

Az arany ember. Revai-kiad. 2 v. 

894.53 J 74 



— Egy Magyar nabob. 13 kiad. 
1911. 894.53 J74eg 



Erdely aranykora. 



894.53 J74e 



A gazdag szegenyek. 1913. (Jo- 
kai Mor osszes miivei. Nemzeti 
kiad. 79 kotet) 894.53 J74g 



Karpathy Zoltan. 1911. 

894.53 J74k 



A koszivu ember fiai. Tizenne- 

gyedik kiadas. 1912-1914. 3 v. in 
1. 894.53 J74ko 

Nevtelen v&r. 1913. 



894.53 J74n 

Politikai divatok. 1913. 

894.53 J74p 

Szegeny gazdagok. 1910. 

894.53 J 74s 

Szep Mikhal. Revai-kiadas. 

894.53 J74sz 



136 



news notes oe California libraries. [January, 1922 



Szinmiivek. Hatodik k i a d a s . 

1911-1913. 3 v. 894.52 J74 



A tengerszemii holgy. R6vai 

kiad. 894.53 J74te 



- — ■ Torok vilag Magyarorszagon. 
1914. 894.53 J74t 



Az uj foldesur. 1916-1918. 2 v. 

in 1. 894.53 J74u 



Josika, Miklos, bar6. 
Abafi. 1915. 



894.53 J83ab 



A csehek Magyarorszagban. 1908. 

894.53 J83 
Kemeny, Zsigmond. 

Gyulai Pal. 1914. (Baro Kemeny 
Zsigmond osszes muvei. 1st kotet) 
894.53 K31g 

A rajongok. 1913. 894.53 K31r 



— Zord ido. 1910. (Baro Kemeny 

Zsigmond osszes miivei. 8th kotet) 

894.53 K31 



Kenedy, Geza. 

Szenrajzok. 1894. 



894.53 K33 



Kisfaludy, Karoly. 

A kerok. Vigjatek harom felvonas- 
ban. 894.52 K61 



: — A partiitok. Vigjatek harom 

felvonasban. 1917. 

894.52 K61p 
Kiss, Jozsef. 

Osszes koltemenyei. Olcso kiad. 1914. 
894.51 K61 
Kobok, Tamas. 

O akarta. Kis regenyek. 894.53 K75 

■ Ki a ghettobol. 1911. 2 v. 

894.53 K75k 
L£;vai, Joszef. 

Osszes koltemenyei. 1881. 2 v. 

894.51 L65 
Madach, Imre. 

Az ember tragediaja ; dramai koltem- 
eny. 894.52 M17 

Mikszath, Kalman. 
A jo palocok. 



894.53 M68 



Uj Zrinyiasz. [1914] 

894.53 M68u 
Makai, Emil. 

Munkai. Sajto ala rendezte Molnar 
Geza. 2 v. 894.51 M23 



Moricz, Zsigmond. 
Harmatos Rozsa. 



894.53 M85 



Petofi, Sandor. 

Osszes koltemenyei. Uj nepies es 
ifjusagi teljes kiadas egy kotetben. 
1916. 894.51 P49 

Rado, Antal, comp. 

Unjabb nemzeti dalkonyvecske. 

894.51 R13 

Rakosi, Jeno. 

A barone levelei. Bohosag harom fel- 
vonasban. 1903. 894.52 R16b 



— A bolond. 
asban. 1903. 



Mese harom felvon- 
894.52 R16bo 



— Budavar megvetele. Nepszinmii 
harom felvonasban. 1902. 

894.52 R16bu 

- — Ejjel az erdon. Parasztvigja- 
tek harom felvonasban. 1903. 

894.52 R16e 



Ezopusz. 

ban. 1903. 



Vigjatek ot felvonas- 
894.52 R16ez 



Heten Teba ellen. Aiszkylosz 

tragediaja. 1903. 894.52 R16h 

— Ida. Vigjatek negy felvonasban. 
1903. 894.52 R16i 

— Istvan vezer (Kiralynek harca). 
1902. 894.52 R16is 

Magdolna. Paraszttragedia 6t 

felvonasban. 1903. 894.52 R16m 



- — A negy kiraly. Dalosjatek 
harom felvonasban. 1903. 

894.52 R16n 



— Otodik Laszlo. Szomorujatek 6t 
felvonasban. 1902. 894.52 R16o 



— Szelhaziak. Enekes es tancos 
bohosag harom felvonasban. 1903. 

894.52 R16s 

A szent korona varazsa. Szinmii 

harom felvonasban. 1902. 

894.52 R16 



A szerelem iskolaja. Szinmii 6t 

felvonasban. 1903. 894.52 R16sze 



Szinre szint. 

asban. 1902. 



Szinmii ot felvon- 
894.52 R16sz 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



137 



Tempefoi. Operett harom fel- 

vonasban. 1903. 894.52 R16t 

Vilagszep asszony Marcia. Dal- 

osjatek harom felvonasban. 1903. 

894.52 R16v 

Rakosi, Viktor. 

Sipulusz humoros elbeszelesei. 1913- 
1914. 4 v. 894.53 R16 



Szasz, Karoly. 

Kisebb koltemenyei. 



1883. 2 v. 

894.51 S99 



Szatmary, Joseph. 

Szokott katona. Eredeti szinmu 3 
szakaszban. 894.52 S99 

Szomahazy, Istvan. 

Az elvalt asszony. 1915. (A nagy 
szlnjatek, irta Szomhazy Istvan) 

894.53 S99 



TOth, Ede. 
A falu rossza. 
vonasban. 



Nepszinmii haroni fel- 
894.52 T71f 



• A toloncz. Nepszinmii harom fel- 
vonasban. 894.52 T71 

CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING OCTO- 
BER, NOVEMBER AND DECEM- 
BER, 1921.f 

Many of the administrative departments 
of the state are from time to time pub- 
lishing reports, bulletins, etc., which are 
of considerable interest. Copies can 
usually be obtained free by writing to the 
departments issuing them. The publica- 
tions of , the University of California are 
offered for sale or in exchange by the 
University Press, Berkeley, with the 
exception of the publications of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station and some of 
the administrative bulletins, which are 
distributed free. Most of the publications 
of the State Mining Bureau are required 
by law to be sold. Price is given after 
each entry. The titles are listed in News 
Notes of California Libraries as they are 
received at the State Library. 



tExcept when otherwise noted publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
office, Sacramento, and are octavo in size. 



Adjutant General. Honor roll, 
names of officers and enlisted men from 
California who lost • their lives while 
serving in the armed forces of the 
United States during the world war. 
1921. 26 p. 

Agriculture, State Boaed of. Statis- 
tical report for the year 1920. 1921. 
375 p. maps, illus. 

Agricultube, Department of. 
Monthly bulletin, vol. 10, no. 7, July, 
1921. p. 217-305. illus. 

Proceeding's of the Third conven- 
tion Western Plant Quarantine Board, 
Victoria, British Columbia, June 7 to 
10, 1921. 

Same, vol. 10, no. 8, August, 



1921. p. 306-35. illus. 

Same, vol. 10, no. 9, Septem- 
ber, 1921, p. 336-85. illus. 

Special publication no. 4. Re- 



port of Stallion Registration for the fis- 
cal year ending June 30, 1920. 1921. 
34 p. 

Status of California grape in- 
dustry, by R. L. Nougaret. Report no. 
2. August 15, 1921. 40 p. 

Banking Department, State (San 
Francisco) .* Introductory letter of the 
Superintendent of Banks [Twelfth an- 
nual report] 1921. 45 p. 

Building and Loan Commissioner 
(San Francisco). Annual report on 
building and loan associations. Septem- 
ber 15, 1921. 1921. 119 p. 

Charities and Corrections, State 
Board of (San Francisco). Monthly 
census of inmates of state institutions. 
Bulletins, nos. 214-215, October-Novem- 
ber, 1921. 

Mimeographed sheets. 

Education, State Board of. Bul- 
letin no. 10-P. E. Amended regulations 
governing course of study for the train- 
ing of teachers of physical education. 
December, 1921. 1921. 7 p. 



*The location of an office or institution 
is in Sacramento, except when otherwise 
noted. 



138 



news notes op calipornia libraries. [January, 1922 



Fish and Game Commission (San 

Francisco). California fish and game, 

vol. 7, no. 4, October, 1921. 1921. p. 

190-286. illus. 

Sardine number. 

Index to vol. 7, p. 274-86. 

Health, State Board of. Monthly 

bulletin, vol. 17, no. 2, August,. 1921. 

1921. p. 75-112. illus. 

"World's cleanest ferry boats ; Vi- 
tality of race stocks. 

— Same, vol. 17, no. 3, Septem- 
ber, 1921. 1921. p. 113-54. illus. 

Sanitation of automobile camps ; 
Institute for administrators and in- 
structors of schools of nursing. 

■ Special bulletin no. 40. Some 

considerations relating to the collection 
and disposal of city refuse. 1921. 22 p. 
illus. 



Bureau of Registration of 

Nurses. Requirements and courses of 
instruction for accredited schools of nurs- 
ing. 1921. 16 p. 



California Historical Survey Com- 
mission (Berkeley). The architectural 
history of Mission San Carlos Borromeo, 
by Frances Rand Smith. 1921. 81 p. 
illus. 4°. 

Immigration and Housing, Commis- 
sion of (San Francisco). Advisory 
pamphlet on camp sanitation and hous- 
ing. (Revised, 1921). 1921. 82 p. 
illus. 

Industrial Accident Commission. 
(San Francisco). Report from July 1, 

1920, to June 30, 1921. 1921. 127 p. 

California safety news, vol. 5, 

nos. 9-12, September-December, 1921. 

1921. illus. 

Reported decisions, vol. 7, no. 



15, 1921. 



Subscription $2.00 a year; single 
copies 25 cents. 

Boiler safety bulletin. 1921. 



40 p. illus. 



General construction safety or- 
ders relating .to the storage and use of 
explosives. Effective January 15, 1918. 
1921. 20 p. 16°. 



— — — General safety orders. Effec- 
tive January 1, 1916. 1921. 10 p. 

Quarry safety rules. Effective 



January 1, 1919. 1921. 57 p. 16°. 

Library, State. News Notes of Cali- 
fornia Libraries, vol. 16, no. 4, October, 
1921. p. 351-864. 

California county free library 



law. Fourth edition. 1921. 22 p. 32°. 
Circular of information for 



applicants for certificates of qualification 
to hold the office of. county librarian in 
California. [Board of Library Examin- 
ers] 1921. 12 p. 24°. 

Library laws of the state of 



California, 1921 supplement. 1921. 37 p. 



Summary of county free li- 



brary laws in the United States. (From 
News Notes of California Libraries, vol. 
17, no. 1, January, 1922). 15 p. 

Books for the blind depart- 



ment. Reprinted from News Notes of 
California Libraries, October, 1921. 39 p. 

32°. 

Medical Examiners, State Board of. 
Supplement to the 1921 directory of phy- 
sicians and surgeons, osteopaths, drug- 
less practitioners, naturopaths, chiropo- 
dists and midwives holding certificates 
issued under the Medical Practice acts 
of California. August 1, 1921. 1921. 
28 p. 

Mining Bureau, State (San Fran- 
cisco). Report XVII of the State Min- 
eralogist : Mining in California during 
1920. 1921. 562 p. maps, illus. 

Bulletin no. 90. California 



mineral production for 1920 with county 
maps. 1921. 218 p. maps, illus. 

Summary of operations Cali- 



fornia oil fields, monthly chapter, seventh 
annual report of the State Oil and Gas 
Supervisor, vol. 7, nos. 1-4, July to 
October, 1921. 1921. illus. 

Prison, State (San Quentin). The 
bulletin, vol. 9, nos. 1-3, October-Decem- 
ber, 1921. 

A monthly journal devoted to in- 
mate welfare. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



139 



Public Instruction, Superintend- 
ent of. School law of California, 1921.. 
1921. 500 p. 

Eailroad Commission (San Fran- 
cisco). Decisions. Vol. 19, November 1, 
1920 to May 31, 1921. 1921. 1032 p. 

Cover title: Opinions and orders of 
the Railroad Commission of Califor- 
nia. 

Public utilities act of the state 



of California and constitutional provi- 
sions and other enactments relating to 
public utilities. [1921] 77 p. 

Uniform classification of ac- 



counts for class A : Automotive trans- 
portation companies. Effective January 
1, 1922. 1921. 38 p. 

Secretary op State. Eoster of state, 
county, city and township officials, state 
of California also federal officials for 
California, December 1, 1921. 1921. 
166 p. illus. 

Treasurer, State. Biennial report 
for the seventieth and seventy-first fiscal 
years, July 1, 1918, to June 30, 1920. 
1920. 99 p. 

University of California (Berke- 
ley). Calendar, vol. LV, nos. 9-17, 
October 1 to November 26, 1921. 8 p. 

folders. 

Published weekly during the acad- 
emic year and summer session. Price 
for regular session 50 cents per 
year; 25 cents per half-year; for sum- 
mer session 25 cents postpaid. 

Chronicle : an official record, 

vol. XXIII, no. 4, October, 1921. p. 

361-464. 

Contents: Poems by Pastonchi, 
Anne Goodwin Winslow ; The Intel- 
lectual interests of undergraduates, 
John S. P. Tatlock ; The Principal of 
rapid peering in birds, Joseph Grin- 
ned ; Greek and Gael go voyaging, 
Grace L. McCann ; Freedom, David P. 
Barrows ; The Dredger, Laura Bell 
Everett ; The "Nemesis of mediocrity", 
Chas. B. Lipman ; The Student and 
the scholar, Regis Michaud ; Fresh- 
man English and a career open to 
the talents, Harold Bruce ; An Ad- 
venturer in the literature of success, 
H. C. Brown ; Phrontistery. 



Record, vol. 1, no. 4. Berke- 
ley, October, 1921. p. 63-75. roy 8°. 



Publications. Agricultural Sci- 
ences, vol. 4, no. 9. The alinefnent chart 
method of preparing tree volume tables, 
by Donald Bruce. Berkeley, December 
20, 1921. p. 233-43, 3 text figures, roy 
8°. 

Price 20 cents. 

: College of Agriculture. 



Agricultural Experiment station. Bul- 
letin no. 331. Phylloxera - resistant 
stocks, by Frederic T. Bioletti, F. C. H. 
Flossfeder and A. E. Way. Berkeley, 
October, 1921. p. 79-139. illus. 

1 Same, no. 332. Wal- 
nut culture in California, by L. D. 
Batchelor. Berkeley, June, 1921. p. 
140-218. illus. 



— Same, no. 333. Some 

factors affecting the quality of ripe 
olives sterilized at high temperature, by 
W. V. Cruess. Berkeley, October, 1921. 
p. 219-33. illus. . 

Same, no. 334. Pre- 



liminary volume tables for second-growth 
redwood, by Donald Bruce. Berkeley, 
October, 1921. p. 234-39. 

Same, no. 335. Cocoa- 



nut meal as a feed for dairy cows and 
other livestock, by F. W. Woll. Berke- 
ley, November, 1921. p. 240-58. 

' Same, no. 336. The 



preparation of nicotine dust as an insect- 
icide, by Ralph E. Smith. Berkeley, 
November, 1921. p. 259-74. 

Same, no. 337. Some 



factors of dehydrater efficiency, by W. V. 
Cruess and A. W. Christie. Berkeley, 
November, 1921. p. 275-98. illus. 

■ Same, no. 338. Selec- 



tion and treatment of waters for spray- 
ing purposes with especial reference to 
Santa Clara Valley, by E. R. DeOng. 
Berkeley, December, 1921. p. 299-314.. 
illus. 

: Circular no. 227. Plant 



disease and pest control, by W. T. Home 
and E. O. Essig. Berkeley, June, 1921. 
69 p. 



140 



news notes of California libraries. [January, 1922 



' — Same, no. 228. Vine- 
yard irrigation in arid climates, by Fred- 
erick T. Bioletti. Berkeley, June, 1921. 
4 p. 

Same, no. 229. Cordon 



Pruning, by Frederick Bioletti. Berke- 
ley, November, 1921. 14 p. 

■ Same, no. 230. Test- 



ing milk, cream, and skim milk for 
butterfat, by J. C. Marquardt. Berke- 
ley, [1921] 11 p. 

Same, no. 231. The 



home vineyard, by L. O. Bonnet. Berke- 
ley, December, 1921. 12 p. illus. 

Anatomy, vol. 1. no. 1. 



Vital staining of human blood with 
special reference to the separation of the 
monocytes, by Miriam E. Simpson, p. 
1-9 ; vol. 1, no. 2. The experimental 
production of circulating endothelial mac- 
rophages and the relation of these cells 
to monocytes, by Miriam E. Simpson. 
p. 11-19. December, 1921. roy 8°. 

' Astronomy. Lick Ob- 



servatory Bulletin, no. 333. The physi- 
cal members of the Pleiades group. 
Berkeley, December 13, 1921. p. 110- 
19. illus. 4°. 

Price $2.50 per vol. in advance. 
Vol. 10 current. 



— : Botany, vol. 9. A re- 
port upon the boreal flora of the Sierra 
Nevada of California, by Frank Jason 
Smiley. Berkeley, 1921. 416 p. illus. 
roy 8°. 

Price $5.00. 

■ — Classical Philology, 



vol. 5, no. 9. Lucretius and Cicero's 
verse, by William A. Merrill. Berke- 
ley, November 17, 1921. p. 143-54. roy 

8°. 

Price 15 cents. 



Same, vol. 5, no. 10. 

Notes on the Silvae of Statius, book no. 
5, by William A. Merrill. Berkeley, De- 
cember 20, 1921. p. 155-82. roy S°. 

Price 35 cents. 



Geology, vol. 12, no. 5. 

Extinct vertebrate faunas of the bad- 
lands of Bautista Creek and San Timo- 
teo Canon, Southern California, by 
Childs Frick. Berkeley, December 28, 
1921. p. 277-424. illus. roy 8°. 
Price $2.25. 

Same, vol. 13, no. 1. 

Lower and middle Cambrian formation 
of the Mohave Desert, by Clifton W. 
Clark. Berkeley, December 20, 1921. 
p. 1-7. 

Price 15 cents. 

Same, vol. 13, no. 2. 



Notes on peccary remains from Rancho 
La Brea, by John C. Merriam and 
Chester Stock, p. 9-17; vol. 13, no. 3. 
Notes on an Hipparion tooth from the 
Siestan deposits of the Berkeley Hills, 
California, by Chester Stock, p. 19-21. 
illus. 

Price 20 cents. 

History, vol. 11. Offi- 



cial explorations for Pacific railroads, by 
George Leslie Albright. Berkeley, 1921. 
169 p. roy 8°. 

Price $1.50. 

1 Same, vol. 12. History 



of the San Francisco Committee of Vigil- 
ance of 1851, by Mary Floyd Williams, 
Ph.D. Berkeley, 1921. 543 p. roy 8°. 
Price $5.00. 

Physiology, vol. 5, no. 

13. Some remarks on catalase, by Theo. 
C. Burnett. Berkeley, November 5, 1921. 
p. 167-170. roy 8°. 
Price 10 cents. 

' Seismographic Sta- 
tions, vol. 2, no. 1. The registration 
of earthquakes at the Berkeley station 
and at the Lick Observatory station 
from October 1, 1920, to March 31, 1921, 
by Lewis A. Bond. Berkeley, November 
18, 1921. p. 1-15. 4°. 

■ Zoology, vol. 21, no. 5. 

A study of the California jumping mice 
of the genus Zapus, by A. Brazier 
Howell. Berkeley, May 20, 1920. p. 
225-38. roy 8°. 

Price 15 cents. 



vol. 17, no. 1] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



141 



Same, vol. 21, no. 6. 

Two new rodents, genera Thomomys 
and Marmota) from the eastern bordei 
of California, by Joseph Grinnell. Berke- 
ley, November, 1921. p. 239-44. roy 8°. 
Price 15 cents. 

Whittier State School. Journal of 

delinquency, vol. 6. no. 5, September, 

1921. p. 471-527. 4°. 

Published bi-monthly. Subscrip- 
tion $1.25 per year, single copies 30 
cents. 

The Sentinel (new series) vol. 



17, nos. 1^4, October-December, 1921. 

Published bi-weekly by the Whittier 
State School. Price $1.00 per year; 
2 cents per copy. 



CALIFORNIA CITY PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED DURING OCTOBER, 
NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER, 

1921. 

Alameda. City council. Alameda 
municipal quarterly, vol. 1, no. 11, De- 
cember, 1921. 

Berkeley. Public library. Bulletin, 
vol. 5, nos. 10-12, October-December, 
1921. 

Los Angeles. Public library. Books 
for children . . . children's book week, 
November 13th to 19th, 1921. 



Chamber of commerce. Bul- 
letin, vol. 7, nos. 9-10, September-Octo- 
ber, 1921. 

Oakland. Health department. Month- 
ly bulletin, vol. 8, nos. 7-8, July-August, 
1921. 

Richmond. Health department. 
Monthly report, September - December, 
1921. 

Public library. Bulletin, vol. 

S, nos. 2-5, September-November, 1921. 

Sacramento. Health department. 
Statement of vital statistics for the 
months of September-November, 1921. 

San Diego. Health department. 
Monthly report, September-October, 1921. 

San Francicso. Board of supervis- 
ors. Journal of proceedings, vol. 16, nos. 
29-51, July-December, 1921. 

Municipal record, vol. 14, nos. 

39-52, September-December, 1921. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND ADDED 

DURING OCTOBER, NOVEMBER 

AND DECEMBER. 

Additions for above months will be 
listed in News Notes of California Li- 
braries, April, 1922. 



-22 1700 



Vol.17, No. 2 APRIL 1922 



N ews Notes 



of 



California Libraries 



IN THIS NUMBER— SOME OF THE ITEMS OF INTEREST. 



SAN DIEGO PUBLIC LIBRARY COLLECTS OVERDUES. 

MORE BUILDING SPACE FOR BERKELEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

PASADENA— GIFT TO CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARY. 

STANFORD UNIVERSITY— HOOVER WAR LIBRARY. 

OPENING OF ADDITION TO RIVERSIDE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, see Contents. 



California State Library 



CALIFORNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 

SACRAMENTO. 1922 
18268 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

I BELIEVE 143 

NOTES FROM HAWAII 1 145 

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 146 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 147 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS 148 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST 180 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 1 186 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS 191 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 193 

Staff, Etc 193 

Depaetments 194 

Recent Accessions.^ - — i 199 

Califobnia State Publications Received Dueing Januaey, Febeuaey 

jktto Maech, 1922 -__ 235 

Califoenia City Publications Received Dueing Januaey, Febeuaey 

and Maech, 1922 238 

Books foe the Blind Added Dueing Octobeb, Novembeb and Decembee, 

1921, and Januaey, Febeuaey and Maech, 1922 , 238 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the Califoenia. 
State Libeaby. 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, Sac- 
ramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-class matter December, 1913, at the post office at Sacramento, 
California, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorised August 27, 1918. 



I BELIEVE. 

By Ella D. Soule. 



If you should ask me to repeat the 
Articles of Faith, being a bit confused as 
to the wording of my Creed, I might 
safely begin, "I believe in the bounty 
Library. I believe it lives up to what 
it stands for." 

It is not simply giving books, good 
books, to the people of this county ; it 
is actually shaping and coloring lives. 
They may be too unthinking to tell you, 
perhaps too inarticulate to express their 
thoughts. Perhaps because it is free 
they take it without even conscious 
thankfulness, but take it they do. 

In our locality we have had a beloved 
doctor who, when he was called to a 
farmhouse during illness, often followed 
up his visit with a book or two from his 
own library, perhaps with some maga- 
zines as well. He seemed to know that 
often the broken farm wife was suffer- 
ing as much from isolation and mind 
starvation as she was from overwork. 
The books had their part in bringing 
back health. But you had to be sick to 
get them. What of the folk whose mus- 
cles stayed disgustingly healthy and 
whose mental outlook went flat? 

A young deputy tax collector recounted 
to me a few years ago his experiences 
in the remote Klamath River section. 
His country was covered on horseback 
over the roughest part of the mining sec- 
tion of Western Siskiyou. He told me that 
once when night overtook him he was 
obliged to ask for shelter at the cabin 
of a miner. This man had married an 
Indian girl and, completely burying him- 
self from the outside world, had settled 
down in seeming content with his family 
of little "breeds" in a one-roomed cabin 
far up in a canyon. Disagreeable as 
was the errand of the tax collector, the 
advent of a stranger was welcomed lus- 
tily by the white man. But his coming 
caused no seeming ripple of curiosity 
from the stoical mother and daughters, 
silently weaving baskets on the earth 
floor by a fireplace. My friend's account 
of his sojourn was very humorous till 
suddenly he sobered with, "The only 
book I found in that house was an eight- 
year-old magazine, thumbed, read and re- 



read until it was filthy and in tatters. 
Think of the stagnation of mind ; an 
eight-year-old magazine !" 

Now among the treasures of the county 
librarian are snapshots of wood scenes 
taken on some long auto trip, or on the 
mule trails where she has gone to estab- 
lish or revisit branches of the county 
library in that same locality. I think 
it is a splendid thing for the librarian to 
take those bone-racking, pulse-stopping 
journeys into her furthest territory. 
When she packs the next shipment of 
books she has the inner vision of the 
lonely women watching from their door- 
steps until the last bit of dust has set- 
tled after the isolated passer-by ; of little 
children hurrying miles through the 
forests to school ; and she selects with 
graver thought the books that can broad- 
en them and break down the barriers 
that surround their lives. 

The happiest thing about the library 
to me (aside from the librarian herself, 
God love her) is that it brings to me 
the books I like. It is a tragic thing 
to shape your reading tastes to that of 
your neighbors, worse than being obliged 
to wear their clothes. 

Before the library came to us I bor- 
rowed eagerly, exhausting the meagre 
book-shelves of my neighbors for miles 
around. One summer I stuffed on defec- 
tive stories, a class of reading that has 
no appeal to me, simply because my 
neighbor had a weakness for mysteries, 
veiled ladies, closed cabs, glass stoppers 
and betraying fingerprints. And once, in 
a critical illness, I quite scandalized my 
mother-in-law by babbling in my delirium 
in pure Scotch, because a friend of mine 
loved Ian McLaren and such as he, and 
had impulsively surfeited me with them. 
The poor lady felt that I must have had 
a past up my sleeve. 

It may be said that everyone should 
put aside a budget for books. On a farm 
so little is left for personal indulgence 
and books cost so — titles, too, are so 
deceiving. If one does not have a guid- 
ing knowledge of authors, one spends to 
so little satisfaction. Do you know, I 
set my heart on a book once, and waited 



144 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



four years for it, until I got it. Always 
I was on the alert. 

But one dear friend I knew had books 
just to my liking and he lent them to 
me freely. I read them, in the sun, with 
a handkerchief across my mouth, for I 
knew the poor man had read them, 
coughing the long night hours of pain 
away. He was dying of tuberculosis, and 
yet I "took a chance." 

Can you realize what it meant to me 
to have in my hands my first "Special 
Request" book — and oh, joy, to cut the 
pages myself! 

The books we get are mind-stretchers. 
I feel sure that the librarians try to give 
us just as fast as we can assimilate 
them, books of a better standard than 
those we asked for last. Through their 
selection our tastes are improving and 
advancing. How happy one librarian 
was when I told her I had found joy 
in Diana of the Crossways. She told 
me that lovers of Meredith were born 
and not trained. She considered me a 
find. I did not confess to her what I 
am shamelessly telling you, that the first 
winter of our marriage my husband and 
I, snowbound in an old log farmhouse, 
read night after night and liked them, 
books of Bertha M. Clay, Nick Carter 
and Mary J. Holmes. 

For years in our district school we 
had a young woman who was a pains- 
taking and conscientious teacher. But 
her taste for literature was nil. To her 
a story was a story. She read in recrea- 
tion hours to the children endlessly of 
the Rover Boys. I was so happy when. 
after the county library was established, 
these were replaced by Master Skylark, 
Captains Courageous, or Kindred of the 
Wild. 

During vacation I read to my children 
the "Adventures of Nils." I hardly 
thought that the baby had grasped much 
of it. It was to the older two that 1 
r=>ad while he played about or fell asleep 
to the cadence of my voice. But one day 
he came flying in from his play with the 
herald, "Come Mama. come. I hear Aka 
calling to me, 'Not this year but next. 
Not this year but next.' " And sure 



enough, there high in the blue the wedge- 
shaped flight of the first geese of the 
fall ! 

Wood-hauling time in October is a 
strenuous season — more so than thresh- 
ing, or even butchering time. How we 
women dread it ! The farmer rises at 
an unbelievable hour and with heavy 
team starts before dawn for the moun- 
tains, to bring down his logs for winter 
cutting. My worn and tired little neigh- 
bor told me, "This is the first Fall I 
have not dreaded wood-hauling time. 
Since we got hold of that star book I 
can hardly wait to get the men's lunch 
put up and them started on their way — ■ 
to get out and see the sky. All the no- 
account stars are fading out with the 
coming dawn, and just the glorious ones 
waiting.. Then it's beautiful to see how 
the old earth has swung about since I 
saw the stars the night before. I've 
just simply got to have that book for 
my own." 

Doesn't that make for us a new 
Heaven and a new Earth? 

One night we had a wayfarer in to 
supper. We always feed the stranger 
within our gates. He had spent the 
greatest part of his days in sheep folds 
and out-of-the-way cabins. He was none 
too clean, and ravenously hungry. On 
my living-room table he discovered 
"Chief Contemporary Dramatists." To 
my amazement he suddenly became happy 
and voluble. Many of them were old 
favorites of his. How we did visit ! I 
had been aching to talk it over with 
some understanding soul. He begged 
to sit up and read after the family re- 
tired. I trembled for those pages, for he 
was none too clean. Long into the night 
the light burned and his infernal pipe 
fumed. What do you suppose he re- 
membered the longest, back in his moun- 
tain cabin — the honey and waffles, with 
thick cream for his coffee, or "The 
Witching Hour" and "Riders to the 
Sea"? And I forgave him the smoke in 
my curtains. Sometimes to read a book 
and to love it and to keep it all to your- 
self is like wishing "Merry Christmas" 
to yourself when you are a hundred miles 
from home. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



HAWAIIAN NOTES. 



145 



NOTES FROM HAWAII. 



In February the librarians in the 
Hawaiian Islands had a minature con- 
vention. Miss Robson writes in regard 
to it: 

"You may have read something of the 
funeral ceremonies for our Delegate to 
Congress, Prince Kalanianeole, who 
died last month. Our convention, being 
small and flexible, was moved ahead a 
week so that the girls from the other 
islands could be here in time to witness 
the ceremonies. It is the last state fun- 
eral for Hawaiian royalty, so the occa- 
sion was an historical event. There was 
a barbaric splash of color with it all, 
and ancient customs that will die out 
with the present generation. Unfortu- 
nately, every now and then a bit of 
modern life would spoil things, such as 
the automobile hearse in the two night 
processions. 

The convention lasted two days. II 
was most informal. The first day we 
went around the island, visiting school 
and community branches. In the even- 
ing there was an informal open meeting 
for which invitations had been sent. 
Here the Superintendent of Public In- 
struction spoke, as well as Karl Lee- 
brick, now a professor at the University 
of Hawaii. Then there were reports of 
progress from Miss Newman on Hawaii, 
Miss Morse on Maui, and myself on 
Oahu. Afterwards, refreshments and a 
social time. The different librarians 
then organized a library association. The 
second day we went over routine matters, 
and talked over the course of study lists 
with some outside librarians and teach- 



ers, and in the afternoon, visited some 
of the libraries " in Honolulu. Then a 
staff party at night." 

Other items of interest taken from 
various letters from Miss Robson are as 
follows : 

"The newest county to organize — 
Kauai, has been offered $75,000 for a 
library building. A community house, 
costing about the same, is already being 
built there, which will take care of an 
auditorium, club rooms, etc. 

We are having a number of changes 
on the staff in the next two weeks. Miss 
Gertrude McLaughlin takes up her work 
in Kauai on the first of April. Miss 
Helen Greene from the Oakland Library, 
arrives in two weeks to be with me and 
Miss Reba Dwight from Los Angeles, 
comes on the same boat to take the chil- 
dren's work here. She will be in Hono- 
lulu until June, when she will go to Hilo 
to take the position left by Miss Gaboon, 
and a children's librarian from Portland 
will continue with the children's work 
here. 

I am not being a county librarian here 
because we are a department of the ter- 
ritorial library. This department will 
handle the schools and Honolulu stations 
as well as rural stations. We are not 
bothered by supplementary readers. Our 
school service is voluntary. All school 
finances are controlled by the Honolulu 
office and there is no book fund. Practi- 
cally the only books the children in the 
country ever see are those from the 
library. It is all quite different from 
the states." 



146 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA, SHOWING COUNTIES. 



£eft/tue/e cf Cap* Ck/ 
4Z- U 



f n r 



DEL NORTE i ^J a J 

,'_ SISKIYOU | MODOC 

h S ^,- t L 



<0 i ! 

^~ , TRINITY,' 



SHASTA 



■ GLENN I BUTTE 



//. .T.ctv—nJ.fb. VNFRNtCISCO 



\LAKEV -A -^l£.t* 
,y * \ ^.A YOLO "V- / ELDORADO 

^Si / ;\° /TUOLUMNE^ 

\* -' -^ j i 

*,\\ ( - fresno ,.r- I 

%A />/ TuuAPE I 






..VENTURA 



SAN BERNARDINO 



%, 



33* N. _ 
t*t. Qcrtlsnn. S C. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



LIST OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 



147 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 
Statistics of July 1, 1921. 



County 



Income 

1920-1921* 



Books, 
etc. 



W 


H 






a 


agg* 


tr 


Sc-^o 








— S"n ™ 








' m c n 




ff3 C 




! 3£§ 







» o 

ere, 

o £ 



Alameda 

Amador 

Butte 

Colusa 

Contra Costa- 
Fresno 

Glenn 

Humboldt 

Imperial 

Inyo 

Kem 

Kings 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Madera 

Merced 

Modoe 

Monterey __: 

Napa 

Orange .. 

Plumas 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino. 

San Diego 

San Joaquin 

San Luis Obispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 



Miss Mary Barmby 

Miss Frances M. Burket. 



44 



Mrs Dorothy C. Worden 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck 

Miss Sarah E. McCardle 

Missi Maude Middleton 

Miss Ida M. Reagan 

Mrs Thomas B. Beeman 

Miss Anne Margrave 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock 

Miss Eleanore Kyle 

Miss Lenala Martin 

Miss Celia Gleason 

§Miss Julia Steffa 

Miss Winifred H. Bigley 

Miss Anna L. Williams 

Miss Anne Hadden 

Miss Estella DeF'ord 

Miss Margaret Livingston 

Miss Carmelita Duff 

Miss Lillian L. Dickson 

Miss Cornelia D. Provines 

Mrs Ora M. Regnart 

Miss Caroline S. Waters 

Miss Eleanor Hitt 

H. O'. Parkinson 

Miss Flo A. Gantz 

Miss Edna Holroyd 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Miss Stella Huntington 

Miss Minerva H. Waterman.. 

Not started 

Miss Thelma Brackett 

Miss Clara B. Dills 

Not started 

Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn 

Miss Edna J. Hewitt 

Miss Elizabeth Stevens _. 

Miss Lila G. Dobell 

Miss Gretchen Flower 

Miss Helen Rowland 

Miss Elizabeth R. Topping... 
Miss Nancy C. Laugenour 



Sept. 26 
June 2 
Sept. 3 
June 8 
July 21 
Mar. 12 
April 8 
May 12 
Feb. 6 
Sept. 15 
Nov. 16 
June 4 
Sept. 
Sept. 
May 
June 
July 
April 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
July 14 : 
April 5 
Mar. 7 
July 6 
Sept. 5 
Feb. 16 
July 20 
Oct. 13 
May 10. 
June 7 
April 6 
May 11 
Aug. 14 
May 9 
Aug. 8 
Sept. 8 
June 10 
July 3 
April 9 
July 12 



1910 
1919 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1910 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1919 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1917 
1915 
1914 
1916 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
1910 



$34,400 00 

5,124 57 
18,327 78 

9,522 25 
40,783 24 
106,515 10 
14,068 10 
25,041 16 
11,256 65 

8,065 56 
61,979 17 
21,044 24 

9,317 85 
174,890 55 
24,159 13 
28,114 77 

3,295 45 
17,647 20 
10,437 50 



7,365 43 
11,540 76 
19,308 74 

7,070 00 
24,591 83 
27,844 68 
18,369 75 
13,243 68 

8,012 70 
15,862 37 
23,035 71 

6,890 30 



12,917 69 
16,571 59 



22,135 52 
10.193 24 
8,272 69 
4,971 30 
30,729 62 
7,890 17 
21,916 88 
15,737 98 



73,120 
4,441 
38,362 
25,395 
78,981 

207,785 
20,499 
44,604 
43,971 
16,417 

106,125 
65,275 
21,340 

292,944 
52,083 

a51,809 
6,407 
43,728 
6,805 



19,314 



14,660 
11,317 
59.577 
66,731 



17,013 
19.828 


56,986 





46,542 
32,909 



37,313 
20,729 
21,410 
14,046 
66,925 
20,971 
33,567 
50,145 



O 1,'08-D 9,'19 . $958,462 90 al,810,074 3,639 



73 
20 
97 
54 
93 

198 
82 

150 
66 
44 

151 
69 
76 

317 
94 
74 
14 

149 
61 



67 

68 

95 

58 

138 

143 

75 

72 

52 

124 

100 

83 



120 
64 



52 
72 
56 
136 
54 
67 
79 



80 
41 
70 
36 
60 

170 
47 

111 
50 
31 

114 
48 
44 

204 
50 
76 



54 



31 
81 

84 
33 
80 
121 
95 
93 
40 
74 
90 
57 



67 
35 
62 
23 
139 
32 



2,920 



61 
30 
51 

135 
40 
89 
52 

28 



42 
132 
47 
55 
13 
64 
38 



50 



*The income as given does not include balance in fund July 1, 1920. 
§Appointed librarian April 4, 1922. 



148 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 

Only those California libraries are listed for which there were news items. For 
complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1921. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Area, 158,297 sq. miles. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 3,426,536. 

Assessed valuation, $4,555,445,447. 

Number of counties, 58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third class.) 

- County seat, Oakland. 

Area, 810 sq. mi. Top. 344,127. 

Assessed valuation $314,044,200 (tax- 
able for county $274,842,032). 

Alameda. 

§|| Alameda Free Public Library.. 
Mrs Marcella H. Krauth, Lib'n. 

At our regular house-cleaning at the 
beginning of the year a large collection 
of duplicate magazines and several hun- 
dred discarded books, mostly from the 
Webster Street Branch, were sent upon 
request to San Quentin. 

Beside the addition of a regular substi- 
tute, all the employees have received an 
increase in salary. 

Marcella H. Kkautii, Lib'n. 

Berkeley. 

||§Berkeley [Free] Public Library. 
Carlton B. Joeckel, Lib'n. 

On January 7, 1022, the City Council 
authorized the purchase of an addition to 
the main library lot. This addition has 
a frontage of 100 feet on Kittredge 
street and has a depth of 100 feet. The 
complete library lot now has a frontage 
of 104 feet on Shattuck avenue and 230 
feet on Kittredge street. This location 
is regarded by real estate men as one 
of the best in the city, and the site is 
now large enough for a real building. 
Payment for the land purchased is being 
made in installments from funds appro- 
priated by the Council. 

C. B. Joeckel, Lib'n. 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

Garfield Junior High School Li- 
brary. Miss Elizabeth I. Patton, Lib'n. 

Elizabeth I. Patton, formerly librarian 
at Santa Cruz High School, is now li- 
brarian at Garfield Junior High School, 
Berkeley. 

Pacific Unitarian School for the 
Ministry Library. Earl M. Wilbur, 
Pres. Miss Lillian Burt, Lib'n. 

The Pacific Unitarian School for the 
Ministry at Berkeley has recently com- 
pleted and occupied its new library build- 
ing at 2400 Allston way, facing the Uni- 
versity campus at the Dana street en- 
trance. The building is of reinforced 
concrete in a modified Renaissance style, 
and cost, furnished, about $45,000. The 
reading room is 22 by 54 feet, and is 
open to the public as a reading room for 
Unitarian and general religious litera- 
ture. The stack is of approved steel con- 
struction, and has a capacity of nearly 
30,000 volumes, being about double the 
present size of the collection. Over the 
reading room are class rooms, a chapel 
and offices. This library claims to pos- 
sess the most comprehensive and com- 
plete collection of Unitariana in exist- 
ence, and has in this line many very rare 
volumes. Requests from other libraries 
for inter-library loans in the general field 
of religious literature will be gladly met. 
Earl- M. Wilbur, Pres. 

#$§ University of California Li- 
brary. J. C. Rowell, Lib'n Emeritus ; 
Harold L. Leupp, Lib'n. 

The private library of Dr August 
Fournier, late professor of history at the 
University of Vienna, has been purchased 
in Paris by the University of California. 
The library, of a historical nature, com- 
prises a collection of 1200 numbers of 
approximately 4000 volumes. It includes 
very rare German editions of works deal- 
ing with the Napoleonic period. — San 
Francisco Chronicle, Ap 1 



VOl. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



149 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland. 

§||Oakland Free [Public] Library. 

Chas. S. Greene, Lib'n. 

On February 6, the new Allendale 
Branch, located at 2S70 3Sth avenue, was 
formally opened, with appropriate exer- 
cises, under the auspices of the Mother's 
Club. Mrs Quayle, President of the Li- 
brary Board, made a brief address and 
read a letter from the Mayor congratu- 
lating the people of Allendale. 

A considerable amount of much needed 
renovation has been done at the Main 
Library, 14th and Grove streets. The 
Children's Room and Magazine Room 
walls and ceilings were repainted, and 
the woodwork and furniture in the entire 
building gone over. 

Miss Edith A. Hibberd, Chief of the 
Magazine and Music Department, has 
been granted a four months' leave of 
absence to visit in New York City. Miss 
Jeannette C. Anderson, assistant at Pied- 
mont Avenue Branch, has been appointed 
librarian at Allendale, and Miss Ruth 
Cralle of the substitute staff has been 
appointed to the position of library 
assistant. Miss Helen Greene has re- 
signed her position as assistant, in order 
to accept a position in the Honolulu Li- 
brary. She will serve as assistant to 
Miss Laura Robson. Miss Alice Mc- 
Comb is leaving her position at Alden 
Branch in April to be married. 

At the annual election in January of 
the Staff Association, the following were 
elected officers to serve for one year : 
Chairman, Lucie C. Nye ; Department 
Heads, Florence M. Van Gaasbeek ; 
Branch Librarians, Nettie V. Morgan ; 
First Assistants, Clara N. Bishop ; Assist- 
ants, Helen H. Rand ; Substitutes, Ruth 
Cralle ; Bookmenders, Minnie Spilman. 
The purpose of the Association is to 
"enable us to act more effectively for 
the furtherance of our common interests, 
and also to foster among us the growth 
of professional spirit and to promote the 
general efficiency of the library service 
. . . ." Mrs Elsie W. Leelert, Misses 
Grace G. Ransome and Olive Hartley 
have been appointed to the Program 
Committee to arrange the staff meetings 
for the six months beginning January. 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Oakland — Continued. 

1922, and Misses Mabel W. Thomas, 
Emelita Cohen and Elsie Schaufler have 
been appointed to the Staff Bulletin 
Committee. 

Mr. H. A. Snow returned from Africa 
January 13, but is now in Los Angeles 
making arrangements in regard to the 
films taken on his expedition. The city 
has made a first payment of $10,000 on 
the Kendall property, fronting Lake Mer- 
ritt, for a site for a new Museum build- 
ing'- Chas. S. Greene, Lib'n. 

||*Mills College, Margaret Carnegie 
Library. Aurelia Henry Reinhardt, Pres. 
Mrs Elizabeth Gray Potter, Lib'n. 

Mrs Mira B. Bennett, for the last 
eight years assistant librarian at Mills 
College, died today of pneumonia. She 
was the granddaughter of Peter M. Bur- 
nett, first governor of California. — San 
Francisco Gall, Mr IS 



San Leandro. 

§San Leandro Free Public Library 
and Branch, Alameda Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Mary Brown, Lib'n. 

Mrs George J. Helms and W. O. Da- 
vies, principal of the local grammar 
school, have been appointed as library 
trustees to fill the vacancies caused by 
the resignations of Mrs Josephine Rus- 
sell and C. A. Harwell. 

The members of the University Li- 
brary School Class paid us a visit Tues- 
day' March 28. They were accompanied 
by Miss Mary Barmby, Miss Baird and 
Miss Everett of the Alameda County 
Free Library. 

The San Leandro Health Center is 
now permanently located in very pleas- 
ant and comfortable quarters adjoining 
the auditorium. 

Mary Brown, Lib'n. 



ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 

County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 243. 
Assessed valuation .$S12,937 (taxable 
for county $717,061). 



150 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class). 

County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 7793. 
Assessed valuation $6,925,58S (taxable 
for county $5,965,035). 

Amador Co. Free Library, Jackson. 
Miss Frances M. Burket, Lib'n. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall made us a 
delightful visit during the month of Feb- 
ruary. Trips were made to the branches 
and - schools in Amador City, Sutter 
Creek and Tone. While in lone, we 
called on Mrs Nelly Latham Snyder, li- 
brarian and censor at the Preston School 
of Industry, and spent a very pleasant 
hour looking over the buildings and 
grounds. 

Mrs Ralph Garbarini, former custodian 
of the Electra Branch, has moved to 
Jackson. Mrs S. F. Smith was appoint- 
ed to take her place. 

Several fine volumes have been donated 
to the county library by interested pa- 
trons, during the past quarter. 

Frances M. Burket, Lib'n. 

Electra (Exp. Jackson). 

Electra Branch, Amador Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Amador Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second class.) 

County seat, Oroville. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 30,030. 
Assessed valuation " $43,305,078 (tax- 
able for county $35,863,709). 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville. 

Miss Essae M. Culver, former libra- 
rian of Glenn county and for the past six 
years librarian of Butte County Free Li- 
brary, has tendered her resignation to 
the Board of Supervisors. Miss Culver 
enters the employ of the State Library 
at Sacramento April 1. — Willows Jour- 
nal, Mr 13 

A branch of the County Free Library 
was established at Durham High School 
in January, 1922. 



BUTTE CO.— Continued. 

Chico. 

Chico [Free] Public Library. Miss 
Laura A. Sawyers, Lib'n. 

The will of Mrs Alice Eliot, who died 
recently at Chico, leaves $1000 to the 
Chico Public Library. This is the first 
testamentary gift ever received by this 
library. — Sacramento Bee, Ja 17 



Durham. 

Durham High School Branch, 
Butte Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished in January, 1922. 



CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth class.) 

County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 990 sq. mi. Pop. 6183. 
Assessed valuation $S,5S7,433 (tax- 
able for county $7,618,065). 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

( Fort y-second class.) 

County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 1080 sq. mi. Pop. 9290. 
Assessed valuation $8,587,433 (tax- 
able for county $7,618,065). 

Colusa Co. Free Library, Colusa. 
Mrs Dorothy C. Worden, Lib'n. 

The County Librarian talked to the 
Arbuckle Women's Club March 22, on 
the work of the County Library, and 
some of its newer books. Interest in 
the library in Arbuckle has greatly im- 
proved since the establishment of the 
reading room. Almost phenomenal in- 
creases in circulation have shown the 
value of a reading room — small though 
it may be. In December Arbuckle's 
monthly circulation was 85 — in January, 
after a month of the reading room, the 
circulation jumped to 414 — and the 
March circulation doubled that, being 
847. 

College City has also jumped from 539 
circulation in December, to 1020 in 
March since the large reading room has 
been open. 



Vol. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



151 



COLUSA CO.— Continued. 

On January 18 we were delighted to 
receive an unexpected visit from Mrs 
Henshall. It was the very coldest day 
of the year but Mrs Henshall is the 
very best sport in the world and accom- 
panied us out to a ranch where the 
monthly meeting of the Teachers' Club 
was held. She talked to the club about 
the work of the State Library. We were 
so glad to have her and hope she may 
come often. 

Miss Elizabeth Stevens of Tehama 
county paid us a visit the last week in 
March. We wish these neighborly visits 
could be a regular institution as they 
are an inspiration and help. 

The County Federation of Women's 
Clubs held a convention in Colusa, Feb- 
ruary 7. A musical symposium was 
given, the County Librarian giving a 
short talk on what the County Library 
can do to further the interests of music 
in the county. 

An inventory of all the books in the 
County Library and its branches has 
been begun. The books in the County 
Library now number 23,676. 

Dorothy C. Worden, Lib'n. 

Arbuckle. 

Aebuckle Branch, Colusa Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

College City. 

College City Branch, Colusa Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 

County seat, Martinez. 
Area, 750 sqi mi. Pop. 53,889. 
Assessed valuation $87,374,S77 (tax- 
able for county $78,038,745). 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Crescent City. 
Area, 1546 sq. mi. Pop. 2759. 
Assessed' valuation $9,453,336 (taxable 
for county $9,418,286). { 



EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 

County seat, Placerville. 
Area. 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 6426. 
Assessed valuation $11,805,740 (tax- 
able for county $10,251,830). 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 

County seat, Fresno. 
Area, 5696 sq. mi. Pop. 128,779. 
Assessed valuation $1SS,332,264 (tax- 
able for county $161,432,260). 

$Fresno Co. Free Library, Fresno. 
Miss Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 

The branch at Kingsburg has been 
moved into a new place, near the old 
location. This is a pleasant room, newly 
finished, and the custodian, Mrs Ren- 
frew, with the help of six of the assist- 
ants from the main library got every- 
thing straightened up so that the library 
was closed only a short time. 

Miss Edith Vea Lawrence, custodian 
at Riverdale, was married in February 
to Mr William Perry. Miss Lawrence 
resigned her position and Mrs S. L. 
Hubbard was appointed to fill the va- 
cancy. 

The County Hospital Branch has been 
closed for a month on account of quar- 
antine against influenza and smallpox. 
This is a flourishing branch and the 
patients are always sorry when it has 
to be closed. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall spent a 
couple of days in the library in March. 
Mrs Henshall talked to the staff one 
afternoon, giving them an account of 
some of her interesting experiences. It 
is always a great pleasure to have any 
of the State Library staff visit us. 

Sarah E. McCardle, Lib'n. 

With the signing of an agreement be- 
tween the trustees of the Fresno County 
Law Library and the board of supervi- 
sors February 7, the law library became 
a part of the County Free Library. 
The agreement stated that the supervi- 
sors would pay one hundred dollars a 
month into the library fund to pay a 
portion of a custodian's salary. It was 
announced that attorneys will have ac- 



152 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



FRESNO CO.— Continued, 
cess to the law library at all hours and 
on every day. — Fresno Republican, F 9 

Fresno Co. Hospital Branch 
Fresno Co. Free Library. 

See note under Fresno Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Fresno Co. Law Library, Fresno. 

See note under Fresno Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Kingsburg. 

Kingsbueg Branch, Fresno Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Fresno Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Riverdale. 

Riverdale Branch, Fresno Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Fresno Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

GLENN COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 

County seat, Willows. 
Area, 1460 sq. mi. Pop. 11,858. 
Assessed valuation $27,(303,950 (tax- 
able for county $23,S66,41S). 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows. 
Miss Maude Middleton, Lib'n. 

The Hamilton City Branch was moved 
from the bank building to the McKenzie 
building, which gives the library two 
rooms. This building will be more com- 
fortable for the people using the reading 
room, also it will be more convenient for 
the custodian to handle the branch. 

Miss Valerie Magnenat was appointed 
custodian of the Orland Branch Librarj 
to succeed Miss Elise Trimble. Mr Wal- 
ter Roden, custodian of Chrome Branch, 
filed his resignation to become effective 
February 1, and Mrs L. E. Cooper was 
appointed to succeed him. Mrs Agnes 
Klinger resigned as custodian of Butte 
City Branch, resignation to become effec- 
tive February 1, and Mr Jackson James 
was appointed to succeed her. 

Maude Middleton. Lib'n. 

Butte City. 

Butte City Branch, Glenn Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Glenn Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



GLENN CO.— Continued. 

Chrome (P. O. Millsaps). 

Chrome Branch, Glenn Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Glenn Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Hamilton City. 

Hamilton City Branch, Glenn Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Glenn Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Orland. 

Orland Free Library and Branch, 
Glenn Co. Free Library. Elise M. 
Trimble, Lib'n. 

The Orland Free Library, for the first 
time since it was started in 1914, passed 
the 1000 mark in Januarv for its total 
circulation of books and magazines. The 
exact figure is 1008. February, although 
the shortest month of the year, outdid 
the previous month, its total being 1057 
books and magazines. March gave a bet- 
ter record yet, 1271 books and magazines 
being taken out during that month. 
These figures do not include the num- 
ber of books received from the State Li- 
brary or county libraries. The borrow- 
ers who avail themselves of this service 
seem to appreciate very much the possi- 
bility of getting the information they 
desire in this manner and their requests 
cover a great variety of subjects. 

Valerie Magnenat, Acting Lib'n. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 

County seat, Eureka. 
Area, 3507 sq. mi. Pop. 37,413. 
Assessed valuation $42,560,904 (tax- 
able for county $38,969,254). 

Humboldt Co. Free Library, Eureka. 
Miss Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

The County Librarian contributed au 
article to the Christmas edition of the 
Humboldt County Standard on "The 
County Library ' System" and she also 
wrote for the booklet issued by the 
Eureka Chamber of Commerce an article 
on the early history of Humboldt Coun- 
ty. The County Board of Education is 
revising the county course of study and 



Vol. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



153 



H U M BO LDT. CO.— Continued, 
the county librarian has been in consul- 
tation with the _ members . of the board 
several times regarding the changes to 
be made. 

We feel that with Mr W. H. Parker, 
former County School Superintendent of 
Siskiyou County, acting as rural super- 
visor in the county, we have another line 
of contact with the schools. We find 
him a good "middle man.'' 

During the quarter branches were es- 
tablished in Buck Mountain and Strong 
school districts. 

Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

Buck Mountain School Dist. (P. O. 

Bridgeville; no exp. office). 

Buck Mountain School Dist. 
Branch, Humboldt Co. Free Library, 
was established March 31, 1922. 

Strong School Dist. (P. O. Carlotta; 

no exp. office). 

Strong School Dist. Branch, Hum- 
boldt Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished Jan. 12, 1922. 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 

County seat, El Centre 
Area, 4316 sq. mi. Pop. 43,383. 
Assessed valuation $47,510,133 (tax- 
able for county $40,580,941). 

Imperial Co. Feee Library, El Cen- 
tro. Mrs Thomas B. Beeman, Lib'n. 

The county library has received a 
splendid collection of about 75 books 
from Mr A. P. .Shibley, City Superin- 
tendent of Schools. — El Centro Press. 
F 15 

Brawley. 

Brawley Union High School Li- 
brary. Geo. R. Momyer, Prin. 

Other persons may be interested in a 
plan we are trying out in our library 
to encourage our people to plan good con- 
structive social recreation in their homes. 

We have placed a shelf known as "The 
Good Time Shelf." On it we have placed 
the following books : Handbook of Ath- 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 
Brawley — Continued, 
letic Games, Bancroft and Pulvermacher ; 
The American Chess Players Hand 
Book ; The Mary Dawson Game 
Book, Dawson ; Amateur Circus Life, 
Balch ; The Book of Games and Parties, 
Walcott ; Health by Stunts, Pearl and 
Brown ; How to Teach Children Through 
Stories, McCracken ; Athletic Training, 
Murphy ; Recreation for Young and Old, 
Ebright ; Games for the Play Ground, 
Home and Gymnasium, Bancroft ; Good 
Times for Girls, Moxcey. 

In addition to the books, the English 
classes have compiled a book composed 
of descriptions of the best games known 
to our high school students. In this 
way w r e have compiled a selection of 
about two hundred games in addition to 
those in the books. Some of these are 
original and most of them are quite in- 
teresting as they represent the student's 
choice from among the games he knows. 

The organizations in the town through 
their social committees are coming to use 
this shelf and we feel already that it 
has been well worth the investment. 

Geo. R. Momyer, Prin. 

Imperial. 

Imperial [ Free] Public Library 
and Branch, Imperial Co. Free Li- 
brary. Mrs D. W. Hatch, Lib'n. 

Miss Winifred Coffin of Santa Bar- 
bara was in the Imperial Public Library 
for six weeks and assisted in cataloging 
over 500 volumes. She was formerly on 
the Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Library staff. 
Jessie H. Hatch, Lib'n. 

INYO COUNTY. 

(Forty-seventh class.) 

County seat, Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 7031. 
Assessed valuation $17,033,180 (tax- 
able for county $10,623,319). 

Inyo Co. Free Library, Independ- 
ence. Miss Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

The visit of Mrs May Dexter Hen- 
shall looms up as the most interesting 
event of the quarter. She was with us 
from March 13 to 16, and the time was 
spent in visiting some of the branches, 



154 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



INYO CO.— Continued, 
from Bishop, fifty miles north, to Keeler, 
thirty miles south. We had no time to 
seek out our scenic wonders, but they 
force themselves upon our attention from 
every side, calling one to a closer ac- 
quaintance, so we are hoping some day 
to take Mrs Henshall with us up into 
those mountains. She had not been in 
Inyo County for some years, and found 
evidence of a healthy growth in all 
lines of library service. 

On the second day of her visit, it 
happened that the Woman's Club of In- 
dependence had asked for the use of the 
library room for a reception in honor of 
Mrs Emily Reade Fahs, of New York. 
We were happy to have two guests of 
honor. ( Such use of the library is not 
habitual with us, but our temporary lack 
of a public place of meeting makes it 
necessary sometimes.) 

Mrs V. V. Davis, custodian at Tecopa, 
whose willing service had been handi- 
capped by distance from the local center, 
has resigned in favor of Mrs Frank Tur- 
ner. 

Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

Tecopa. 

Tecopa Branch, Inyo Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Inyo Co. Free Library. 

KERN COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 

County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area. 8150 sq. mi. Pop. 54.843. 
Assessed valuation $186,312,770 (tax 
able for county .$163,211,137). 

Bakersfield. 

§Beale Memorial [Free Public] Li- 
brary. Miss Sarah E. Bedinger, Lib'n. 

The library grows steadily, the circu- 
lation for the quarter being 55,082. 

The Bakersfield Radio Club has placed 
on file several radio magazines and other 
literature and with what we have on the 
shelves this makes quite a good selection 
on wireless work. 

Owing to a siege of influenza, all in 
the Main Library were laid low for over 
a month and we were obliged to give the 



KERN CO.— Continued. 
Bakersfield — Continued. 
Macedonian cry. The Jibrary was kept 
open by the girls from the branches, 
taking turns, until the Board was able 
to get a supply in Mrs Miriam C. Post, 
who has helped us wonderfully. 

The branch established in the Lincoln 
school has been quite a success. This 
school has over six hundred pupils, who 
are mostly foreigners, Italians, Portu- 
guese and Mexicans. The circulation for 
March was five hundred and fifteen 
books. Two of the teachers, Misses 
White and Kendrick, undertook the work 
of keeping the place open, and the people 
owe them a vote of thanks. Unfortu- 
nately this branch will have to be closed 
during the summer. 

Sarah E. Bedinger, Lib'n. 

KINGS COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth class.) 

County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1373 sq. mi. Pop. 22,031. 
Assessed valuation $28,206,785 (tax- 
able for county $24,175,435). 

Kings Co. Free Library, Hanford. 
Miss Eleanore Kyle, Lib'n. 

Following recent adoptions by the 
County Board of Education, the sets of 
supplemental reading material (charts, 
phonic and phrase cards, etc.) which 
have been in use for the past two years, 
will be discarded next year and an en- 
tirely new set issued to each school. The 
work of processing this new material has 
occupied practically all of the past month. 
Inventory has been taken of the collec- 
tions at all branches. 

Mrs Henshall visited the library March 
20 and 21. 

Eleanore Kyle, Lib'n. 

Hanford. 

Hanford Free Public Library and 
Branch, Kings Co. Free Library. Miss 
Eleanore Kyle, Lib'n. 

Miss Helen Rice, former assistant li- 
brarian, resigned March IS to be married 
to Mr Arthur Butcher. They will make 
their home near Stavely, Alberta, Can- 
ada. Miss Mildred Watson has been ap- 
pointed part-time assistant. 

Eleanore Kyle, Lib'n. 



VOl. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 155 






LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 

County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5402. 
Assessed valuation $6,755,820 (taxable 
for county $6,730,040). 

LASSEN COUNTY. 

(Forty-fourth class.) 

County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. S507. 
Assessed valuation $16,639,7X4 (tax- 
able for county $12,778,834). 

Lassen Co. Free Library, Susan- 
ville. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

Four deposit stations were established 
with business firms for reference and 
business service. They are the follow- 
ing : Lassen County Abstract Office, Feb- 
ruary 15; Lassen Industrial Bank, Feb- 
ruary 15 ; Lassen County Chamber of 
Commerce, February 27 ; J. N. Bidwell, 
Civil Engineer, March 25. The County 
Library is adding a technical pamphlet 
collection to further the service of these 
deposit stations. 

The County Librarian had charge of, 
and spoke on the program, for the Susan- 
ville Parent-Teacher Association. The 
subject was "Free pamphlets of interest 
to mothers and housewives." 

Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 

County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area, 3880 sq. mi. Pop. 936,438. 
Assessed valuation $1,414,564,717 (tax- 
able for county $1,175,262,85S) . 

Alhambra. 

Altiambra TFree] Public Library. 
Miss Artena M. Chapin, Lib'n. 

Miss Alice McWilliams, cataloguer, 
left this library March 31 to accept a 
position in the Pasadena Public Library. 
Miss Alice Fowler, Riverside Library 
School '22, was appointed to fill the 
vacancy, and began her work on the 
first of April. 

At the beginning of the winter term, 
February, the 7th and 8th grade classes 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Alhambra — Continued. 

were given instruction in the library on 
the use of the catalog and reference 
books. High school classes were in- 
structed in reference books, especially the 
use of the Reader's Guide and aids in 
debating. 

The annual wild flower exhibit will be 
held the week beginning April 13. Gram- 
mar school children have been asked to 
bring in as manj*- varieties as possible. 
A copy of Saunders' "Western wild 
flower guide" will be given as a prize to 
the child bringing in the finest bouquet. 
The science classes of the high school 
will co-operate by helping with the 
arrangement, making posters and also 
bringing in some varieties. 

Artena M. Chapin, Lib'n. 

Glendale. 

Glendale Union High School Li- 
brary. George U. Moyse, Prin. Estelle 
D. Lake, Lib'n. 

The library appears to be trying out 
new librarians as it has just effected the 
third change in one year. Miss Char- 
lotte Thomas, who succeeded Mrs Hall 
in November, has recently left for the 
East where she will be married in June 
to Arthur. W. Palmer, formerly of Clare- 
mont, California. They will make their 
home in Washington, D. C. Before go- 
ing to Glendale, Miss Thomas was in the 
Reference Department of the Los An- 
geles Public Library. Her many friends 
in both places wish her all happiness for 
the future. 

Miss Estelle D. Lake, from the library 
of the Southern Branch of the Univer- 
sity of California, has succeeded Miss 
Thomas in the Glendale Union High 
School Library. 

Estelle D. Lake, Lib'n. 

Long Beach. 

§||LoNG Beach [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Zaidee Brown, Lib'n. 

In January and February Miss Ger- 
trude Darlow of the Los Angeles Public 
Library, gave a series of four talks on 
current literature. The talks were open 
to the public and the lecture room was 
crowded each time. Drama, poetry. 



156 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Long Beach — Continued, 
biography, essays and fiction were the 
subjects covered. 

The library has recently purchased a 
collection of one hundred attractive col- 
ored prints. These are the Seemanu 
prints which have been unobtainable for 
several years but which can be pur- 
chased now from Rudolph Lesch. 225 
Fifth avenue, New York, for thirty-five 
cents each. They have been artistically 
mounted and provided with loops for 
hanging so that they can be used for 
home decoration. Patrons are allowed to 
borrow two at one time and keep them 
for one month. They are also loaned in 
quantities to schools and clubs. 

The art exhibits for the past three 
months have included oil paintings by 
Arthur Rozaire, drawings by Karl Tens. 
a collection of wood block prints by vari- 
ous artists and an exhibit of foreign 
colored prints, a number of which were 
purchased by the library. 

Preliminary drawings for the new Bur 
nett Branch have been made and it is 
expected that work on the building will 
commence some time this summer. 

Miss Brown has been granted a year's 
leave of absence, to take effect the last 
of May. She will spend next winter in 
New York working on a series of anno- 
tated reading lists which will be printed 
by the H. W. Wilson Company. During 
Miss Brown's absence Mrs T. R. Brew- 
itt, the assistant librarian, will be in 
charge. Zaidee Brown, Lib'n. 



Los Angeles. 

:|:§Los Angeles [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Everett R. Perry.. Lib'n. 

The City Attorney has ruled that the 
bond furnished by Messrs Goodhue and 
Winslow in connection with their bid on 
architectural services for the new Central 
Library Building was invalid, hence the 
Board was called upon to advertise for 
a second set of bids which have been re- 
ceived and are being considered. Messrs 
Weeks and Day, architects for the State 
Library, are now bidding and Messrs 
Goodhue and Winslow have submitted a 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued, 
second bid. All told, there were ten bids 
in the second lot. 

The City Council on January 17 sold 
•$50Q,C€0 worth of the library bond issue 
to the firm of Drake, Riley and Thomas 
of this city. The premium offered by 
this firm was $6,400 and the rate of in- 
terest 4 J per cent. The above sum is 
now available for preliminary work on 
the Central Library site and for the con- 
struction of the few branch libraries the 
Board has decided to build. 

The first expenditure of the library 
bond issue was for a bungalow library 
placed on the school grounds at Barton 
Hill by permission of the Board of Edu- 
cation. Before this, circulation of books 
was carried on from congested quarters 
in the main school building. Patrons are 
much pleased with the improved facili- 
ties now offered in the little bungalow. 

Sites have been acquired for the new 
branches in the University district and 
in West Hollywood, the former at the 
northeast corner of Thirty-fourth street 
and University avenue ; the latter at the 
northwest corner of Gardner street and 
DeLongpre avenue. Messrs Dodd and 
Richards have been appointed the archi- 
tects for the work in connection with the 
West Hollywood site. 

Mrs Clara V. Winlow, Principal of the 
Foreign Extension Department, resigned, 
to take effect on the first of March, and 
Mrs Maryette G. Mackey, formerly Dean 
of Women in the University of Southern 
California, was appointed to take her 
place, beginning April first. 

The term of Mr Orra E. Monnette, 
President of the Library Board, expired 
December 31, 1921, and he was reap- 
pointed by the Mayor for another term 
of four years. The Library Board has 
organized for the work of 1922 by re- 
electing Mr Monnette president, Frank 
H. Pettingell first vice president, Mrs 
Katherine G. Smith second vice presi- 
dent and Rev Francis J. Conaty treas- 
urer. On January 24 Dr Walter Lind- 
ley, honored member of the board, passed 
away, Mrs Frances M. Harmon-Zahn be- 
ing appointed by the Mayor to act as his 
successor. 



Vol. 17, 110. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



157 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles- — Continued. 
Los Angeles Public Library School. 

Recent special lecturers in the Library 
School have been Mary E. Hyde, former- 
ly instructor in the State Library School 
at Albany, Blanche Gardner, formerly 
in charge of the picture collection in the 
Newark Public Library, Gertrude An- 
drus of Seattle, C. B. Clapp and Leslie 
H. Bliss of the Huntington Library. 
Louise B. Krause of Chicago. Ralph 
rower and Guy E. Marion spoke to tht 
school and special librarians of Los An- 
geles on different phases of business li- 
brary work. Students who elected this 
course were given special practice in 
indexing. 

Mr Goulding's course in advanced cata- 
loging begins April 3, with five special 
students who have had library training 
and experience in addition to the stud- 
ents in the school who have elected this 
course. 

The course in county library work was 
completed in March. Miss Vogelson 
spoke on the California law. and the 
opportunities in this work for those who 
have the pioneer spirit. Other lectures 
dealt with the catalogs and other county 
records, the branch system and work 
with teachers, schools and county insti- 
tutions. The course was practical, and 
instead of merely acquiring samples for 
their collection, the students filled out 
the necessary cards for different records. 

Dorothy Dobbings, 'IS, was married 
to Major John Murdoch Pratt, Medical 
Corps. U. S. Army, February 28. Marion 
Rownd, '20, was married to Mr Oscar 
Palmer, February 28. Helen Estelle 
Rice, '21, was married March 27 to Ar- 
thur Milton Butcher. Their home will 
be in Stavely, Alberta, Canada. Ger- 
trude McLaughlin, 'IS, has been appoint- 
ed librarian of the Kauai County Free 
Library, Territory of Hawaii. Elizabeth 
Boynton, '15, has been appointed assist- 
ant in the library of the southern branch 
of the University of California. Mary 
Caples, '20, is story-teller in one of the 
elementary schools of El Paso. Reba 
Dwight, '20, has a temporary position in 
the children's room of the library of 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles —Continued. 

Honolulu. After June 1, she will be 

children's librarian for the county library 

of Hawaii, with headquarters at Hilo. 

Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

California Society Sons of the 
Revolution (Repository of the South- 
west) and California Society of 
Colonial Wars Library. Pierson W. 
Banning, Vice Pres. Willis Milnor 
Dixon, Lib'n. 

The Society, Sons of the Revolution 
in the State of California, has received 
such a large number of inquiries from 
persons from nearly every state in the 
Union with regard to the rapidly growing 
historical, genealogical reference files 
maintained at their headquarters, it 
seems opportune now to present the fol- 
lowing facts : 

Geographical File Xo. 1 of Societies and 
Organizations. 

Is arranged geographically according 
to alphabetical order ; each state under 
its own heading, is further divided alpha- 
betically. Each state file contains fol- 
ders for constitutions, by-laws, commu- 
nications, lists of names, literature, pam- 
phlets and other small publications issued 
by patriotic societies, genealogical socie- 
ties, historical societies, historical com- 
missions, associations and groups, lodges, 
clubs, public libraries and library asso- 
ciations, colleges and universities and 
kindred organizations. In addition, there 
is data on dealers in old books, county 
officials and local genealogists. There is 
a division in this file devoted to patriots 
and battles in various American wars 
and also a division covering national 
patriotic societies that have only a na- 
tional organization. 

Geographical File Xo. 2 — Historical. 

Is arranged according to states and 
with the same arrangement as to other 
things as file Xo. 1. These files contain 
clipping's, pictures, postal cards (scenic), 
descriptive and pictorial pamphlets and 
small folders and any other geographic- 
ally and historically descriptive material 
obtainable relating to cities, towns, vil- 
lages, hamlets, as well as some material 



158 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Los Angeles — Continued, 
of this sort on foreign countries. All 
newspaper and other clippings are first 
mounted on stiff paper, letter size with a 
binding margin, before being filed. 

Membership Historic File. 

This file contains material about our 
members and their ancestry and covers all 
information obtainable about each branch 
of their families as far back as it is pos- 
sible to trace them, and includes old wills, 
old deeds, old commissions, both military, 
naval and civil and other documents 
bearing upon the history of the member's 
ancestry and family. As this material 
accumulates sufficiently for an individual 
member or group of members it is bound 
into permanent form in uniform and 
standardized binding. As our members 
die or leave the society and enough 
material accumulates for those of names 
belonging under any one letter of the 
alphabet, it is bound in permanent form 
and classified under the letter of the 
alphabet to which it belongs, and the 
name of each person whose material is 
contained therein, is printed on the back 
of the volume. As additional volumes 
accumulate under any one letter of the 
alphabet, these volumes are numbered. 
They are attractively bound in uniform 
color and size and are kept in the files 
under lock and key for reference only. 

Genealogical Manuscript File. 

Our manuscript file contains genealog- 
ical material on families of every name 
obtainable. This file affords a means of 
preserving notes or manuscript prepared 
by the many persons who hope at some 
time to publish what they have gathered, 
but who find they are unable to do so. 
In some cases the material in this file is 
gathered from newspapers and other pub- 
lications. Such clippings are mounted 
on letter size paper leaving a binding 
edge so that it may be bound as it 
accumulates sufficiently later on. When 
enough of this genealogical material or 
any one family has been secured it is 
bound in standard binding and marked 
with the name of the family and kept in 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued, 
its alphabetical place in the manuscript 
file. 

Pamphlet Genealogy File. 
Our pamphlet genealogical file is di- 
vided into alphabetical sections, each sec- 
tion being large enough to contain suffi- 
cient number of pamphlets, to make, 
when bound, a volume of convenient size. 
When enough of these pamphlets are 
secured under any one letter of the 
alphabet they are bound uniformly in 
permanent form and placed on our 
shelves, each volume being marked with 
the title, "Miscellaneous Genealogies," 
with the letter of the alphabet under it, 
then the volume number. An alphabeti- 
cal list of all families bound into a vol- 
ume is lettered on the back of the 
volume, for convenience. Each volume 
of this class is bound in the same color. 

Scrap Books. 
The various scrap books which have 
been completed and also the current vol- 
umes in course of completion are a valu- 
able source of information and reference. 
The genealogical pages of the Boston 
Transcript from 1900 to date and almost 
a complete file of the same department 
of the Hartford Times, the Norwalk 
Hour and various other papers afford 
excellent genealogical reference. The 
vital statistics of Los Angeles, as they 
appear in the local papers, are preserved 
and kept up to date. The same informa- 
tion for Pasadena has been compiled and 
presented to the society in scrap books, 
all indexed. Other scrap books covering 
a wide range of subjects have been and 
are being compiled, among which are sev- 
eral on the World War and various his- 
torical subjects. 

Ruth Mooke, Office Manager. 

Franklin High School Library. 
Charles B. Moore, Prin. Viola Estelle 
Stevens, Lib'n. 

With a total of 51 teachers and 1105 
pupils, the high school library has in- 
creased to 3750 volumes. The average 
daily circulation is 125. We are plan- 
ning our permanent library which will be 
in the new building to be ready next fall. 
Viola Estelle Stevens, Lib'n. 



Vol. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



159 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pasadena. 

§|| Pasadena [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Jeannette M. Drake, Lib"n. 

The Children's Department moved into 
the new Boys' and Girls' Library Build- 
ing March 1. The building is of semi- 
colonial cottage type. The housing capac- 
ity is 15,000 volumes, the size of the 
main room is 40 by GO feet and it is 
decorated in colors of gray, orange and 
blue. 

An exhibit of twenty-one oil paintings 
of the California Art Club was exhibited 
in January. 

Dr John Miller spoke before the staff 
on Books on Psychology and Miss Helen 
E. Haines on Recent novels. 

Dr John Comstock, Director of the 
Southwest Museum, talked to members of 
the Butterfly Club February 13. 

Jeannette M. Drake, Lib'n. 

§ California Institute ok Tech- 
nology Library. Di Robert A. Milli- 
kan, C h a i r m a n Exec. Council. Miss 
Frances H. Spining, Lib'n. 

The sum of $300,000 was given to the 
California Institute of Technology yes- 
terday by Dr Norman Bridge. Of this, 
$££50,000 will be used for an extension to 
the recently completed Norman Bridge 
Laboratory and the remaining $50,000 
will be expended toward a scientific and 
technical library for the staff of the de- 
partment of physics. The library will 
also serve the departments of science and 
technology related to physics. It will be 
the plan to develop a library of physical 
science including the technical branches, 
which will serve all of Southern Califor- 
nia and which will be comparable in 
these subjects to such libraries as the 
John Crerar Library in Chicago. The 
plan is to expend $10,000 in purchases 
of scientific works during the coming- 
year and to set apart $40,000 as a per- 
manent endowment fund for this library. 
— Los Angeles Times, Mr 12 

Pomona. 

§|| Pomona [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

This season our concerts have been 
given in large part by persons not con- 
nected with the library staff. Some are 
2— 1S26S 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 
Pomona — Continued. 

musicians, some are just friends of the 
library who wish to share their favorite 
records with others, and make giving a 
library concert their contribution to com- 
munity joy. Each of the music dealers 
has been asked to contribute a concert. 
Often these have been of high grade. 
The accompanying lecture on the records 
played, or on types of phonograph and 
needle, or on technical matters seems 
to be as well enjoyed as the music itself. 
On February IS the library entertained 
the San Antonio Library Club. The 
speaker of the day was Miss Mary Arm- 
strong, of the English Department, Po- 
mona High School. She gave recollec- 
tions of her vacation trip in Europe. 
About forty were present for the meeting 
and the luncheon. 

The children of the David and Mar- 
garet Home were special guests of the 
library on March 23 and 30. These chil- 
dren have access only to a small library, 
so that when they came to our attractive 
juvenile room, and saw all the books and 
pictures, they were wildly delighted, and 
almost regretted the invitation to the 
music, the story-hour and the games. 
There is no record, however, that they 
regretted the ice cream cones. The older 
children were entertained by an ex-ranger 
from the Yellowstone National Park. 
He held them spellbound with his stories 
of herding buffalo, and counting elk, of 
bears that steal candy and wolves that 
slink after the traveler. 

At the suggestion of a local banker, 
we have set up a table for financial liter- 
ature, such as is issued by the federal 
reserve and other large banks, and by 
bond houses. This began in connection 
with Thrift Week. We have continued 
to display these monthly letters, however, 
and find them of value and interest. 
Other displays out of the ordinary were 
those of Chinese wood-carvings and of 
French and Italian railroad travel pos- 
ters. 

The library was represented at the 
Sixth District meeting by the librarian. 

To members of the staff, the outstand- 
ing news items of the quarter is the fact 
that four salaries were raised, each to 
$90. This is not a time when salary 



160 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Pomona — Continued. 

increases are frequently featured. But 
careful figuring showed that the budget 
would bear this much, and the Board 
was much pleased to make conditions 
better for the less well-paid workers. 
S. M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

Sierra Madre. 

Sierra Madre [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Elsie W. Rogers, Lib'n. 

Miss Minna M. Wolff has resigned her 
position as librarian here and has been 
appointed an assistant in the Los An- 
geles County Free Library. Her place 
is filled by Miss Elsie W. Rogers, who 
has had two years of practical experi- 
ence in the Pasadena Public Library and 
has spent six months in the Los Angeles 
Library Training School. — Sierra Madre 
News, Mr 10 

MADERA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh class.) 

County seat, Madera. 
Area, 2140 sq. mi. Pop. 12.203. 
Assessed valuation $22,464,890 (tax- 
able for county $19,098,855). 

Madera Co. Free Library, Madera. 
Miss Julia Steffa, Lib'n. 

Miss Mary Ella Glock, after an illness 
of many months, passed away on March 
6, 1922. Miss Glock had been librarian 
of the Madera County Free Library since 
1917 and under her administration the 
library prospered and developed and be- 
came a more vital factor in the lives of 
the people of the county. Her conscien- 
tious attention to duty, her unfailing 
courtesy and her wonderful optimism, 
made her much beloved and in her pass- 
ing the county has lost a capable officer 
and a loyal friend. 

Miss Julia Steffa, who has been acting 
librarian since September, 1921, was ap- 
pointed librarian on April 4, 1922. 

Julia Steffa, Lib'n. 



MARIN COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 

County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 27,342. 
Assessed valuation $26,608,602 (tax- 
able for county $24,142,775). 

San Quentin. 

San Quentin Prison Library. J. A. 
Johnston, W'arden. Rev Oliver C. Lai- 
zure. Chaplain - Director of Education. 
E. Northcott, Acting Lib'n. 

No books are delivered over the coun- 
ter. Men fill in a slip with the name 
and number of the book they are return- 
ing, and the names and numbers of sev- 
eral books they desire to read. One of 
these books is delivered by the library 
assistants, to the man's cell. Delivery 
days for the New Prison are Tuesday, 
Thursday, and Saturday ; and for the 
Old Prison are Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday. New Prison slips are pink. Old 
Prison, yellow. Magazines are handled 
the same way. Each man is allowed one 
book of science and one of fiction, to- 
gether with a magazine, every other day. 

The stock of books of all kinds con- 
sists of about 13,000' volumes, an increase 
of about lnOO over the last report. The 
entire collection is made up of donations 
from private sources, and discards from 
other libraries, which are always accept- 
able. The distribution amounts to about 
400 books and 300 magazines each day ; 
and the constant handling is shown in 
the worn condition of our most popular 
works. The bindery is giving good ser- 
vice, so we manage to keep the books in 
pretty fair shape. 

Our great need is for books that are 
up-to-date, especially in mechanics and 
all branches of science, from the elmen- 
tary to the most advanced. Many of the 
men leaving the institution are enabled 
to fill important positions through their 
studies. 

Through the kindness of some of the 
San Francisco news dealers and maga- 
zine publishers, we receive each month, 



vol. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



161 



MARIN CO.— Continued. 
San Quentin — Continued, 
a number of their turn - backs. Our 
magazine monthly circulation is approxi- 
mately SOCK). Our great need is for more 
scientific and mechanical publications. 

We are supplying our men working on 
the State Highways with books and 
magazines. This keeps up a steady drain 
on our stock as we have about 200 men 
employed there now. This number will 
probably be increased in the near future. 
If our boys are to go out equipped to 
fight a successful battle under a handi- 
cap, they must have plenty of good read- 
ing matter. We earnestly request that 
our friends remember us at every con- 
venient opportunity. 

All shipments should be sent care of 
the undersigned. 

Oliver C. Latzure, 
Chaplain-Director of Education. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third class.) 

County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 1580 sq. mi. Pop. 2775. 
Assessed valuation $5,286,386 (taxable 
for county $4,659,794). 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-eighth class.) 

County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3400 sq. mi. Pop. 24,116. 
Assessed valuation $29,886,216 (tax- 
able for county $26,437,472). 

MERCED COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh class.) 

County seat, Merced. 
Area,- 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 24,579. 
Assessed valuation $34,868,653 (tax- 
able for county $29,443,474). 

Merced Co. Free Library, Merced. 
Miss Winifred H. Bigley, Lib'n. 

At Livingston yesterday Governor Wil- 
liam D. Stephens broke ground for the 
new library and justice building. The 
building, a gift of Merced county to Liv- 
ingston, will be of hollow title and is so 
planned that the whole structure can 



MERCED CO. — Continued, 
later be used conveniently for library 
purposes. The county supervisors award- 
ed the contract to John Groom on his 
low bid of $9974.— Merced Star, Mr 23 

Livingston. 

Livingston Branch, Merced Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Merced Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Merced. 

Merced Free Public Library and 
Branch, Merced Co. Free Library. 
Miss Winifred II. Bigley, Lib'n. 

The estate of the late Sara Jane 
Thursby was settled in the superior court 
this morning. She died in February, 
1913, bequeathing most of her estate to 
Robert Gracey. He died in October, 
1913, leaving a will disposing of the 
Thursby bequest by giving half to the 
Presbyterian Board of Missions and half 
to the City of, Merced for a library. 
When the Gracey estate is settled, Mer- 
ced City will receive nearly $20,000 to 
add to its library fund. — Merced Sun, 
Mr 27 

MODOC COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second class.) 

County seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 5425. 
Assessed valuation $8,450,770 (taxable 
for county $S,030,S95). 

MONO COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh class.) 

County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 2796 sq. mi. Pop. 960. 
Assessed valuation $4,102,570 (taxable 
for county $2,140,815). 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 

( Twenty-fourth class. ) 

County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,9S0. 
Assessed valuation $46,316,112 (tax- 
able for county $39,916,474). 



162 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. f April, 1922 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 

Monterey Co. Free Library, Salinas. 
Miss Anne Haclden, Lib'n. 

Miss Birdice Blye, a pianist of interna- 
tional note, giving concerts in Salinas 
and Monterey during January, came with 
us on a branch visiting expedition Janu- 
ary 19. We showed her our different 
types of branches, explaining the service 
given by each, and she met custodians 
and teachers. She was very enthusiastic 
over her first impressions of county li- 
brary work. Miss Blye also attended the 
meeting of the Second District Califor 
nia Library Association at Palo Alto 
February 4. 

From February 22 to 25 Education 
and Music Week was observed in Salinas, 
with school exhibits, and programs each 
afternoon and evening. The County Li- 
brary had an exhibit covering all the 
obtainable maps of the county, the coast 
charts, photographs of local historic land- 
marks and other interesting features of 
the county. Many books were on dis- 
play ; books relating to industries carried 
on in the county, books helpful to teach- 
ers, books helpful to adults wishing to 
make up for lack of opportunity in edu- 
cation, books of use in Americanization, 
and the best recent books. At this fes- 
tival the county librarian gave two illus- 
trated talks on Monterey County and the 
work of the county library, using the 
new slides and additional ones borrowed 
from the State Library on library work 
in other counties. Miss Frink manipu- 
lated the splended new lantern, recently 
purchased by the Salinas Central Gram- 
mar School. 

The County Itinerants met March 28 
to reorganize. There was a good attend- 
ance, including the Farm Adviser and 
assistant, County Superintendent of 
Schools, Rural School Supervisor, Horti- 
cultural Commissioner, County Nurse 
and County Librarian. A profitable con- 
ference was held and arrangements made 
for a luncheon April 10 at which a pro- 
ject for the year is to be planned. 

Monterey County was represented at 
the Second District meeting California 
Library Association by Miss Jessie W. 
Nichols, Pacific Grove Public Library ; 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 
Mrs F. Y. Humphries and Miss Helen 
Ward of the Salinas Union High School ; 
Mrs Floyd Zoellin, Librarian at King 
City ; Mrs Wm. Head, Librarian at 
Scledad, and Ellen Frink and Anne Had- 
den of the Monterey County Library. 

The Monterey County Free Library 
has recently had a number of lantern 
slides made. These illustrate the work 
of the county library in Monterey Coun- 
ty and show interesting historic, natural 
and industrial features of the county. 

On March 9 the County Librarian at- 
tended the Community Center meeting 
at Corral de Tierra with the Assistant 
Farm Adviser and showed some of the 
new slides of the county. 

Mrs. H. Louise Mignon Schultzberg, 
County Superintendent of Schools, re- 
signed on March first and Mr James G. 
Force of Soledad was appointed to take 
her place. 

Anne Hadden. Lib'n. 

NAPA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-first class.) 

County seat, Napa. 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 20,078. 
Assessed valuation $21,095,190 (tax- 
able for county $21,532,590). 

Napa Co. Free Library, Napa. Miss 
Estella De Ford, Lib'n. 

Miss Ralpha Wilson and Miss Carol 
Breeding, assistants in the Napa County 
Free Library, were granted a leave of 
absence to attend the ten weeks course 
given by the Library Service School of 
Riverside. During their absence Miss 
Margaret Chiles and Miss Elizabeth Lees 
acted as substitutes. Miss Wilson and 
Miss Breeding returned March 20. Miss. 
Wilson was granted a $15 raise in salary, 
effective April 15. 

The State Hospital Branch has been 
reopened. Mr Royce, druggist at the 
State Hospital, has taken the books and 
reports a wide circulation among the at- 
tendants and the paroled patients. 

To serve a few individuals who could 
not reach the distant branches we have 
established a small branch at the Bryant 
ranch on the Monticello road. 



Vol. 17, 110. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



163 



NAPA CO. — Continued. 
We feel that we have satisfactorily 
solved the book-repair problem. Mrs Con- 
nolly, custodian of the Browns Valley 
Branch, spent several clays at the Oak- 
land Public Library in the book-repair 
department and also received help and 
suggestions at the Foster and Futernick 
Bindery. With this beginning she has 
been able to go ahead and is now doing- 
excellent repairing. We have found it 
more satisfactory to pay for this work 
by the hour, the repairing at present 
costing us about 20 cents, per volume, a 
figure which we hope to reduce. Books 
in which the sewing is broken or which 
are badly worn are not repaired but go. 
to the bindery. 

Estella De Ford, Lib'n. 

Bryant Ranch. 

Bryant Ranch Branch, Napa Co. 
Free Library, was established during 
the quarter. 

State Hospital (P. O. Imola; no exp. 
office). 

State Hospital Branch, Napa Co. 
Free Library, was re-established Feb- 
ruary 6, 1922, 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth class.) 

County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 982 sq. mi. Pop. 10,850. 
Assessed valuation $9,305,221 (taxable 
for county $0,990,475). 



Grass Valley. 

Grass Valley [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Frances Doom, Lib'n. 

The Grass Valley Public Library has 
received the gift of a complete set of 
the Encyclopedia Britannica, consisting 
of thirty volumes, from C. E. Clinch. 
Mr Clinch also presented a number of 
miscellaneous books of interest and value. 
— Grass Valley Union, F 16 



ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 

County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, 780 sq. mi. Pop. 61,375. 
Assessed valuation $128,569,920 (tax- 
able for county $115,729,185). 

Orange Co. Free Library, Santa 
Ana. Miss Margaret Livingston, Lib'n. 

The drives for records conducted by 
the California Federated Music Clubs re- 
sulted in our being able to place an order 
for two sets of the selections on the 
Club list. With a few other records 
given, we have a good start for our 
record collection, which is much appre- 
ciated and used by schools. Miss Don- 
zella Cross spoke to the Music Teachers' 
Club, and the January county meeting of 
Parent-Teacher Association. 

The Fourth District Parent-Teacher 
Association is offering a prize of $5 to 
the grammar school, and the same to 
the High School making the best collec- 
tion of wild flowers, specimens to be 
pressed, mounted, and identified at least 
by common name. Collections are to be 
sent to the County Library before May 
13, where they will be judged by a com- 
mittee appointed. The prize-winning col- 
lection will be taken to the State Con- 
vention of Parent-Teacher Associations 
as part of the District Exhibit. Reports 
indicate that one of the smallest rural 
schools may be a prize winner. 

An experiment is being tried with 
seven Farm Centers in communities 
where we have branch libraries. A short 
letter containing brief notes on a few 
books at the branch is sent to the Sec- 
retary to be read at the meeting. Some- 
times attention is called to an important 
article in one of the magazines regularly 
received at the branch. 

At La Habra the new building pur- 
chased by popular subscription and fitted 
for library use, is now occupied and is 
open every afternoon and three evenings 
a week. Well planned shelving has been 
put up on two sides of the room, and a 
reading table for the grown-ups, and a 



164 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



ORANGE CO.— Continued, 
cunning small one for the children, maga- 
zine rack and charging table, give the 
room a nicely furnished appearance, while 
pictures and mottoes have been chosen 
to adorn the walls. Since the Garden 
Grove Branch has moved into the Com- 
munity building, it has a real library 
atmosphere, but no additions to the col- 
lection of books fill the shelves any bet- 
ter, for the books are always out. This 
branch led in rate of circulation in 
March, reporting a circulation of 729 on 
212 books. At the El Toro school a 
Yictrola has been purchased and the pu- 
pils are enjoying records from the County 
Library. 

Miss Frances Stockebrand was appoint- 
ed assistant in the County Library, by 
the Supervisors March 14 and began 
work April first. 

Branches were established at Olinda 
crossroad, and in Laural school district. 
Makgaeet Livingston, Lib'n. 

El Toro. 

El Toro School Dist. Branch, Or- 
ange Co. Free Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Garden Grove. 

Garden Grove Branch, Orange Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

La Habra. 

La Habra Branch, Orange Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Laural School Dist. 

Laural School Dist. Branch, 
Orange Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished Feb. 13, 1922. 

The principal of the school having 
taught in Los Angeles County and being 
familiar with county library service, did 
not rest until the trustees voted to join. 
A large sugar factory employs many per- 
sons, and we expect the school to do good 
community work. 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Olinda (P. O. Fullerton, R. R.). 

Olinda Branch, Orange Co. Free 
Library, was established Jan. 3, 1922. 

This location is at the crossroad lead- 
ing into Olinda and the various oil leases, 
where many people pass each day. It 
marks a beginning of a service to a large 
group scattered over several miles of 
operated oil lands. We hope that an 
interest will develop to demand a larger 
branch. The branch has been located at 
a service station. 

Orange. 

Orange Free Public Library. Miss 
Claire Bonnell, Lib'n. 

Beginning January first a new sched- 
ule of hours went into effect. The li- 
brary is now open week days from 9 a.m. 
until 9 p.m. and Sundays from 2 until 
5 p.m. With longer hours it was nec- 
essary to have a third person on the staff 
and Miss Roberta Ingrum came from 
Riverside to fill this position. The li- 
brary patrons have been much pleased 
with the new hours and there has been a 
substantial gain in the use of the library, 
especially in reference work. 

A vacant room in the basement of the 
library has been fitted up with folding- 
chairs and a speaker's stand and will be 
used for clubs, committees and story 
hours. 

Claire Bonnell, Lib'n. 

Santa Ana. 

§Santa Ana Free Public Library. 
Miss Jeannette E. McFadden, Lib'n. 

Orange County Library Club. 

The first quarterly meeting for 1922 
of the Orange County Library Associa- 
tion was held at Santa Ana, on Febru- 
ary 25, in the Library of the Polytechnic 
High School. Miss Mary Harris of the 
High School Library, Miss Margaret Liv- 
ingston of the County Free Library, and 
Miss Jeannette E. McFadden of the 
Santa Ana Public Library were hostesses, 
and Miss Sarah Jacobus of the Pomona 
Public Library the honored guest and the 
principal speaker on the program. 



Vol. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



165 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
Santa Ana — Continued. 

The business meeting was given over to 
the election of the following officers foi 
the year : Mrs Margaret G. Scott, presi- 
dent ; Mrs Olive Bailey, vice president ; 
Miss Ruth Ellis, secretary-treasurer. 

The program consisted of an interest- 
ing and helpful talk by Miss Jacobus on 
the work of the San Antonio Library 
Club ; and of a general discussion, led by 
Miss Livingston, of the work of the 
newly established Orange County Free 
Library. 

At the close of the program the mem- 
bers and guests present were invited to 
proceed to Miss Harris's home on Cy- 
press street, where tables had been set 
for a dainty luncheon. 

The Club has gladly accepted an invi- 
tation to meet in Orange early in May. 
as guests of Miss Claire Bonnell of the 
Orange Public Library, and Mrs Mar- 
garet G. Scott of the Orange Union High 
School Library. 

Ruth Ellis, Sec. 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty-second class.) 

County seat, Auburn. 
Area, 1484 sq. mi. Pop. 18,584. 
Assessed valuation $18,506,624 (tax- 
able for county $12,842,330). 

Auburn. 

|| Auburn Free Public Library. Mrs 
Madeline Kriechbaum, Lib'n. 

We have tried the experiment of omit- 
ting fines on all over-due books, for 10 
days, just to get the books back to the 
library. So far it has been a success ; 
many books came back that we gave up 
as lost. One had been out for 10 years. 
Madeline Kriechbaum, Lib'n. 

Lincoln. 

Lincoln Free Public Library. Mrs 
Bertha C. Landis, Lib'n. 

An entertainment, given here recently 
by local talent, will net us $225 for the 
purchase of books. Our book circula- 
tion for the past quarter was 2874, and 
our periodical 110. 

Bertha C. Landis, Lib'n. 



PLACER CO.— Continued. 
Roseville. 

Roseville [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Georgiana R. Willits, Lib'n. 

Daily attendance of magazine and 
newspaper readers has increased three- 
fold, in the past one and a half years. 
This increase has come about gradually 
and encourages one to feel that the li- 
brary is "coming into its own" as a 
part of the educational and recreational 
life of the community. Circulation of 
books has gone up to 6526 for the past 
quarter, and that of magazines to 234. 
Georgiana R. Willits, Lib'n. 

PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 

County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5681. 
Assessed valuation $21,220,247 (tax- 
able for county $15,262,308). 

Plumas Co. Free Library, Quincy. 
Miss Carmelita Duff, Lib'n. 

The opening of a number of schools in 
the county which ordinarily begin in 
March was delayed on account of deep 
snow late in the season. In spite of 
difficulties of transportation, the county 
library has succeeded in getting books to 
the schools. 

Fred Strickland is substituting at head- 
quarters for Robert Young, who was 
operated on for appendicitis in February. 
Carmelita Duff, Lib'n. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 

County seat, Riverside. 
Area, 7008 sq. mi. Pop. 50.297. 
Assessed valuation $50,837,731 (tax- 
able for county $38,679,370). 

Riverside. 

§|| Riverside [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Lillian L. Dickson, Acting Lib'n. 

The recently completed addition to the 
Riverside Public Library was officially 
opened to the public with a reception on 
the afternoon of February 25. There 
was no formal program but the hundreds 
of people who called were welcomed by 



166 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Riverside — Continued, 
the Library Board, the staff of the li- 
brary and the teachers and students of 
the library school, and escorted through 
the various departments. The rooms were 
beautifully decorated with spring flowers 
and sprays of acacia, and an orchestra 
and light refreshments added materially 
to the hospitable greetings. 

The new east addition, 55 by 30' feet, 
with light and airy basement underneath, 
was the center of interest. It houses 
the reference room and several special 
collections, among them the Ethan Allen 
Chase collection, the John Correja col- 
lection and a collection of rare Bibles. 
The library has grown from 1000 vol- 
umes in 1889 to 90,000 volumes in 1922. 
A portrait of the beloved former libra- 
rian, Joseph F. Daniels, who had planned 
and was supervising the erection of this 
new addition at the time of his death in 
September, 1021, occupied a conspicuous 
place in the reference room and was 
silently greeted by the many friends who 
missed his genial presence. 

The much needed new addition to the 
library was made possible in 1921 by the 
gift of $25,000 from the Carnegie Cor- 
poration, the original building being the 
gift of Andrew Carnegie to the city, 
with additional contributions from the 
prominent citizens of Riverside. Condi- 
tional with the Carnegie gift the city of 
Riverside purchased in 1921, for the use 
of the library school, two adjoining resi- 
dences. 

Miss Sarah Patterson, formerly of the 
University of Illinois Library and for the 
past two years on the staff of the River- 
side Public Library, has been appointed 
assistant librarian in the University of 
California, Southern Branch, Los An- 
geles. 

Riverside Library Service School. 

The summer session of the Riverside 
Library Service School will begin June 
26 and continue for six weeks. Teachers 
and subjects are as follows : Theresa 
Hitchler, Cataloging and classification ; 
Edna Whiteman, Children's literature 
and story-telling ; Artena Chapin, Book 
selection and Library administration ; 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Riverside — Continued. 
Lillian L. Dickson, Reference and docu- 
ments ; Alice M. Butterfield, The high 
school library and Library law ; Mabel 
F. Faulkner, Binding, repair and library 
handicraft and Periodicals and serials. 
The tuition fee is $30. An additional 
fee of $2 is charged for catalog cards. 

Miss Ina Forrest Nelson, student and 
teacher in the Riverside Library Service 
School, cataloger in the Riverside Public 
Library, and later librarian at Oxford 
University, Miami, Ohio, is now em- 
ployed as cataloger in Leland Stanford, 
Jr., University Library. Three members 
of the Riverside '22 class have been 
placed in Southern California libraries, 
Miss Alice B. Fowler in the Alhambra 
Public Library, Miss Frances Stocke- 
brand in Orange County Free Library at 
Santa Ana and Miss Nellie G. Rowe in 
Imperial County Free Library at El 
Centro. Miss Edris Powlison, Riverside 
'16, was married February 11, to Mr 
Clifford Backstrand. They will make 
their home in San Francisco. Miss 
Blanche G. Emery, Riverside '19, assist- 
ant in the University of Southern Cali- 
fornia Library, Los Angeles, was married 
March 7, to G. B. Emery. They will 
make their home in Yakima, Washington. 

Lillian L. Dickson, Acting Lib'n. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 

County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 988 sq. mi. Pop. 90,978. 
Assessed valuation $133,003,882 (tax- 
able for county $112,253,954). 

Sacramento Co. Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, 
Lib'n. 

A new branch was opened in Colonial 
Heights, a suburb of Sacramento, Feb- 
ruary 1. The branch is located in a 
small building which was erected for the 
purpose, and which is leased by the Sac- 
ramento County Free Library. The 
room, although small, is tastefully fur- 
nished and pleasant, and Mrs H. W. 
Levers has been appointed as custodian. 
The branch was opened by a reception 
given by the Fruitridge Parent-Teacher 



Vol. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



167 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 
Association to the public, and was well 
attended. The County Librarian spoke 
upon the Sacramento County Free Li- 
brary, with special reference to the 
Colonial Heights Branch, and Mrs May 
Dexter Henshall of .the State Library 
gave an outline of the county library 
work in the" state. Refreshments were 
served by the hostesses, and many books 
issued during the afternoon. 

On March 22 a branch was established 
in the Natomas district, in the home of 
Mrs G. M. Gooding, who acts as custo- 
dian without compensation. This is a 
branch which has been greatly needed, 
but for which it has not been heretofore 
possible to secure a location, and the 
County Librarian is deeply appreciative 
of Mrs Gooding's generosity in accepting 
and caring for the books. 

Bruceville Branch was discontinued 
during the quarter. 

During the quarter, the County Li- 
brarian has made 19 visits to branches, 
and has delivered the following addresses : 
"The County Free Library System, and 
how it is applied in Sacramento County" 
at Hagginwood Parent-Teacher Associa- 
tion, March 10 ; "Literature as an inspira- 
tion in living" at Orangevale Study Club, 
March 14 ; "How to use a library," at 
San Juan Union High .School, March 28. 
Cornelia D. Provines, Lib'n. 

Bruceville (P. O. Elk Grove, R. R. 1; 
exp. Elk Grove). 

Bruceville Branch, Sacramento Co. 
Free Library, was discontinued Feb. 
20, 1922. 

Colonial Heights (P. O. Sacramento, 
R. R. 4, Box 588; no exp. office). 

Colonial Heights Branch, Sacra- 
mento Co. Free Library, was established 
Feb. 1, 1922. 

Natomas (P. O. Sacramento, Motor R. 

A, Box 1850; no exp. office). 

Natomas Branch, Sacramento Co. 
Free Library, was established March 22, 
1922. 



SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty-third class.) 

County seat, Hollister. 
Area, 1470 sq. mi. Pop. 8995. 
Assessed valuation $14,250,227 (taxable 
for county $12,730,850). 

San Benito Co. Free Library, Hol- 
lister. Mrs Ora M. Regnart, Lib'n. 

The librarian attended a meeting of the 
Second District of the California Library 
Association held in the Community House 
at Palo Alto, February 4. 

At a recent meeting of the Farm Bu- 
reau Directors the librarian gave a talk 
on the advantages of the County Library. 
We are advertising the County Library 
in the Farm Bureau Monthly. Every 
member of the Farm Bureau receives 
this paper. 

A branch was established at the West 
Side Farm Bureau Center. The meet- 
ings are held in a fruit warehouse and 
the books will be kept there for the con- 
venience of those attending the meetings. 
The librarian is a member of this center. 
Ora M. Regnart, Lib'n. 

West Side Farm Bureau Center. 

West Side Farm Bureau Center 
Branch, San Benito Co. Free Li- 
brary, was established during the quar- 
ter. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 

County seat, San Bernardino. 
Area. 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. 73401. 
Assessed valuation $89,511,779 (tax- 
able for county $54,161,950). 

San Bernardino Co. Free Library, 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
Waters, Lib'n. 

As a result of the campaign for music 
records for the rural communities and 
rural schools, the County Free Library- 
has received from the city of Redlands, 
through the efforts of the Redlands Music 
Teachers' Association, and the Spinet 
Club, 100 records with a few more to 
come in that have been ordered as they 
wished to give the complete suggested 



168 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

list of records as listed by the California 
Federation of Music Clubs. The County 
Parent - Teacher Association did some 
work for the campaign but its final re- 
port has not been sent in. 

The Yucaipa Branch of the County 
Free Library was transferred to its new 
room in the Yucaipa Woman's Club 
House March 14 and opened to the pub- 
lic March 15. The room was an addition 
to the Club House, built especially for 
library purposes by the Yucaipa commu- 
nity and cost $1,500. It is about 22 by 
22 feet in size. The Community Club 
House is not yet quite completed but is 
a beautiful building, costing over $10,000. 
The County Free Library furnished the 
library room complete including shelv- 
ing and on opening day had an attrac- 
tive array of new books and mounted pic- 
tures on display. The circulation has- 
quadrupled during the last month, which 
shows the interest taken in the new 
building and new quarters. 

A branch was established at Santa 
Ana Power House No. 2 with Thomas 
C. Kehoe as custodian, March 15. Sev- 
eral branches have been discontinued : 
El Mirage, March 9; Harlem Springs in 
February ; Westend, March 16. The 
branch at Lucerne Valley was discon- 
tinued in February and this general 
branch consolidated with Midway School. 
The new branch is called Midway 'and 
School. The teacher, Miss Irene Boyd, 
is the custodian. The branch at Mirage 
Valley School was withdrawn in March 
as the school has been suspended for this 
school year. 

Mrs M. E. Igo is the new custodian at 
our branch at the main building of the 
County Hospital, having taken charge 
February 1, 1922. Mr Rogers is the new 
custodian at the branch at the Tubercu- 
lar Ward, having taken charge there 
December 15, 1921. The Oro Grande 
Branch is now open from 5 to 6.30 p.m. 
on Tuesday and Thursday, and from 2.80 
to 4 p.m. on Saturday. 

Caroline S. Waters, Lib'n. 

San Bernardino Co. Hospital 
Branch, San Bernardino Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

San Bernardino Co. Hospital, 
Tubercular Ward Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 



El Mirage (Exp. Victorville). 

El Mirage Branch, San Bernar- 
dino Co. Free Library, was discontin- 
ued March 9, 1922. 

Harlem Springs. 

Harlem Springs Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library, was discon- 
tinued in February, 1922. 

Lucerne Valley (Exp. Victorville). 

Lucerne Valley Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Mirage Valley School Dist. (P. O. El 

Mirage; exp. Victorville). 

Mirage Valley School Dist. Branch, 
San Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Oro Grande (P. X). Halleck; exp. Oro 
Grande). 

Oro Grande Branch, San Bernar- 
dino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Redlands. 

A. K. Smiley [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Gwendolyn M. Tinker, Act- 
ing Lib'n. 

Mrs F. W. Sanborn (nee Elizabeth 
Lowry), Librarian, resigned from her 
position March 15, and has gone to 
Seattle, Washington, with her husband, 
where he is completing some studies at 
the University of Washington. Miss 
Gwendolyn M. Tinker has been made 
Acting Librarian. 

Miss Alice R. Mead completed her ap- 
prenticeship course February 15, and 
has been taken on the staff as one of the 
assistants in the Circulation Department. 



Vol. 17, 110. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



169 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Red lands — Continued. 
April 4 a meeting was held in honor 
of Mr Kirke H. Field, President of the 
Board of Trustees, who has served on 
the board for twenty-five years. The 
meeting was held at the time set for the 
regular monthly board meeting and was 
a complete surprise to Mr Field. About 
thirty guests were present, including Mr 
and Mrs Daniel Smiley, the City Trust- 
ees, representatives of leading organi- 
zations of the city and friends of Mr 
Field, in addition to the Library Board 
and members of the library staff. Sena- 
tor Lyman M. King of the Library 
Board, presided and called on several 
who responded with remarks appropriate 
to the occasion, expresing their apprecia- 
tion of Mr Field's services and of the 
esteem in which he is held. 

Gwendolyn M. Tinker, 

Acting Lib'n. 

Santa Ana Power House No. 2 (P. O. 

East Highlands, care Southern Cali- 
fornia Edison Co.). 

Santa Ana Power House No. 2 
Branch, San Bernardino Co. Free 
Library, was established March 15, 1922. 

Westend. 

Westend Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library, was discontinued 
March 16, 1922. 



Yucaipa. 

Yucaipa Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 



SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 

County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 112,248. 
Assessed valuation $90,434,293 (tax- 
able for county $80,936,802). 

San Diego Co. Free Library, San 
Diego. Miss Eleanor Hitt, Lib*n. 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
Branches were established in Fallbrook 
and Spring Hill school districts during 
the quarter. 

Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

Fallbrook (No exp. office). 

Fallbrook School Dist. Branch, 
San Diego Co. Free Library, was es- 
tablished Feb. IS, 1922. 

National City. 

Sweetwater Union High School Li- 
brary. Guy Hudgins, Prin. Mrs Fanny 

Taylor, Lib'n. 

The library is now located in its new 
quarters in the fine new $175,000 high 
school building. It is a large room on 
the second floor of the main building, 
with five windows facing east. The En- 
glish and History recitation rooms ad- 
join the library at either end. There 
are book shelves on two sides of the. 
room and as the number of books in- 
creases the third wall will also be utilized. 
We have ten oak veneer tables accom- 
modating four students each. The Man- 
ual Training Department made the oak 
magazine rack and a fine sturdy book- 
truck. 

Fanny Taylor, Lib'n. 

San Diego. 

:|:§San Diego [Free] Public Library. 
Mrs H. P. Davison, Lib'n Emeritus ; 
Miss Althea H. Warren, Lib'n. 

The annual report for 1922 shows a 
circulation of 775,142 books, which is an 
increase of 14 per cent over 1921, a 
better annual advance than has been 
made any year since 1918. The main 
library carries over half of this work, 
the deposits, a sixth ; and the five 
branches, the remaining third. Fiction 
is the most popular type of reading, con- 
stituting 53.7 per cent of the total adult 
circulation and followed by current 
periodicals, history, sociology, literature, 
fine arts, useful arts, science, philosophy, 
languages and religion, used in the order 
listed. The books purchased this year 
numbered 7506, at an average of $1.39, 



170 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 
San Diego — Continued, 
which is twenty cents more per book 
than last year. The method of collecting 
delinquent books by automobile has been 
copied from the experiment of the public 
library in Washington, D. C. Miss Van 
Wagenen of the Business Department, 
used in November twelve hours of her 
time at a value of 66f cents per hour, 
$3.50 in automobile mileage at 7 cents 
a mile to secure books to the value of 
$37.50 and fines to the amount of $3.98, 
which saved the library approximately 
$30, not to mention the satisfaction of 
"pushing the logic of a fact," in the 
shape of an overdue notice, to "its ulti- 
mate conclusion in unmitigated act." 

Miss Cecil Bernardis, librarian of the 
Mission Hills Branch, was married Feb- 
ruary 10 to Claude Walbreck, of San 
Diego. She is continuing on the library 
staff this year. Mrs Carrie V. Hinkle. 
who has been librarian of the Pacific 
Beach Branch since it wa-s opened in 
1013, resigned her post February 28, and 
has gone east to visit her daughter. Her 
place has been filled by the appointment 
of Mrs Lucy P. Woodward, of Pacific 
Beach. 

A three-year lease has been sigued for 
reading-room quarters on the second floor 
of a new building now being erected at 
the corner of Eighth and E streets. This 
will give the reading room and children's 
department new aud commodious rooms, 
available June 1, and prove a very satis- 
factory change from the present quarters. 

Miss Mary Van Wagenen, head of the 
Documents Department, was confined to 
her home for nearly a month during 
March and April, with diphtheria. Al- 
though a light case, it caused a little 
flurry of alarm until the Health Depart- 
ment returned negative reports on exam- 
inations of the rest of the staff. 

Miss- Warren, librarian, Miss Brink, 
of the catalog department, and Miss Van 
Wagenen, of the documents department, 
attended the meeting of the Sixth Dis- 
trict in Santa Barbara on January 7. 

The library tax appropriation for 
1922, passed by the city council, is for 
$01,460.50. The total is 6.68 mills on 
each dollar of tax valuation, an increase 



SAN DIEGO CO.— Continued. 

San Diego — Continued. 

of .48 mills over 1921, and .68 mills 

more than the minimum prescribed by 

the city charter. 

Several members of the staff have 
availed themselves of the opportunity of 
attending a class in story-telling held 
during March by Mrs Ritza Freeman 
Reardon. Mrs Reardon is an artist in 
the work, and has been an inspiration 
to all who have heard her. 

Althea H. Warren, Lib'n. . 

Spring Hill School Dist. (P. O. Ra- 

mona; no exp. office). 

Spring Hill School Dist. Branch, 
San Diego Co. Free Library, was es- 
tablished Feb. 20, 1922. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 

City and county coterminous. 
Area, 43 sq. mi. Pop. 506,676. 
Assessed valuation $869,187,114 (tax- 
able for county $609,8S4,624). 

California Genealogical Society 
Library. Mr L. D. Thornbury, Pres. 
Miss Sarah Louise Kimball, Sec. Mi- 
Henry Byron Phillips, Lib'n. 

Since the last number of News Notes, 
the California Genealogical Society hai> 
received, in addition to current purchases 
and deposits, the genealogical collections 
of two of our deceased members, each 
containing considerable valuable material : 
That of Thomas Edward Bond, presented 
by his son, Mr John A. Bond ; and that 
of William E. Loy. presented by his 
relict. Mrs Mary Rose Loy, both of 
Berkeley, California. 

At the annual meeting of stockholders 
there was created a committee known as 
a Library Promotion Committee, and it 
is expected to function as a standing 
committee responsive to the following- 
resolution adopted at this meeting. Re- 
solved : That a standing committee con- 
sisting of five members, to be kDown as 
the Library Promotion Committee, whose 
general duties shall be as indicated by 
its name, be appointed ; and that when 
appointed, said committee shall be re- 



Vol. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



171 



San Francisco — Continued, 
commended to compile a list of publica- 
tions suitable for the purposes of this 
society, and which are not now in its 
library, nor in the California State Li- 
brary, nor in the San Francisco Public 
Library, together with an approximate 
cost of same laid down on the premises 
of the Sutro Branch of the California 
State Library in San Francisco ; and 
that such lists shall extend to from 
$4,000 to .$.1,000 in real value; that the 
State Librarian and the Library Com- 
mittee of the San Francisco Public Li- 
brary be both approached with an offer 
that if the State of California and the 
City of San Francisco would each meet 
one-third the cost of such material, that 
this Society would bind itself to raise 
the other one-third of such sum. Avoid- 
ing by this method a duplication of 
material, and a resulting saving of in- 
vested funds, as under the working- agree- 
ment between this society and the Cali- 
fornia State Library, all such material 
would be available to the general public 
free of cost, regardless of ownership, it 
being understood that one-third of tha 
material so secured be deposited in the 
San Francisco Public Library ; and two- 
thirds in the Sutro Branch of the Cali- 
fornia State Library in San Francisco. 

This committee has been appointed and 
has organized with Dr Charles Francis 
Griffin as chairman, and Mrs Avis Yates 
Brownlee as secretary ; the other mem- 
bers are, George Henry Andruss (ex- 
officio), Henry Byron Phillips and John 
Howell. 

Henry Byron Phillips, Lib'n. 

St. Andrew's Society Library. Geo. 
St. J. Bremner, Sec. 

Some months ago a committee was ap- 
pointed by St. Andrew's Society to go 
over the library and purchase such books 
of purely Scottish interest as were lack- 
ing. Recently about 50 volumes of the 
first purchase were received and placed 
on our shelves. Chief among them are a 
series of county histories, written by men 
who are thoroughly conversant with the 
localities, traditions and people of the 
various counties of Scotland. 

A number of other interesting and 
scarce books have been received, and 



San Francisco — Continued, 
others have been ordered. A supplemen- 
tary catalog will be issued in the near 
future. 

Geo. St. J. Bremner, Sec. 

Sutro Branch, California State 
Library. Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Lib'n. Mrs Laura Steffens Suggett, 
Branch Lib'n. 

During the quarter, in addition to the 
publishers' deposits which come in regu- 
larly each month, a supplementary de- 
posit was received from the Harr Wag- 
ner Publishing Co., bringing that collec- 
tion up to date from 1017. Several new 
San Francisco publishers have begun 
depositing. 

To the California Genealogical Society 
collection which is in the custody of the 
Sutro Branch, was added as a gift by 
Mrs Mary Rose Loy, the private genea- 
logical library of her late husband, Mr 
William E. Loy. The collection has sev- 
eral greatly needed general genealogical 
reference books besides quite a little new 
material on Pennsylvania and North 
Carolina. It was used in tracing a 
Scotch-Irish line from the old country 
to Pennsylvania and afterward through 
Virginia and North Carolina to Ken- 
tucky and Tennessee. 

Since the Sutro Branch has been 
opened for research work, many have 
wanted to know what there is in the col- 
lections in the different foreign languages. 
The work of making these files for the 
catalog was finished about the middle of 
January. It will now be a very simple 
matter to keep up the files. 

One hundred and thirty-five additional 
volumes of Sutro Library newspapers 
were received back from the State Li- 
brary in bound form. These files are a 
most valuable addition to San Francisco 
historical material and are referred to 
constantly. 

Additions to the Sutro Library in the 
way of pictures and manuscripts were 
turned over in February by Mrs Emma 
L. Merritt from Sutro Heights. One 
item is especially important, being the 
original manuscript of the deed from 
the United States General Land Office 
for the San Miguel Rancho, signed by 
James Buchanan, March 30, 1S57, giv- 



172 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



San Francisco — Continued, 
ing the land to Jose de Jesus Noe. Be- 
sides the six pages of the deed which 
minutely describe the survey, there is a 
map which seems to clear up easily many 
points that were in question in reference 
to the boundaries of this early rancho. 

In San Francisco, on March 13, 
occurred the death of Mr Edgar Sutro, 
one of the donors of the Sutro Library 
to the State of California. 

Lauka Steffens Suggett, 

Branch Lib'n. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 

County seat, Stockton. 
Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 79,905. 
Assessed valuation $110,791,099 (tax- 
able for county $97,593,686). 

San Joaquin Co. Free Library, 
Stockton. H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. Miss 
Ida E. Condit, in charge. 

A community branch has been estab- 
lished at Nile Garden in charge of Mrs 
Mary Kissinger. 

H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. 

Nile Garden. 

Nile Garden Branch, San Joaquin 
Co. Free Library, was established dur- 
ing the quarter. 

Stockton. 

$§ Stockton Free Public Library. 
H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. 

The stamping of borrowers' cards has 
been discontinued. Hereafter they are 
to serve as identification cards only, 
which borrowers are required to carry 
with them. The dating of book cards 
has also been discontinued, as it has been 
found that the date guides themselves 
in the charging tray are sufficient indi- 
cation. This leaves only two steps in 
charging: (1) Writing borrower's num- 
ber on book card, and (2) Dating book 
pocket. As a result, not only is charg- 
ing speeded up, but a saving in both 
work and material is effected, since pock- 
ets, book cards, and borrowers' cards are 
used up only half as fast as formerly. 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued. 
More space has been gained for hand- 
ling books, and charging trays have been 
brought within easy sweep of the arm 
by means of a specially made metal tray- 
table with swivel wheels, placed at right 
angles to the charging desk and at the 
side of the assistant who is discharging. 
By means of the swivels, the table may 
be quickly and easily swung about with- 
in its own diameter. This enables an 
extra worker, especially during busy 
periods, to work at the trays without 
conflicting with the regular desk assist- 
ant. The entire area occupied by table 
with trays is only 2J square feet. 

Two thousand post cards are being 
mailed to the homes of children. One 
side of card has a photo of the Young 
People's Room in action. The opposite 
side is mimeographed with a miniature, 
pictorial map, showing the library and 
its street location. A sign-post pointing 
down Hunter street reads, "To Good 
Books." E. Market street is labelled 
"Road to Bookdom." A sign-post at the 
juncture of these streets, where the build- 
ing is located, commands "Stop at this 
corner." At the entrance, the directions 
say, "To find good stories, enter here." 
Above the building (which is marked 
"Free Public Library"), is this explan- 
ation : "Here are books to take home." 
These cards are sent as "Follow ups" 
of letters sent out earlier in the year. 
The letters, which were keyed, brought 
a direct return of 10 per cent in new 
borrowers, while the indirect return, 
which could not be keyed, is believed to 
be much greater. 

H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. 

Following a brief illness, Miss Kath- 
erine Ellen Orr, head of the catalog 
department of the Stockton Free Public 
Library, passed away yesterday morning. 
Miss Orr came to California from Maine 
in 1906 and shortly afterwards entered 
the library. — Stockton Record, F 27 

|| Stockton High School Library. 
Noel H. Garrison, Prin. Miss Mildred 
Smith, Lib'n. 

Miss Mildred Smith took the place of 
Mrs Inez Henderson Pond as librarian 
some time ago. 



Vol. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



173 



SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 

County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3500 sq. mi. Pop. 21,893. 
Assessed valuation $36,161,472 (tax- 
able for county $31,916,037). 

San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, 
San Luis Obispo. Miss Flo A. Gantz, 
Lib'n. 

Geneseo, New, Olmstead and Pecho 
schools have been added to the County 
Library during the quarter. 

Mr J. W. Noble, custodian of the 
Avila Branch, has resigned and Mrs Nels 
Jensen has been appointed to the posi- 
tion. 

Atascadero Branch has been moved 
into the new room in the new Commu- 
nity building after long months of pa- 
tient waiting. It is a beautiful room 
with its opalescent finishings, its French 
windows, its tiled fireplace, and its pil- 
lared concrete porch, which will serve as 
an out - door reading room in warm 
weather. We have put in many days in 
arranging and placing it in order and 
will still need to put in many more. The 
library is now open on Friday evening — 
movie night — and is proving very satis- 
factory. 

The librarian and first assistant, Miss 
Mary Kent, Miss Thelma Brackett, Li- 
brarian of Siskiyou county, and Mrs E. 
L. Kellogg, Librarian of the San Luis 
Obispo Public Library, attended the 
Sixth District meeting of the California 
Library Association held in Santa Bar- 
bara January 7. The trip was made in 
the county library automobile and was 
a delightful occasion in spite of the rain. 
Flo A. Gantz, Lib'n. 

Atascadero. 

Atascadero Branch, San Luis 
Obispo Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Luis Obispo Co. 
Free Library. 

Avila. 

Avila Branch, San Luis Obispo Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Luis Obispo Co. 
Free Library. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO CO.— Continued. 

Geneseo School Dist. (P. O. Linne ; no 

exp. office ) . 

Geneseo School Dist. Branch, San 
Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was es- 
tablished in February, 1922. 

New School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Santa Margarita). 

New School Dist. Branch, San 
Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was es- 
tablished in February, 1922. ■ 

Olmstead School Dist. (P. O. Har- 
mony; no exp. office). 

Olmstead School Dist. Branch, 
San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, 
was established in January, 1922. 

Pecho School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
San Luis Obispo). 

Pecito School Dist. Branch, San 
Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, was 
established in March, 1922. 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Luis Obispo Free Public Li- 
brary. Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

Miss Marie Hall has resigned her posi- 
tion as assistant and Mrs C. E. Rea, 
substitute, is serving until the position 
is filled. 

March was the busiest, month in the 
history of the library, the circulation 
exceeding all records. 

Abbie S. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 

County seat, Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 36,7S1. 
Assessed valuation $39,064,733 (tax- 
able for county $35,915,569). 

San Mateo Co. Free Library, Red- 
wood City. Miss Edna Holroyd, Lib'n. 

Miss Lalla Bedford, assistant in this 
library, has returned after a three 
months' leave of absence, spent at her 
home in Caldwell, Idaho. She tells of a 
growing desire for county library service 
in that state, and of being asked to give 



174 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



SAN MATEO CO.— Continued, 
talks to several clubs and other organi- 
zations on the subject of her work in 
California. . 

A branch was established at Lomita 
Park January 17, with Mrs Nellie R. 
Hunter as custodian. A library room 
has been fitted up in the basement of 
the schoolhouse. The hours are 2 to 4 
on Tuesday and Saturday afternoons. 
This little branch, an outgrowth of the 
Lomita Park School Branch, is showing 
circulation returns which are gratifyingly 
large. Many of the borrowers had for- 
merly gone to Colma and Daly City, a 
distance of five miles, for their books, 
so they appreciate the nearness of this. 
Edna Holroyd, Lib*n. 

Lomita Park. 

Lomita Park Branch, San Mateo 
Co. Free Library, was established Jan- 
uary 17, 1922. 

San Mateo. 

San Mateo Free Public Library. 
Miss Inez M. Crawford, Lib'n. 

The library has been the recipient of 
a number of courtesies this year. One 
friend gave our book fund $100. Mr A. 
P. Giannini sent to Italy for a number 
of Italian classics for our Italian readers, 
another has given from time to time a 
number of valuable late books, notably 
about $C0 worth of recently published 
biography. There have been the usual 
number of small gifts. 

Inez M. Crawford, Lib*n. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 

County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 41,097. 
Assessed valuation $56,934,231 (tax- 
able for county $49,252,150). 

Santa Barbara. 

Society of Natural History Li- 
brary. T. Gertrude Williamson, Cura- 
tor. 

The museum collections and library 
of the society have been presented to the 
State Teachers College here. It is now 



SANTA BARBARA CO.— Continued. 
Santa Barbara — Continued, 
being installed, the books have been 
arranged according to subject matter, and 
the Government publications in series. 
These will be cataloged and so made 
accessible to the students and teachers 
of the college, and to visitors of the 
museum. 

The Government publications of the 
current year have been received, and we 
are about to order new books of refer- 
ence for the various departments of the 
museum. 

Our aim is to make the museum and 
its library a centre of real educational 
value to the community. 

T. Gertrude Williamson, 

Curator. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 

County seat, San Jose. 
Area. 1355 sq. mi. Pop. 100,588'. 
Assessed valuation $115,933,819 (tax- 
able for county $90,497,995). 

San Jose. 

State Teachers College Library. 
Dr W. W. Kemp, Pres. Miss Helen 
Evans, Lib'n. 

With the growth of the school, it has 
become necessary to keep the library 
open more hours per day. The time has 
been extended so that the schedule reads : 
from S a.m. to 9.30 p.m. for five days of 
the week ; from 9 a.m. to p.m. on Sat- 
urday ; and from 2 to 6 p.m. on Sunda3\ 
In order to meet this situation, we now 
have two student assistants besides the 
librarian and assistant librarian. These 
student helpers take care of the night 
schedule, Saturday afternoon, and the 
Sunday work. 

The course in Library Technique, a 
required course given by the librarian, 
has been running with classes filled to 
capacity. The benefits of this course are 
already apparent in the way in which the 
library is used by the students. An ad- 
vanced course, limited to two or three 
students a quarter and consisting prin- 
cipally of practice work in the library, 
is also given. 



Vol. 17, no. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



175 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 

San Jose — Continued. 
A copy, in plaster, of the Victory of 
Samothraee was presented to the library 
by the March, 1922, graduating class, 
and adds much to the beauty of the read- 
ing room. 

Helen Evans, Lib'n. 

Santa Clara. 

University of Santa Clara Library. 
T. L. Murphy, S. J., Pres. Joseph Sasia, 
S. J., Lib'n. 

Congressman Arthur M. Free, repre- 
sentative of this Eighth District, has 
lately presented to this University 129 
volumes, elegantly bound, which contain 
a record of the Union and Confederate 
armies of the war of the rebellion. This 
is a certainly valuable addition to our 
department of L T nited States History.. 
Joseph Sasia, S. J., Lib'n. 

Stanford University. 

:|:§||Leland Stanford Junior Uni 
versity Library. Dr Bay Lyman Wil- 
bur, Pres. .George T. Clark, Lib'n. 

Stanford University Library has taken 
over the administration of the floover 
War Library which heretofore has been 
entirely under the direction of Professors 
E. D. Adams and R. H. Lutz, of the 
Department of History. These gentle- 
men are to continue their activities in 
the matter of acquisition of material for 
the library, but after the material is 
acquired, it will be turned over to the 
University Library. Under the terms of 
the gift, the Hoover War Library must 
be administered as an entity, hence a 
special reading room has been set apart 
for it and the collection will be handled 
by a special staff. Miss Nina Almond, 
formerly in the Catalog Division, is li- 
brarian in charge ; Miss Edith Bickham 
is cataloger ; and Miss Mildred Davis, 
fomerly assistant reference librarian of 
the Portland Library Association, is 
reference librarian. 

G. T. Clark, Lib'n. 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 20,209. 
Assessed valuation $23,733,025 (tax- 
able for county $20,713,455). 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 

County seat, Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 13,311. 
Assessed valuation $20,045,005 (tax- 
able for county $15,874,085). 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Downieville. 
Area, 957 sq. mi. Pop. 17S3. 
Assessed valuation $2,930,890 (taxable 
for county $2,541,305). 

SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(Thirty-third class.) 

County seat, Treka. 
Area, G079 sq. mi. Pop. 18,545. 
Assessed valuation $28,312,550 (tax- 
able for county $21,375,305). 

Siskiyou Co. Free Library, Yreka. 
Miss Thelma Brackett, Lib'n. 

Miss Nora Wheeler, who has for over 
two years been in charge of the school 
work in the county free library, was 
forced to resign because of eye trouble. 
Miss Wheeler went to San Francisco 
for treatments, and has now recovered 
fully. She did not care, however, to 
return to the climate of Siskiyou county, 
and so left a permanent vacancy which 
has been filled by the appointment of 
Miss Marguerite Chatfield. The librarian 
realizes her good fortune in securing the 
services of Miss Chatfield, who has been 
holding the position of reference librarian 
in the Sacramento Public Library, but 
who felt the call of the county work 
sufficiently to give up this superior posi- 
tion in order to get back into the field. 



176 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



SISKIYOU CO.— Continued. 

Edgewood Branch is now under the 
care of Mrs Frank Alexander. Mrs Syl- 
via Clayton is custodian at Dorris, in 
place of Mrs Phoebe Hammond, who hap 
left the state. Dunsmuir Branch has 
had the good fortune to be given quarters 
in the new Methodist church, which is 
a community house as well. With two 
rooms to be attractively furnished by the 
townspeople, and Miss Ethel Mulligan as 
custodian, Dunsmuir Branch at last 
threatens to grow rapidly. Miss Mulli- 
gan, who has had library experience, 
will be a considerable force in this 
growth. 

Calor Home Deposit has been formed, 
to be effective the. year round, rather 
than to be the branch only while school 
was not in session. Charles E. Cross is 
custodian. Scott Home Deposit, with 
Mrs C. E. Scott as custodian, was estab- 
lished. Mrs Bertha Yalpey's request for 
a deposit at her home in Seiad Valley 
was granted. Macdoel Branch has been 
discontinued because of the lack of a 
custodian. 

Thelma Brackett, Lib'n. 

Calor. 

Calor Home Deposit Station, Sis- 
kiyou Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

Dorris. 

Dorris Branch, Siskiyou Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Siskiyou Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Dunsmuir. 

Dunsmuir Branch, Siskiyou Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Siskiyou Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Edgewood. 

Edgewood Branch, Siskiyou Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Siskiyou Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Macdoel. 

Macdoel Branch, Siskiyou Co. Free 
Library, was discontinued during the 
quarter. 



SISKIYOU CO.— Continued. 
Scott Home Deposit (P. O. Dorris). 

Scott Home Deposit Station, Sis- 
kiyou Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 



Valpey Home Deposit (P. O. Seaid 
Valley). 

Valpey Home Deposit Station, Sis- 
kiyou Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 



SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 

County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 40,002. 
Assessed valuation $34,570,425 (tax- 
able for county $29,628,033). 

Solano Co. Free Library, Fairfield. 
Miss Clara B. Dills, Lib'n (on leave of 
absence). Miss Marjorie Chilberg, Act- 
ing Lib'n. 

A new community branch has been 
established at Elmira with Miss Cora 
Fraser in charge. 

The County Library has been co-oper- 
ating with the County Music Supervisor 
who is conducting a phonograph record 
memory contest. The school children are 
intensely interested and the contest 
promises to be an enjoyable one. 

Solano County has recently appointed 
a Home Demonstrator. This gives the 
library another means of reaching the 
branches and attending Farm Bureau 
gatherings throughout the county. 
Marjorie Chilberg, Acting Lib'n. 



Elmira. 

Elmira Branch, Solano Co. Free 
Library, was established February 1, 
1922. 



SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 

County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area. 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 51,990. 
Assessed valuation $53,335,210 (tax- 
able for county $47,353,940). 



Vol. 17, 110. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



177 



SONOMA CO.— Continued. 

Glen Ellen. 

Construction of the proposed new Jack 
London Memorial Library, which is 
being fostered by the Glen Ellen Ladies' 
Improvement Club, will be started in 
May. The foundation work will be done 
in that month, and the rest of the con- 
struction will be rushed to completion. — 
Santa Rosa Press-Democrat, F 1 

STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth class.) 

County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 1480 sq. mi. Pop. 43,557. 
Assessed valuation $58,022,514 (tax- 
able for county $51,380,510). 

Stanislaus Co. Free Libbaey, Mo- 
desto. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n. 

The library had an exhibit of books at 
the Americanization Reception held at 
the Winter Garden under the auspices of 
Community Service, January 20. The 
books were in groups labeled Books by 
Foreign-born Americans, Books of Inter- 
est to New Americans, and Gifts of the 
Nations to America's Children's Litera- 
ture. The librarian also acted as one 
of the judges of fancy work displayed by 
the foreign women and various women's 
clubs and organizations. 

The staff of the city and county li- 
brary gave a linen shower for Miss Eslin- 
ger, the cataloger, March 7, Miss Es- 
linger's engagement to Clarence Johnson, 
of Red Bluff having been recently an- 
nounced. Much merriment was occa- 
sioned by the cutting of the bride-elect's 
cake which contained a '"diamond" en- 
gagement ring, a thimble, and a piece of 
money. 

The library is co-operating with Com- 
munity Service in promoting a one-act 
play presentation to be held the last 
week of April. In the librarian's office 
are collected a quantity of one-act plays 
for examination for contestants as well 
as publishers' catalogs. A poster in the 
library vestibule announces the contest. 
A prize of $10 will go to the group giv- 
ing the best performance. 

During March the librarian gave book 
talks illustrated with exhibits of books 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued, 
before the Girls' Friendly Society of 
Modesto, and the Triangle Club of 
Hughson. "Children's literature" was 
the subject of an address given by the 
librarian before the Stoddard Mothers' 
Club, January 26. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, of the 
State Library, was a welcome visitor at 
the library during March. 

Bessie B. Silverthorn. Lib'n. 

SUTTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class.) 
County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, Gil sq. mi. Pop. 10,115. 
Assessed valuation $21,732,757 (tax- 
able for county $18,241,155). 

Sutter Co. Free Library, Yuba City. 
Miss Edna J. Hewitt, Lib'n. 

The Board of Supervisors has given 
us permission to enlarge our headquar- 
ters. We are to use all of the unused 
portion of Mission Hall. This will give 
us one more large room. 

Edna Hewitt, Lib'n. 

TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 12,882. 
Assessed valuation $10,841,981 (tax- 
able for county $10,907,555). 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fifth class.) 

County seat, Weaverville. 
Area, 3276 sq. mi. Pop. 2551. 
Assessed valuation $3,844,235 (taxable 
for county $3,524,755). 

TULARE COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 
County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4803 sq. mi. Pop. 59,081. 
Assessed valuation $S1,73S,804 (tax- 
able for county $07,240,380). 

Tulare Co. Free Library, Visalia. 
Miss Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Mrs Nellie De Laughter, of the St. 
Louis Public Library, has been appointed 
to fill the cataloger's position in this li- 
brary, the appointment to be effective 



178 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 
April 8. After attending the New York 
State Library School Mrs De Laughter 
was employed in the St. Louis Public 
Library as assistant eataloger, branch 
librarian and classifier. 

Miss Margaret Walters, recently li- 
brarian of the Henrietta (Oklahoma) 
rublic Library, has been appointed assist- 
ant eataloger. Miss Walters attended 
the Riverside Public Library training- 
school. Previous to 1917 she served as 
reference librarian and during 1917-19 
as acting librarian of the Oklahoma 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Stillwater, Oklahoma. Miss Evelyn Kite 
and Berenice Price of Visalia have been 
assisting at the Main Office during the 
past few months. 

Two rural schools, Walnut Grove and 
Welcome, have joined the library during 
the quarter. 

Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Walnut Grove School Dist. (P. O. and 
exp. Tulare). 
Walnut Grove School Dist. 
Branch, Tulare Co. Free Libraey, 
was established January 17, 1922. 

Welcome School Dist. (P. O. and exp. 
Porterville). 
Welcome School Dist. Branch, 
Tulare Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished January 27, 1922. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 
County seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 7768. 
Assessed valuation $11,566,968 (tax- 
able for county $8,515,256). 

Tuolumne Co. Free Library, Sonora. 
Miss Helen M. Rowland, Lib'n. 

During the quarter a branch was es- 
tablished in Algerine school district. 

Helen M. Rowland, Lib'n. 

Algerine School Dist. (P. O. Stent; 
no exp. office). 
Algerine School Dist. Branch. 
Tuolumne Co. 'Free Library, was es- 
tablished January 15, 1922. 



VENTURA COUNTY. 

(Twenty-third class.) 

County seat, Ventura. 
Area, 1850 sq. mi. Pop. 28,724. 
Assessed valuation $49,443,641 (tax- 
able for county $43,396,706). 

Ventura Co. Free Library, Ventura. 
Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

The Briggs School District and the 
Fillmore U~nion High School have become 
branches of the Ventura County Free 
Library. Branches have also been estate 
lished at Boney Mountain, Frazier Moun- 
tain, the Maxey Ranch and on Torrey 
Mountain. The branch at Foster Park 
has been discontinued. The Frazier 
Mountain Branch used to be in Los An- 
geles County, but with the changing of 
the boundary lines, it is now in Ventura. 
The County Library and the City Li- 
brary of Ventura City are now both 
under the same management. 

Several changes have taken place in 
the staff and among the custodians. Mrs 
Annie Cook has taken the place of her 
husband, Mr C. W. Cook, as custodian 
of the Montebello Branch Library. Miss 
Hilda Wegis was appointed in place of 
Mrs F. W. Hawes of Ozena at the branch 
at that place. Miss Dora McKinlay, first 
assistant in the county library, has re- 
signed, Miss M. Almon Harrington is ap- 
pointed in her place, and Mrs Jean M. 
Vincent takes Miss Harrington's place. 
Mrs Vincent comes from the New York 
Public Library. 

The supervisors have allowed the 
county librarian seven cents a mile for 
the use of a machine in which to travel 
around the county. 

The collection of records for use in 
the schools is established and the schools 
are enjoying the music ; this was Miss 
Steffa's plan. The Ocean View School 
borrowed the library Victrola and gave 
two weeks of special music work. A test 
was given the pupils at the end of that 
time. Two were able to identify every 
record which they had heard both by 
composer and title. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 



Vol. 17, 110. 2] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



179 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 

Boney Mountain (P. O. Newbury Park; 

no exp. office). 

Boney Mountain Branch, Ventura 
Co. Free Library, was established March 
6, 1922. 

Briggs School Dist. (P.O. Santa Paula, 
R. R. ; exp. Santa Paula). 

Briggs School Dist. Branch, Ven- 
tura Co. Free Library, was established 
February 1, 1922. 

Fillmore. 

Fillmore Union High School Li- 
brary. J. Wm. Gastrich, Prin. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Foster Park (P.O. Ventura, R. R.; exp. 
Ventura). 

Foster Park Branch, Ventura Co. 
Free Library, was discontinued Septem- 
ber 15, 1921. 

Frazier Mountain (P. O. Gorman; no 
exp. office). 

Frazier Mountain Branch, Ven- 
tura Co. Free Library. Est. November 
29, 1921. 

Maxey Ranch (P. O. Gorman; no exp 
office). 

Maxey Ranch Branch, Ventura 
Co. Free Library. Est. November 29, 
1921. 

Montebello (P. O. and exp. Fillmore). 

Montebello Branch, Ventura Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 

Ocean View School Dist. (P. O. Ox- 

nard, R. R.; exp. Oxnard). 

Ocean View School Dist. Branch, 
Ventura Co. Free Library. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Ozena (No exp. office). 

Ozena Branch, Ventura Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Torrey Mountain (P. O. and exp. Piru). 
Torrey Mountain Branch, A'entura 
Co. Free Library, was established 
March G, 1922. 

YOLO COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth class.) 
County seat, Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 17,105. 
Assessed valuation $31,309,701 (tax- 
able for county $26.3S5,SC0 ) . 

Davis. 

Davis Free Library. Miss Hattie 
Weber, Lib'n. 

The library hours are longer than for- 
merly, since we are open from 2 to 5 p.m. 
on Wednesday. Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday and from 7 to 9 p.m. on Mon- 
day, Wednesday and Friday. This last 
month we have had a reading room in con- 
nection with the library, though we still 
have just the one room. 

Hattie Weber, Lib'n. 

YUBA COUNTY. 

(Fortieth class.) 
County seat, Marysville. 
Area, G25 sq. mi. Pop. 10,375. 
Assessed valuation $19,961,953 (tax- 
able for county $17,042,195). 



180 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



Many public libraries waste a great 
deal of time and money before they find 
good places to get supplies. The plan is 
to give all libraries the benefit of the 
experience of the older libraries of the 
State by listing under different heads the 
houses that have been found to give sat- 
isfaction, the names and addresses being 
furnished by the older and larger libraries 
of California. In this way suggestions 
will be given as to where different sorts 
of books may be bought, where books may 
be rebound or periodicals bound, where 
library furniture may be bought, etc., 
both in California and in the East. 

If any information is needed abput the 
firms listed below, which can not be ob- 
tained from the firms themselves, the 
names of the libraries recommending the 
different ones will be sent to any library 
upon application to the State Library. 

SUPPLIES. 
Amateur Plays. 

Acting Dramas foe Amateurs. 

The Book Den, 464 Eighth St., Oakland, 
Calif. 

A. L. A. 
Booklist. 

78 E. Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

Catalog. 
1904 ed. $1. 

Superintendent of Documents, Govern- 
ment Printing Office, Washington, 
D. C. 
1904-11 ed. $1.50. 

A. L. A. Pub. Board, 78 E. Washing- 
ton st., Chicago, 111. 

Headquarters and Publishing Board, 
78 E. Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

Binding and Mending. 
Binding. 

Foster & Futernick Co., 39 Battery st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 460 Fourth st, San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 210 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 
Silvius and Schoenbackler, 423 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 
Mending. 

Stix Co., San Jose. 
Stix-Parchment mending tissue. 



Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will 
be furnished by the State Library. 

Book Cases. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 

Hoegee Co., 13S-142 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Boxes. 

Pacific Box Factory, 2600 Taylor st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Corrugated paper cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and 

Folsom sts., San Francisco, Calif. 
Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 Front 
st., Sacramento, Calif. 

Book Plates. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 West 

27th st., New York, N. Y. 
Sequoyah Studio, 319 42d st., Oakland, 

Calif. 
Times-Mirror Printing & Binding 

House, 118 S. Broadway, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Western Lithograph Co., 600-610 E. 

Second st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Pockets. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 460 Fourth st, San 

Francisco, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Southern California Distributors), 

610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 



V01. 17, no. 2] DIRECTORY OF LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



181 



Book Pockets — Continued. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

The Zellerbach Paper Co., 534 Battery 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furniture, Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

Van Horn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco. Calif. 

Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Books. 

Baker & Taylor Co., 354 4th ave., New 
York City. 

Emporium, 835-865 Market st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Himebaugh & Browne, 471 Fifth ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

H. R. Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 330 E. Ohio st., Chicago, 111. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st., 
New York City. 

Newbegin's, 358 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parker's Book Store (C. C. Parker), 
220 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Chas. Scribner's Sons, 5th ave. and 4Sth 
st., New York, N. Y. 



Books — Continued. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
Union Library Association, 225 Fifth 

ave., New York City. 
Vronian's Book Store, 60 E. Colorado 

st., Pasadena. 
Harr Wagner, 1112 Hearst Bldg., San 

Francisco, Calif. 

Especially western books by western authors. 

White House, Sutter st., bet. Grant ave. 
and Kearny st., San Francisco, Calif. 

English Books and Publications. 
G. PI Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 

Foeeign Books and Publications in 
Various Languages. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
Lemcke & Buechner, 30-32 East Twen- 
tieth st., New York City. 

French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & J. 
Delabriandais, 324 Stockton st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, 19 Rue Scribe, Paris, 
France. 

Italian. 

A. Cavalli & Co., 255 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Spanish. 

Victoriano Suarez, Madrid, Spain. 

Law Books. 
Bancroft-Whitney Co., 200 McAllister 

st., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew-Bender & Co., 109 State St., 

Albany, N. Y. 

School Books. 

California School Book Depository, 571 
Market st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Ginn & Co., 20 Second st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 330 E. Ohio st., Chicago, 111. 

Milton Bradley Co., 20 Second st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Owen Publishing Co., 681 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

White House, Sutter st, bet. Grant ave. 
and Kearny st., San Francisco, Calif. 



182 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Books — Continued. 
Second-Hand Books. 

McDevitt- Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church St., 

New York City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New Ox- 
ford st., London, Eng. 
Powner's Book Store, 542 Spring st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
A. R. Womrath, 15 E. 28th st, New 

York, N. Y. 

For used fiction. 
Especially Calif orniana. 

Dawson's Book Shop, 518 S. Hill st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
F. M. De Witt, 1609 Telegraph ave., 

Oakland, Calif. 
Holmes Book Co., 104 Market st, San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 

See Fubnitube and Supplies. 

Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pnrnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 

II. S. Crocker & Co., 565-571 Market 
st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 121 
Second st., San Francisco, and 626 
S. Spring st, Los Angeles, Calif. 



County Free Library Signs. 

For information, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 

Dandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent, New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 

Bee Fubnituee and Supplies. 

Films. 
For Rent. 

American Red Cross, Pacific Division, 

Larkin and McAllister sts., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pathe Exchange, Inc., Non-Theatrical 

Dept, 9S5 Market st., San Francisco, 

Calif. 
United States Forest Service, Ferry 

bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 
University of California, Extension 

Division, Berkeley, Calif. 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Grimes-Stassforth Stationery Co., 737- 
739 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Desk Co., 677 Mission 
st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st, Los Angeles, 
Calif. 



Vol. 17, 110. 2] DIRECTORY OF LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



183 



Furniture and Supplies — Continued. 

Filing Cases for Music. 
Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Globes. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st, 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazine Binders. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Elbe File and Binder Co., 215-217 

Greene st, New York, N. Y. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Gem Binder Co., 65 W. Broadway, 

New York. 
Wm. G. Johnston & Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Southern California Distributors), 

610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazines. 

»S'ee Periodicals. 

Maps. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st., 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Music. 
Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d st., New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlets and Multi-Binders and 
Pamphlet Boxes. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Pasting Machines. 
A. G. Prior, 136 Liberty st., New York, 
N. Y. 



Perforating Stamps. 
B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 
Back Volumes and Numbers. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st., 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

F. M. De Witt, 1609 Telegraph ave., 
Oakland, Calif. 

International Magazine Co., 339 Bay 
Way North, Elizabeth, N. J. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 
st., New York, N. Y. 

IT. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 
ave., New York City. 

Subscription Agencies. 

John A. Clow, 2925 N. Lake ave., 
Pasadena, Calif. 

Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 
Square, New York City. 

Moore-Cottrell Subscription Agencies, 
North Cohocton, N. Y. 

Mutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 
zer Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

San Francisco News Co., 747 Howard 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 Cham- 
ber of Commerce Bldg., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

II. W. Wilson Co., 95S-64 University 
ave., New York City. 

Pictures. 

Braun & Co., Dornach, Alsace, France. 
Toni Landau Photo Co., 1 E. 45th st., 

New York, N. Y. 
(Formerly Berlin Photographic Co.) 
Curtis & Cameron, Copley Square, 

Boston, Mass. 

Especially for reproduction of American art. 

Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Vickery, Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 

Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First st., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., 131 S. 

Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 



]84 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Rubber Stamps and Type — Continued. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Scales. 
Fairbanks-Morse & Co., 651 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Shelf Label- Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Signs. 

Dromgold-Scbroeder Co., 1033 S. Los 

Angeles st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sam H. Harris, 631 S. Spring st., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

st., San Francisco, Calif. 
Tablet & Ticket Co., 604 Mission st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Slides. 

Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp Affixers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Steel Stacks. 

See Book Stacks. 

Stereoscopic Views. 

Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 

Philip Brigandi (Agent Keystone View 
Co. and Underwood & Underwood), 
1618 North Hobart blvd., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Willis E. Case (Agent Keystone View 
Co. and Underwood & Underwood), 
1610 Grove St., Berkeley, Calif. 
Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 444 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 240 Bush 
st., San Francisco, 424 S. Spring st., 
Los Angeles, and 1127 9th st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 426 S. 
Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
st., San Francisco, 430 S. Broadway, 
Los Angeles, and 611 J st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Los Angeles Library School. For full 
information, write to Librarian, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, California. 

See, also, this publication p. 157. 

Riverside Library Service School. 
For full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, California. 

See, also, this publication p. 106. 

University of California Course in Li- 
brary Methods. For full information 
write to Librarian, University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley, Calif. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The officers of the American Library 
Association for 1921—22 are as follows : 

Azariah S. Root, Librarian, Oberlin 
College Library, Oberlin, Ohio, President. 

Samuel H. Ranck, Librarian, Public 
Library, Grand Rapids, Mich., 1st Vice- 
President. 

Miss Claribel R. Barnett, Librarian, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture Library, 
Washington, D. C, 2d Vice-President. 

Carl H. Milam, Chicago, Secretary. 

Edward D. Tweedell, Assistant Libra- 
rian, The John Crerar Library, Chicago, 
111., Treasurer. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
STATE LIBRARIES. 

The officers of the National Associa- 
tion of State Libraries for 1921-22 are as 
follows : 

J. M. Hitt, Washington State Library, 
Seattle, President. 

Mrs Jessie Palmer Weber. Illinois State 
Historical Library, Springfield, 1st Vice- 
President. 

Herbert O. Brigham, Librarian, Rhode 
Island State Library, Providence, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer. 

LIBRARY WORKERS ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the Library Workers 
Association for 1921-22 are as follows : 

Catherine Van Dyne, National Work- 
men's Compensation Service Bureau, New 
York City, President. 

Marian C. Manley, Public Library, 
Sioux City, Iowa, Secretary. 

Carl L. Cannon, Public Library, New 
York City, Treasurer. 



Vol. 17, no. 2] DIRECTORY OF LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



185 



CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the School Library Asso- 
ciation for 1921-22 are : 

Northern Section — President. Miss 
Helen Price, University High School, 
Oakland. 

Secretary -Treasurer, Miss Mary Ives, 
Fremont High School, Oakland. 

Southern Section — President, Miss 
Statie Weber, Hollywood High School, 
Los Angeles. 

Secretary - Treasurer, Mrs Margaret 
G. Scott, Orange Union High School. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers. 

Mrs Marion S. Percival, '15, President. 

Miss Ellen B. Frink, '19, Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

Miss Bessie B. Heath, '19, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 



EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 
The State Library is ready to 
register all library workers in California 
who are looking for positions and all 
from outside the state who wish to come 
here. Also it will be glad to know of 
libraries that want head librarians or 
assistants in any branch of their work. 
In writing for recommendations, libraries 
are urged to be as specific as possible, 
especially in regard to time position must 
be filled and salary offered. For further 
information, write to the State Library, 
Sacramento, California. 

GIFT TO LIBRARIES! 

State Forester M. B. Pratt, author of 
Shade and Ornamental Trees of Cali- 
fornia, recently distributed this publica- 
tion free to libraries throughout Cali- 
fornia. It may be consulted in the li- 
braries of the state. If o'ther institu- 
tions or individuals wish copies, there is 
a supply for sale at $2.50 a copy. Appli- 
cation should be made to the State 
Forester. Sacramento, California. 



SCHOOL LIBRARY STATISTICS. 

(From reports of County Superintendents of Schools, 1920-21.) 

Total school districts 3,750 

Elementary 3,407 

High 343 

Total expended for books for elementary schools $314,965 

Total expended for books for high schools $895,331 

Total volumes in elementary schools 2,813,172 

Total volumes in high schools 752,313 



186 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Althea H. Warren, Public 
Library, San Diego. 

Vice-President, Sydney B. Mitchell, 
University of California Library, Berke- 
ley. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Eleanor Hitt, San 
Diego County Free Library, San Diego. 

Trustees Section. 

President, F. H. Pettingell, Trustee 
Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Mrs Katherine G. Smith, 
Trustee Public Library, Los Angeles. 

Municipal Libraries Section. 
President, Susan T. Smith, City Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee — The President, 
Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer and 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Milton J. Fer- 
guson, Celia Gleason, Everett R. Perry, 
Cornelia D. Provines, Joseph H. Quire. 

Auditing — F. H. Pettingell, chairman ; 
Gabrielle Morton. 

Nominating — The Constitution provides 
for a "Nominating Committee consisting 
of representatives selected by the respec- 
tive districts at their district meetings." 
Second district, Mary Barmby ; Fourth 
district, Sarah E. McCardle ; Fifth dis- 
trict, H. O. Parkinson ; Sixth district, 
Marion Horton ; Seventh district, H. A. 
Kendal ; Ninth district, Edna J. Hewitt. 

Publications — Alice J. Haines, State 
Library, chairman ; Blanche Chalfant, 
Beulah Mumm. 

Resolutions — Helen E. Haines, 1175 
N. Mentor ave., Pasadena, chairman ; 
Charles S. Greene, Sarah M. Jacobus. 

Certification — Jeannette M. Drake, 
Public Library, Pasadena, chairman ; 
Mrs Theodora R. Brewitt, Joseph H. 
Quire, Susan T. Smith, Helen E. 
Vogleson. 



Cooperation— Susan T. Smith, City 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Zaidee 
Brown, Essae M. Culver, Margaret 
Hatch, Celia A. Hayward, Ida M. Mun- 
son, Faith E. Smith. 

J. L. Gillis Memorial — Milton J. Fer- 
guson, chairman ; Mary Barmby, Eleanor 
Hitt. 

Legislative — Joseph H. Quire, State 
Library, Sacramento, chairman ; Mrs 
Algeline M. Lawson, Julia Steffa. 

Membership — Carleton B. Joeckel, Pub- 
lic Library, Berkeley, chairman ; Jasmine 
Britton, Elta L. Camper, Mabel R. Gillis, 
Marjorie H. Kobler, Sarah E. McCardle. 

Music — Jessie M. Fredricks, Public 
Library, San Francisco, chairman ; Elea- 
nor Caruthers, Essae M. Culver. 

Recruiting for Librarianship — Katha- 
rine D. Kendig, Public Library, Santa 
Barbara, chairman ; Gladys Caldwell, 
Artena Chapin. 

Salaries — Milton J. Ferguson, chair- 
man ; Carleton B. Joeckel, Sydney B. 
Mitchell. . 

A. L. A. Representative — Everett R. 
Perry. 

DISTRICT OFFICERS AND 
DISTRICTS. 

First District. 

President, Mrs Elizabeth G. Potter, 
Margaret Carnegie Library, Mills College. 

Secretary, Gladys English, Public Li< 
brary, Berkeley. 

The first district consists of the foU 
lowing cities : San Francisco, Alameda, 
Berkeley, Oakland ; and the following 
libraries : Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity Library and Margaret Carnegie 
Library, Mills College. 

Second District. 

President, Anne Hadden, Monterey 
County Free Library, Salinas. 

Secretary, Edna Holroyd, San Mateo 
County Free Library, Redwood City. 



vol. 17, no. 2' 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



187 



The second district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties: Alameda (excepting Ala- 
meda, Berkeley, and Oakland), Contra 
Costa, Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo, 
Santa Clara (excepting Stanford Univer- 
sity), Santa Cruz. 

Third District. 

President, Christal Fox, Public Li- 
brary, Healdsburg. 

Secretary, Ruth Hall, Public Library, 
Santa Rosa. 

The third district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lake, Marin, Mendo- 
cino, Napa, Solano, Sonoma. 

Fourth District. 

President,- Sarah E. McCardle, Fresno 
County Free Library, Fresno. 

Secretary, Mrs Florence E. Robinson, 
Fresno County Free Library, Fresno. 

The fourth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Fresno, Inyo, Kern, 
Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stan- 
islaus, Tulare, Tuolumne. 

Fifth District. 

President, H. O. Parkinson, Public 
Library, Stockton. 

Secretary, Angeline Orr, Public Li- 
brary, Stockton. 

The fifth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties : Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, 
El Dorado, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Sacra- 
mento, San Joaquin, Yolo. 

Sixth District. 

President, Marion L. Horton. Public 
Library, Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Mrs Frances B. Linn, Pub- 
lic Library, Santa Barbara. 

The sixth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Imperial, Los Angeles, 
Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Sau 
Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, 
Ventura. 

Seventh District. 

President, Ida M. Reagan, Humboldt 
County Free Library, Eureka. 

Secretary, Winifred Menzies, Hum- 
boldt County Free Library, Eureka. 

The seventh district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Del Norte, Humboldt. 



Eighth District. 

President, Elisabeth C. Haines,. Lassen 
County Free Library, Susanville. 

Secretary, Anna L. Williams, Public 
Library, Alturas. 

The eighth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth District. 

President, Edna Hewitt, Sutter County 
Free Library, Yuba City. 

Secretary, Patricia Lang, Sutter 
County Free Library, Yuba City. 

The ninth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Butte, Colusa, Glenn, 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trin- 
ity, Yuba. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The 27th annual meeting will be held 
at Hotel del Coronado, Coronado, June 
12 to 15, 1922. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

A meeting of the Executive Committee 
of the California Library Association was 
held in Los Angeles, Thursday evening, 
January .">, 1022, with all members 
present. 

Reports were submitted by the Secre- 
tary - treasurer ; and, by the President, 
from the chairmen of various commit- 
tees of the Association. 

The President spoke of the excellent 
publications for which the Association 
was responsible a number of years ago 
and of the fact that recently the pub- 
lishing has been confined to the Hand- 
book and Proceedings. There followed 
a general discussion of the kind of publi- 
cations that would be practical and 
helpful and a motion was made and car- 
ried "that the California Library Asso- 
ciation issue bi-monthly bulletins on Cali- 
fornia subjects or on activities of the 
Association, and that the President be 
authorized to appoint an editor for each 
publication.' 

The next matter taken up was the 
time and place for holding the annual 
meeting of 1922. Invitations were read 
from Long Beach and Paso Robles and 
in addition the following places wei"e con- 



188 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



sidered : Santa Barbara, Pasadena, Los 
Angeles, Catalina Island and Coronado. 
The committee finally narrowed the choice 
to Catalina or Coronado, the final deci- 
sion to be made by the President after 
further investigation of dates and rates. 

The Committee then listened to a re- 
port of the Certification Committee, from 
Miss Drake, the Chairman. After hear- 
ing and discussing the advantages and 
disadvantages of the various schemes 
which the Committee had considered, it 
was moved and carried "that the Execu- 
tive Committee record its feeling that 
the scheme known as the 'Williamson 
scheme' (Library Journal, July, 1921, 
p. 604) should be used as a basis for 
California certification, its provisions to 
be interpreted liberally for those in the 
work and rigidly for those entering the 
profession." 

BULLETIN. 

The first of the bi-monthly bulletins 
was issued in March and contained, be- 
sides news items, "Some garden books for 
California," by Sydney B. Mitchell. 

DISTRICT MEETINGS. 
First District Meeting. 

A meeting of the First District, Cali- 
fornia Library Association, was held at 
the San Francisco Public Library, Janu- 
ary 28, 1922. The meeting was called 
to order by the District President, Mrs 
Elizabeth G. Porter. 

After an address by Sydney B. 
Mitchell on the University of California 
Library School the morning session was 
devoted to . Round Table discussions : 
Reference, conducted by Miss Alice 
Hays ; Cataloging, by Miss Alice Healy ; 
Children and branch libraries, by Miss 
Helen H. Jackson ; School Libraries, by 
Mrs Elizabeth S. Madison and Special 
Libraries, by Miss Lillian M. McKinnon. 

The afternoon session was opened by 
piano selection by Miss Ada Clement, 
followed by Story telling as a method of 
presenting literature to children, by Miss 
Edna Whiteman, of the San Francisco 
State Teachers College ; Reading from 
his poems, by Charles Keeler ; Vocal 
selections, by William S. Chamberlain ; 



The Hoover Collection, by Prof E. D. 
Adams ; What Americans are Reading, 
by Dr Aurelia Henry Reinhardt. 

Gladys English, Secretary. 

Second District Meeting. 

The Second District of the California 
Library Association held a meeting in the 
Community House at Palo Alto on Feb- 
ruary 4, 1922. 

The members gathered at 12.15 for 
luncheon and then proceeded for the 
afternoon's program to the Community 
House, where fires in the large fireplaces 
and an abundance of flowers made a 
charming setting for the occasion. 

The meeting was called to order by the 
president, Miss Anne Hadden. 

Miss Lucile Huff: gave pleasure by her 
singing of two songs, by California com- 
posers. 

Mrs Edith Maddux of the San Fran- 
cisco Community Center, told of the Palo 
Alto Community House and its begin- 
nings and of the great good such an 
institution can perform in any com- 
munity. Miss Diaz, hostess of the Com- 
munity House, spoke of the various 
activities carried on there. The in- 
stances she gave of the widely differing 
ages, interests and social rank of- the 
people who work together for the Com- 
munity House and play in it together, 
convinced one that a Community House 
is needed in every town for the further- 
ance of friendliness and good fellowship. 

M. J. Ferguson, State Librarian, spoke 
of the help libraries can be to the busi- 
ness world in its problem of getting back 
to a sane basis. He told also of the re- 
cent revival in library building. 

Three interesting papers dealing with 
the subject of books of the past year 
followed. Mrs Ora Regnart reviewed a 
number of the recent books of fiction. 
Miss Ellen Frink's selection of the worth- 
while non-fiction »f the year was well 
made and her comments helpful. Miss 
Norah McNeill discussed recent children's 
books and the problem of children's read- 
ing in general, and emphasized the need 
of supervision by school teachers of their 
pupils' reading. 

Miss Mary Barmby was elected nom- 
inator for the Second District, with Miss 
Frances Patterson as alternate. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



189 



After an intermission the meeting re- 
assembled for round table discussions of 
library questions. Mrs Mary Gervais of 
the Burlingame Public Library conducted 
the Public Library round table, Miss 
Margaret Girdner of the Palo Alto High 
School Library, the High School and 
College round table, and Mrs A. G. Whit- 
beck of the Contra Costa County Free 
Library, the County Library round table. 

The meeting adjourned after voting 
thanks to Mrs Maddux and Miss Diaz. 

There was a large attendance at the 
meeting, the sunny weather and the ac- 
cessibility of Palo Alto making it possi- 
ble for many to attend. We were happy 
to have with us several librarians from 
other districts. 

Edna Holroyd, Secretary. 

Sixth District Meeting. 

A meeting of the Sixth District, Cali- 
fornia Library Association, was held at 
the Santa Barbara Public Library, Jan- 
uary 7, 1922, the District President, 
Marion Horton, presiding. 

A progress report of the Certifica- 
tion Committee was made by the chair- 
man, Jeannette M. Drake. Marion Hor- 
ton was elected nominator, with Mrs 
Frances B. Linn, as alternate. 

The program was : Adventures in book 
collecting, Dr Walter Lindley ; Manu- 
scripts in the Huntington collection, 
George Watson Cole ; Round Table dis- 
cussions : Books for business men, con- 
ducted by Vivian G. Smith ; Books for 
foreigners, by Sarah M. Jacobus ; Fic- 
tion, by Eleanor Hitt ; Books for chil- 
dren, by Elizabeth G. Riddell ; Books for 
high school students, by Laura G. Smith. 

In the afternoon the topics were Cali- 
fornia part-time law as it affects libra- 
ries, by Vierling Kersey ; A. L. A. work 
with the Navy, by Charles H. Brown ; 
Opportunities in bookselling, by Eleanor 
Foster ; The social worker and the li- 
brary, by Ethel Richardson ; The libra- 
rian and the book, by Ethel R. Sawyer. 
Frances Burns Linn, Secretary. 

Seventh District Meeting. 

Members of the Seventh District of 
the California Library Association met 
March 11, 1922, at the County Library, 
where at one o'clock luncheon was served. 



During the business session H. A. Ken- 
dal of the Eureka Free Library was 
appointed nominator for the district. 
The feasibility of inviting the Association 
to convene in Eureka next year was dis- 
cussed. 

Those present at the meeting were : H. 
A. Kendal of the Eureka Free Library ; 
Miss Ruth Fleming of the Humboldt 
State Teachers College Library ; Miss 
Kathleen Hacker of the Eureka High 
School Library ; Miss Virginia Todd of 
the Areata Public Library ; Mrs Florence 
McClaskey. former assistant in the coun- 
ty library; Miss Ida Reagan, County Li- 
brarian of Humboldt county, district 
president, and Miss Winifred Menzies, 
assistant in county library, secretary. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON 
COOPERATION. 

The Committee on Cooperation gath- 
sred valuable information regarding 
special collections in the libraries of 
their vicinity. It is not possible to note 
all, but the following are of unusual 
interest : 

The collection of the Scottish Rite Li- 
brary, San Francisco, is not merely an 
ordinary Masonic Library, but has been 
selected with a broad-minded view to 
"follow the stream of modern and 
medieval religion back to and through 
the mythologies of antiquity — back to 
a time so remote that the Temple of 
Solomon was not yet dreamed of — 
a time when the shepherds and hus- 
bandmen . of Egypt, India and Chaldea 
used as symbols to communicate knowl- 
edge, the sun, the stars, and the planets." 
There are books seldom seen and diffi- 
cult to procure, through which the source 
and history of Freemasonry can be 
traced. For refererence only, under 
proper safeguard, that is, to scholars of 
any faith when a written or personal 
request is made. 

The Santa Cruz Public Library has a 
museum, the gift of Miss Laura Hecox, 
for many years the lighthouse keeper at 
Santa Cruz. This is made up of several 
small collections : corals, minerals, bird 
skins and eggs, mounted birds, etc. 
These have been loaned to schools. The 
mounted specimens are used by the draw- 
| ing classes. 



190 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



The library has a craftshop on its 
Tyrrell Park property. The output of 
the looms does not supply the demand. 
There is a continuous art exhibit here 
under the management of the Art 
League. Lectures upon the arts and 
crafts are held frequently. 

The Pacific Unitarian School for the 
Ministry Library, Berkeley, has a collec- 
tion of Unitarian literature and history, 
including local history. Much of this is 
in the form of pamphlets and periodicals. 
Is free for reference and loaned freely. 

The Pacific School of Religion Library, 
Berkeley, has a large and rapidly grow- 
ing department of religious education, 
undenominational in character. Covers 
theology, church history, missions. Strong 
in both Old and New Testament litera- 
ture. Reference and loan. 

The U. S. Geological Survey Library, 
San Francisco, has publications of gov- 
ernment on the subjects of mining, 
geology, water resources, etc. Includes 
all geologic and topographic and key maps 
for every state in the union. The library 
is for reference and distribution, and a 
wider knowledge of its resources by the 
public would be welcomed. 

The Shell Oil Company of California, 
San Francisco, has complete U. S. 
Geological survey bulletins to date on file. 
LT. S. Geological reports, vol. 2 — to date. 
Complete bibliography of all geology west 
of Rocky Mountains, and bibliographies 
compiled and supplied. Very complete 
collection of current periodicals on petro- 
leum. Photostats of magazine articles put 
in covers and kept in vertical file. Illus- 
trations in these photostats particularly 
clear ; also large collections of clippings. 
Digests of articles are supplied and every 
Friday a weekly letter is typed giving a 
summary of all that has occurred in oil 
during the week, including legislative 
action. These are bound in annual vol- 
umes ; 11)21 will be vol. 3. 

Collection of maps of oil fields, etc., in 
unique map holder. Everything circu- 



lates without restriction. There is also 
a card file of miscellaneous matters of 
interest in oil, including names of oil 
men. 

The librarian of the Covina Public 
Library has items of local history, ob- 
tained from "old setlers," which she 
hopes to put into form for ready refer- 
ence use later. 

The Edward L. Doheny Collection, in 
the Occidental College Library, comprises 
pamphlets, scrap-books of newspaper clip- 
pings, and books on Mexico. Concerns 
particularly the economic aspect, though 
history and travel are included. A few 
books in Spanish. Prof Clelland plans to 
enlarge the collection, making it also a 
memorial to his father, Rev R. W. Clel- 
land. Books are for use of students 
only, or for others to use in the library. 
Would be unable to copy any material 
for outside use. 

The Santa Ana Public Library reports 
a number of books from the library of 
Mme Helena Modjeska which were given 
by her and are autographed. They in- 
clude parts of sets of Dickens, Byron, 
etc. 

The A. K. Smiley Public Library has 
a Carnegie Indian collection covering 
everything west of the Rockies. The 
fund for purchase was given by Carnegie ; 
books were purchased by U. S. Bureau of 
Ethnology. Bulletin, vol. 1, complete. 
About 3'00 vols, altogether. Reference 
use. 

Collection of antiquities from Egyptian 
Exploration Fund. Gift of Charles Put- 
nam. Includes pottery, mummified small 
animals, tear vases, etc., from tombs. 
Reference use only. Explanatory vol- 
umes accompany it. Craig collection of 
local history. 

Howard White engineering collection. 
One hundred pamphlets on engineering 
projects throughout the world. All older 
material. 

Susan T. Smith, 

Chairman. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS. 



191 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library, Secretary. 

Everett R. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free li- 
brary law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 1911) 
read as follows : 

Sec. 6. A commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library. 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing, by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of county 
librarian unless, prior to his appointment, 
he has received from the board of library 
examiners a certificate of qualification for 
the office. At the time of his appoint- 
ment, the county librarian need not be a 
resident of the county nor a citizen of the 
State of California. 

CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Note. — First-grade certificates are valid 
for use throughout the state ; second grade, 
in counties of the twenty-first to the fifty- 
eighth (except twenty-fifth, thirty-third, 
thirty-fifth and forty-second) classes, in- 
clusive. Third-grade certificates, formerly 
issued for use in counties of the forty- 
ninth to the fifty-eighth classes, inclusive, 
are no longer issued. 

The new certificate, issued for the first 
time, December 22, 1920, is valid for use 
throughout the state. 

First Grade. 

Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Bailey, Anne Bell, Asst. Freeno County 

Free Library, Fresno. 
Bigley, Winifred H., Ln. Merced County 

Free Library, Merced. 
Coulter, Mabel, Asst. Contra Costa County 

Free Library, Martinez. 
Culver, Essae M., Asst. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Napa County Free 

Library, Napa. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. 
Flower, Gretchen L, Ln. Tulare County 

Free Library, Visalia. 
Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 

Library, Salinas. 



Haines, Alice J., Head Documents Dept., 
State Library, Sacramento. 

Hatch, Margaret, Ln. Standard Oil Co. Li- 
brary, San Francisco. 

Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. San Mateo Coun- 
ty Free Library, Redwood City. 

Morse, Marion, Ln. Maui County Free 
Library, Wailuku, T. H. 

Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 
Angeles. 

Provines, Cornelia D., Ln. Sacramento 
County Free Library, Sacramento. 

Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 
Free Library, Eureka. 

Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. Stanislaus 
County Free Library, Modesto. 

Smith, Susan T., Ln. City Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Steffa, Julia, Ln. Madera County Free 
Library, Madera. 

Suggett, Mrs Laura (Steffens), Mrs Allen 
H. Suggett, Ln. Sutro Branch, State 
Library, San Francisco. 

Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 
Public Library and Santa Cruz County 
Free Library, Santa Cruz. 

Waters, Caroline S.. Ln. San Bernardino 
County Free Library, San Bernardino. 

Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 
County Free Library, Martinez. 



New Certificate. 

Barmby, Mary, Ln. Alameda County Free 

Library, Oakland. 
B e e m a n , Mrs Anne (Madison) , Mrs 

Thomas Beeman, Ln. Imperial County 

Free Library, El Centre 
Brackett, Thelma, Ln. Siskiyou County 

Free Library, Yreka. 
Brewitt, Mrs Theodora R., Asst. Ln. Pub- 
lic Library, Long Beach. 
Burket, Frances M., Ln. Amador County 

Free Library, Jackson. 
Chalfant, Blanche, Asst. Yolo County Free 

Library, Woodland. 
Chatfield, Marguerite, Asst. City Library, 

Sacramento. 
Chilberg, Marjorie J., Asst. Solano County 

Free Library, Fairfield. 
Dobell, Lila Grace, Ln. Trinity County 

Free Library, Weaverville. 
Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Ferris, Katharine Post, Asst. Public Li- 
brary, Los Angeles. 
Frink, Ellen B., Asst. Monterey County 

Free Library, Salinas. 
Gibson, Hazel G.. Asst. Sacramento County 

Free Library, Sacramento. 
Gleason, Celia, Ln. Los Angeles County 

Free Library, Los Angeles. 
Greene, Charles S., Ln. Free Library, Oak- 
land. 
Gregory, Marion L., Asst. Kings County 

Free Library, Hanford. 
Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. San Diego County Free 

Library, San Diego. 
Huntington, Stella, Ln. Santa Clara County 

Free Library, San Jose. 
Kobler, Marjorie H, Asst. San Diego 

County Free Library, San Diego. 
Kyle, Eleanore, Ln. Kings County Free 

Library, Hanford. 
Laugenour, Nancy C, Ln. Yolo County 

Free Library, Woodland. 



4— 182GS 



192 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 
bara Free Public Library and Santa 
Barbara County Free Library, Santa 
Barbara. 

Livingston, Margaret E., Ln. Orange 
County Free Library, Santa Ana. 

McCardle, Sarah E., Ln. Fresno County 
Free Library, Fresno. 

Middleton, Maude, Ln. Glenn County Free 
Library, Willows. 

Mumm, Beulah, Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 

Packer, Ella, Asst. Colusa County Free 
Library, Colusa. 

Rea, Robert, Ln. Public Library, San 
Francisco. 

Stevens, Elizabeth, Ln. Tehama County 
Free Library, Red Bluff. 

Thomas, Mabel W., Asst. Ln. Free Li- 
brary, Oakland. 

Topping, Elizabeth R., Ln. Ventura 
County Free Library, Ventura. 

Vogleson, Helen E., Asst. Ln. Los Angeles 
County Free Library, Los Angeles. 

Warren, Althea H., Ln. Public Library, 
San Diego. 

Second Grade. 

Bacon, Mrs Virginia C, Ln. Park College, 

Parkville, Mo. 
Dold, Margaret E., Asst. State Teachers 

College Library, San Francisco. 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita, Ln. Plumas 

County Free Library, Quincy. 
Encking, Louise F., Asst. Public Library, 

Seattle, Wash. 
Evving. Marion J., Asst. Pomona College 

Library, Claremont. 
Faulkner, Mrs Mabel F., Asst. Riverside 

Public Library, Riverside. 
Gantz, Flo A., Ln. San Luis Obispo 

County Free Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Hewitt, Edna J., Ln. Sutter County Free 

Library, Tuba City. 
McCright, Edith C, Asst. Public Library, 

El Paso, Texas. 
McNeill, Norah. Ln. Public Library, Rich- 
mond. 
Margrave, Anne, Ln. Inyo County Free 

Library, Independence. 
Martin, Lenala A., Ln. Lassen County Free 

Library, Susanville. 
Northey, Delia F., State School Library 

Supervisor, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Regnart, Mrs Ora M., Ln. San Benito 

County Free Library, Hollister. 
Rowland, Helen M., Ln. Tuolumne 

County Free Library, Snnora. 
Schaer, Mildred E., Asst. Public Library, 

LcJs Angeles. 
Thompson, Laura E., Asst. Public Library, 

Los Angeles. 
Wheaton, Florence J., Asst. Kern County 

Free Library. Bakersfield. 
Whitbeck, Josephine L., Asst. City Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 
Worden. Mrs Dorothy (Clarke). Mrs 

Charles J. Worden, Ln. Colusa County 

Free Library, Colusa. 



Third Grade. 

Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 
Free Library, Alturas. 



At Present Out of Library Work. 

Alexander, Mrs Lela (Clapper ton) (New 

certificate). 
De Witt, Mrs Isabelle (Park), Mrs Ralph 

E. De Witt (2d grade). 
Downey, Mrs Persis (Mclntire), Mrs 

Stephen W. Downey (2d grade). 
Jamieson, Mrs Dorothy (Henderson), 

Mrs Natt F. Jamieson (2d grade). 
Lewis, Mrs Anna Jean (Thomson), Mrs 

R. B. Lewis (New certificate). 
McMayburns, Mrs Hazel (Askey), Mrs 

Walter C. McMayburns (2d grade). 
Percival, Mrs Marion (Schumacher), Mrs 

H. Frederic Percival (2d grade). 
Price, Mrs Eunice (Steele), Mrs Jay H. 

Price (2d grade). 
Smith. Mrs Mary Pierce (2d grade). 
Twaddle, Mrs Bessie (Herrman) (1st 

grade). 
Work, Mrs Geraldine (Graham), Mrs 

George A. Work (2d grade). 
Yates, Mrs Bess (Ranton), Mrs John D. 
Tates (2d grade). 

COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library law 
and circular of information for applicants 
for certificates of qualification to hold 
office of county librarian in California" 
was published in News Notes of Califor- 
nia Libraries, April, 1911, and later re- 
printed in pamohlet form. The edition 
being exhausted, a revised edition of the 
circular was printed in Neics Notes of 
California Libraries, January, 1914. This 
has been reprinted as a pamphlet. The 
fifth edition was issued December, 1921. 
(Circular of information only.) The 
fourth edition of the County free library 
law was also issued in December, 1921. 
Copies of both of above pamphlets will be 
furnished on request. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

The next examination will be held in 
Sacramento, May 19, 1922, and in Los 
Angeles, June 10, 1922. The examina- 
tion will not be given in a locality if 
fewer than three apply to take it there. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chair- 
man of the Beard. For application blanks 
or further information address the Chair- 
man of the Board, Milton J. Ferguson, 
State Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



193 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California 
State Library was signed by Governor 
Peter H. Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Septem- 
ber 4, 1913. 

California State Library School was 
discontinued by motion adopted May 22, 
1920. 

Annual income for 1921-22, $152,950. 

Total accessions 235,829 (less 2S51 lost 
and discarded = 232, 97S) exclusive of 
14,222 accessions in Books for the Blind 
Department, and of the Sutro Branch in 
San Francisco (estimated at about 
121,27S vols.). 

STAFF. 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 

Miss Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Libra- 
-ian and Head of Books for the Blind 
Department. 

Mrs Laura Steffens Suggett, Librarian, 
Sutro Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Eudora Gai^outte, Head of Cali- 
fornia Department. 

Miss Alice J. Haines, Head of Docu- 
ments Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, County 
Library Organizer. 

Miss Annie Lowry, in charge of Period- 
icals and Binding. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Head of Shipping, Re- 
pairs, etc., Department. 

Miss Beulah Mumm, Reference Libra- 
rian. 

Miss Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Joseph H. Quire, Law and Legislative 
Reference Librarian. 

Miss Myrtle Ruhl, in charge of Order 
Department. 

Miss Marion Anderson, Assistant. 

Miss Beryl Andrews. Assistant. 

Miss Joyce Backus, Assistant. 

Miss Helen M. Bruner, Assistant. 

Miss Rosa F. Butler, Assistant. 

Miss Alice Chenu, Assistant. 

Miss Ella A. Clark, Indexer. 

Miss Bennetta Colton, Stenographer. 

Miss Anna Creaner, Assistant. 

Mrs Gerna R. Dickson, Assistant. 

Miss Lucile E. Ernst, Assistant. 

Miss Kate M. Foley, Home Teacher of 
the Blind. Sutro Branch, California State 
Library. San Francisco. 

Miss Zilla Grant, Assistant. 

Miss Frances Haub, Assistant. 

Miss Bessie B. Heath, Assistant. 

Miss Margaret Kilgariff, Assistant. 

Miss Anita Knopf, Stenographer, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Florence Lamb, Bookkeeper. 

Miss Marie Lamont, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 



Miss Rachel G. Look, Assistant. 

Miss Anna McAnear, Stenographer. 

Miss N. Ruth McCullough, Assistant. 

Miss Dorothy McGillivray, Assistant. 

Miss Beth Mclntire, Assistant. 

Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin, Assistant, 
Sutro Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Laura M. Manhart, Assistant. 

Miss D. Florence Montfort, Assistant. 

Miss Catharine J. Morrison, Home 
Teacher of the Blind, 951 El Molino St., 
Los Angeles. 

Mrs xMarion S. rercival, Assistant. 

H. C. Peterson, Collector of Californi- 
ana. 

Miss Mary V. Provines, Assistant. 

Miss Irene E. Ryan, Assistant. 

Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Assistant. 

Miss Grace Taylor, Assistant. 

Miss Lily Tilden, Assistant. 

Mrs Olive M. Treichler, Assistant. 

Miss Marguerite Walker, Stenographer. 

Miss Caroline Wenzel, Assistant. 

Miss Mae Davies, Book Repairer. 

Miss Emma F. de Merritt, Book Re- 
pairer. 

Mrs The! ma Foss, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Mae Moore, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Wilma Scott, Book Repairer. 

Wm. G. Lyons, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Wyman L. Pease, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Charles Tevis Edwards, Messenger. 

Lincoln Fitzell, Messenger (Part-time). 

Angelena Grant, Messenger. 

Elenora Kaeuper, Messenger. 

Alice Miller, Messenger (Part-time). 

Louise Reynolds, Messenger. 

J. L. Foss, Janitor. 

G. A. Klees, Janitor. 

Albert Oughten, Truck Driver. 

R. N. Polmere, Jauitor. 

Harry A. Simons, Elevator Operator. 



STAFF NEWS ITEMS. 

During the quarter the following addi- 
tions to the staff were made : Mrs 
Marion Schumacher Percival began 
March 1 as temporary help in the Refer- 
ence Department ; Miss Dorothy Mc- 
Gillivray, February 15 ; Angelena Grant 
began again as messenger March 9. Mrs 
Miriam Purcell, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Washington Library course, 
worked in the Catalog Department from 
January 17 to February 15. Mr George 
C. King was on the staff from January 
3 to March 31 to assist in taking the 
biennial inventory. 



194 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days 9 a.m. to 5 p.m 

Legislative session : 

Week days 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

LAW AND LEGISLATIVE REFER- 
ENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Joseph H. Quire, in charge. 

The Law and Legislative Reference 
Department is fully equipped with the 
latest reports, digests, encyclopedias and 
textbooks, the statutes of other states, the 
United States, Great Britain, Canada, 
Australia and certain other foreign coun- 
tries, and briefs of counsel in cases de- 
cided in the California Supreme and 
Appellate courts. State officers are en- 
titled to borrow books, and private indi- 
viduals are accorded the same privilege 
upon presentation of a request signed by 
a Supreme, Appellate or Superior Judge, 
or other state officer. Books may be kept 
three weeks, and will be once renewed 
for two weeks. All books are subject to 
recall, if required by a state officer. 

In addition to special service to mem- 
bers of the Legislature, information on 
the laws of California and other states 
and countries is given on inquiry from 
libraries or individuals. 

Recent accessions to the department 
will be found listed under the heading 
"Law" in the section on "Recent Acces- 
sions." 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Recent accessions of California State 
and City publications will be found on 
pages 235, 238. 

Copies of 37 California state publica- 
tions have been received for distribution 
to libraries during January, February 
and March, 1922. 

Agriculture Bd. List of exhibitors at 

State Fair. 1921. 
Agriculture Dept. Monthly bull., vol 10, 

nos. 10-12 ; vol. 11, nos. 1-3. 

Agricultural statutes, 1921. pts. 

1-2. 

— ■ Animal Industry Div. Rept. 1921. 

— ! Directory of nurserymen, 1921-22. 

Special publication, no. 19. 

Banks Supt. Annual report. 1921. 
Charities & Corrections Bd. Biennial re- 
port. 1918-20. 

Control Bd. California and the Oriental, 
rev. 1922. 

Controller. Inheritance tax act. 1921. 

Education Bd. Directory bull. 1921-22. 

Finance Dept. Juvenile court law, sup- 
plement. 1921. 



Forestry Bd. Forest fire laws and regu- 
lations. 1921. 

Shade and ornamental trees of 



Cal. safety 



California. 
Industrial Accident Comm. 

news, vol. 6, nos. 1-3. 
Labor Bur. Labor laws. 1921. 

Laws pertaining to the employ- 
ment of children. 1922. 

Legislative Counsel Bur. Constitution of 

California. 1922. 
Mining Bur. Bulletin no. 89. 

Monthly chapter of 18th report, 

Jan.-Feb., 1922. 

Preliminary report, no. 8. 

Cal, oil fields, vol. 7, nos. 5-7. 

Motor Vehicle Dept. Cuts of approved 

headlight devices. 1921. 

Public Instruction Supt. Bull. no. 6. 

Railroad Comm. Regulation of public 
utilities. 

Real Estate Dept. Directory-bulletin, 
vol. 3, no. 1. 

San Francisco Teachers College. Pre- 
liminary announcements of summer 
session. 1922. 

Surveyor General. Rules and regula- 
tions, oil and gas permits and leases. 
1922. 

Veterans' Home. Annual report. 1921. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Beulah Mumm, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on request of the 
librarian, and to any other educational 
institution on request of its official head 
or its librarian ; to individuals through the 
signature of a state officer, of the Li- 
brarian of the local library or of the 
official head of any other educational in- 
stitution or on receipt of a $5.00 deposit ; 
to a club or grange on request of its presi- 
dent, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 

In view of the fact that there have 
been questions recently concerning the 
routine of State Library service, it 
seems desirable to outline the method the 
State Library recommends. 

Make out all request slips in triplicate. 

Send two copies to State Library. One 
of these is returned to the borrowing li- 
brary ; the other is kept as a permanent 
record at the State Library. 

Keep one copy on file at library under 
heading "Requests from the State Li- 
brary." 

When request slip is returned from 
State Library, file it in "date due" file 
and after book has been returned, in 
permanent author or subject file of 
material in State Library. 

Two days before book is due notice 
should be sent to State Library asking 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



195 



for renewal or stating that book is be- 
ing returned. The slips should be care- 
fully filled out, giving call number, 
author and' title of each book, date sent 
and date due, and indicating plainly 
whether renewal is wanted or the book 
is being returned. 

In making out author requests, give 
author's full name, if possible, and the 
exact title of the book, with imprint. 
Use a separate slip for each title. 

In making out subject requests, give 
as much information as possible as to 
the exact phase of the subject wanted. A 
few words of explanation often means a 
great saving of time. 

For each package of books sent out 
a double postal is typed, listing each 
item in the package. If the shipment is 
to the main office the return postal is 
addressed to the State Library, but if 
the shipment is to a branch, the return 
postal is addressed to the county library. 
After this is received at headquarters it 
should be sent on to the State Library. 
Thus the county library is notified that 
the branch has received the desired books 
and the State Library gets a receipt for 
all shipments sent out. 

The duplicate request slip, filled out at 
the State Library, is always returned 
to headquarters. If the book is in the 
State Library only the call number is 
added to this slip. If the book is not 
in the State Library, the place, pub- 
lisher, date and price are added, if the 
book can be located in any bibliographies, 
and the names of libraries owning the 
book, as indicated in the Union Catalog. 

With the return postal a duplicate slip 
is typed which is filed at the State Li- 
brary under date due. When the books 
are returned this slip is stamped and 
sent to the main office as a receipt. It 
is suggested that librarians preserve these 
receipts to settle possible questions about 
missing books. 

Attention to these details will add to 
the speed and general efficiency of the 
service. 



ORDER AND ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge. 

During January, February and March 
ISSO books, 44 prints and 1 map were 
accessioned. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Munson, in charge. 

During January, February and March 
1066 books were cataloged and 9047 cards 
were added to the file. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

Eudora Garoutte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of books 
on the history and description, resources 
and industries of the State, as well as the 
works of California authors in all de- 
partments of literature. These are made 
accessible by means of a card catalog. 
Full names and biographical sketches of 
California authors, artists, musicians, 
pioneers and early settlers are being 
secured, together with their photographs. 
The collection of bound periodicals is 
quite large. The Department also con- 
tains about 7000 bound volumes of news- 
papers, a file of which is being indexed 
with reference to the history of the State. 
Students will be assisted in their work. 

Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

Daniel Rhoads, a native of Illinois, 
arrived in the Sacramento Valley in 
1846. Unlike many of those who came 
in the early days he accumulated a 
large portion of this world's goods and 
at the time of his death in 1895 was con- 
nected officially with several banks and 
was also the owner of several ranches. 
Mr Rhoads was a member of the rescuing 
party that went to the relief of the 
Donner party. This alone would give 
him a prominent place in the early his- 
tory of California. 

A very interesting card has been re- 
ceived from Nathan Hall Gregory, now 
living at Bodie. Mr Gregory is a cattle- 
man and has had many interesting ad- 
ventures both in Nevada and California. 
Other cards received are those of George 
Riley Moore and John William Rhoads. 



196 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



California Authors. 

The following author cards have been 

received since the last issue of Neivs Notes 

of California Libraries: 

Adams, Richard Laban 
Beaumont, Gerald Paul 
Beeson, William James 

* Brewer, William Augustus, Jr. 

* Browning, Eunice Beatrix 
*Casey, (James) Patrick 
*Casey, (Eimond) Terence 

Church, Thomas Dolliver 

Daniels, Paul I. 

Dermody, Daniel Elmer 

Estanol, Jorge "Vera 

Fabijanovic, Stephanus 

Gaw, Allison 

Molnar, Louis 

Archibald, Mrs Katherine (Mullen) 

Mrs Edward Murray Archibald 
Norton, Brayton Saltonstall 
*Spencer, Mrs Fanny (Bixby) 

Mrs W Carl Spencer 
Tucker, Prentiss 
White, George Starr 
Wotherspoon, Mrs Marion (Foster) 

Mrs "William A. Wotherspoon 

California Musicians. 

The following musician cards have been 

received since the last issue of News Notes 

of California Libraries: 

*De Fremery, "Virginia 
Bacon, Fred Albert 
Reeves-Barnard, Mrs Maud 

Mrs C. E. Barnard 
Hart, Bertha Eloise 
Rothwell, Mrs Elizabeth (Wolff) 

Mrs Walter Henry Rothwell 

California Artists. 

The following artist cards have been 
received since the last issue of News 
Notes of California Libraries: 

Ellis, Fremont F. 
Herrick, Hugh M. 
McDurfie, Jane Lee 
Tew, Marguerite 
Wamsley, Frank C. 

Newspaper Index. 

The index covers the period from 
August 15, 1846, to date. 

Catalog. 

Two hundred and forty - four cards 
have been added to the California catalog 
during the last quarter. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND DEPART- 
MENT. 
Mabel R. Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in the various types 
are sent to any blind resident in Cali- 
fornia upon application. Circular and 



finding list, with Call slip postal, will be 
sent on request. Writing appliances and 
games for the blind are loaned as samples 
to those wishing to buy such articles, so 
that the different kinds can be tried 
before they are ordered. Addresses of 
firms supplying all articles loaned will be 
furnished on request. 

Books sent to individuals from an in- 
stitution distributing embossed literature 
are carried free through the mails. 

Embossed catalogs in American Braille, 
Moon, and New York point are now 
available. They will be loaned to bor- 
rowers wishing them for use in book 
selection. 

The State Library will be glad to have 
borrowers who care to do so write any 
letters or requests for books to the Li- 
brary in Braille or New York point. 

The first book was loaned June 13, 
1905. There are now 1710 blind bor- 
rowers, 46 borrowers having been added 
during January, February and March. 
Total accessions are 14,222 as follows : 
New York point books 2308; New York 
point music 184 ; American Braille books 
2057 ; American Braille music 1171 ; 
European Braille books 2038; European 
Braille music 149 ; Moon books 3586 ; 
Moon music 3 : Revised Braille Grade 1J 
books 1025 ; Revised Braille Grade li 
music 108 ; Standard dot books 16 ; Line 
books 192 ; Line music 21 ; Ink print 
books 302 ; * Appliances 81 ; *Games 46 ; 
Maps 33. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the last three months by F. B. 
Beans. J. S. Bright, Mrs A. H. Clise, 
Miss Kate M. Foley, Ruby Holtz, Miss 
Bessie Long. Mrs Rose McComb, Wm. 
A. Miller, John O'Donnell, Mrs M. E. 
Phillips. Mrs L. Sargent, George W. 
Shoemaker. William Thomas. Helen 
Webster, Canadian National Institute 
for the Blind, Christian Record Pub- 
lishing Co., Free Gospel Library for the 
Blind. Joseph Gockel, Pennsylvania In- 
stitution for the Blind, Society for the 
Aid of the Sightless, Xavier Free Publi- 
cation Society for the Blind, Ziegler Pub- 
lishing Co. 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
books, etc., which have been added to the 
library during the last six months. See 

page 238. 

During January, February and March 
S18S books, etc., were loaned as follows : 



*Native Californians. 



*Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



197 



New York point 831 ; American Braille 
1210; European Braille 1381; Moon 
3351; Revised Braille Grade U 1401; 
Standard dot ; Line 5 ; Ink print books 
3 ; Appliances 5 ; Maps ; Games 1. 
The loans were divided by class as fol- 
lows : Philosophy and religion 550 ; soci- 
ology 69 ; language 55 ; primers 93 ; sci- 
ence 109 ; useful arts 100 ; fine arts 3 ; 
amusements 2 ; music 203 ; literature 
315 ; fiction 4689 ; travel and history 
661 : biography 353 ; periodicals 986. 

Home Teaching. 

Miss Foley, home teacher of the blind, 
is at the Sutro Branch of the State 
Library, Sacramento and Webster 
streets. San Francisco, every Thursday 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. She gives lessons 
regularly in Alameda, Berkeley, Oakland, 
Palo Alto, San Bruno, San Jose, Santa 
Clara and other places in that vicinity. 
Miss Morrison, home teacher of the blind, 
is at the Los Angeles County Free Li- 
brary, Broadway Annex, Hall of Records, 
on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons 
from 1.30 until 5.30 o'clock. She gives 
lessons regularly in Los Angeles and 
nearby places. 

From January 1 to March 31 they 
gave 365 lessons in the homes of the 
blind and 1S4 lessons at the libraries and 
institutions on the 63 afternoons they 
spent in them. Miss Foley and Miss 
Morrison have made 141 visits and calls 
in connection with the work for purposes 
other than giving lessons, and received 
34 visits in connection with the work. 

During the quarter Miss Foley and 
Miss Morrison spent 170 hours on cor- 
respondence and preparing lessons. They 
wrote 311 letters and 172 postals and 
received 232 letters and 37 postals. They 
also answered and made 446 telephone 
calls. They made 4 addresses. Miss 
Foley teaches regularly in Oakland a 
class of seeing people to write Braille. 
The various other activities in connec- 
tion with the work of the home teachers 
can not be easily tabulated. 

Miss Foley spoke before the Hill Club 
in Oakland in January. In February 
she gave a lecture at Lane Hospital. 
It was one of a series of lectures given 
there this year to the public. In March 
she spoke before the Study Club at the 
Methodist church in Oakland and to the 
scholars and teachers in the Denman 
School, San Francisco. 



The first sight-saving class in the West 
will start in San Francisco on April 3. 

Persons who know of possible pupils 
anywhere in Orange, Los Angeles or San 
Diego counties are urged to communicate 
with Miss Catharine J. Morrison, 951 
El Molino st., Los Angeles (telephone 
Wilshire 5339) ; and anywhere around 
the bay, with Miss Kate M. Foley, Sutro 
Branch, State Library, Sacramento and 
Webster streets, San Francisco (telephone 
West 3046). About prospective pupils 
in other localities, write direct to the 
State Library, Sacramento. 

SUTRO BRANCH. 
Mrs Laura Steffexs Suggett, in 

charge. 

The Sutro Branch occupies the top 
floor of the Lane Medical Library Build- 
ing. Sacramento and Webster streets, San 
Francisco, and is open every day except 
Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

See page 171. 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 
SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Miss Esther M. Bomgardner, San Diego, 

Cal. 

'15. Asst. Public School L., Los Angeles, 
Miss Thelma Brackett, San Diego, Cal. 

'20. Ln. Siskiyou Co. F. L., Yreka. 
Miss Helen V. Briggs, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Agnes E. Brown, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'15. Asst. Washington State College 
Library, Pullman, Wash. 
Miss Helen M. Bruner. Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Lucile Huff Buchan, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Mrs Virginia Clowe Bullis, Woodland, Cal. 

'IT. Out of library work. 
Miss Ruth E. Bullock, Redlands, Cal. 

'15. Asst. P. L. Redlands. 
Miss Katharine Cahoon, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Hilo Co. F. L., Hilo, T. H. 
Miss Elta L. Camper, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Univ. of Cal. L., Berkeley. 
Miss Blanche Chalfant, Bishop, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Yolo Co. F. L., Woodland. 
Miss Marguerite Chatfield, Pasadena, Cal. 

'20. Asst. P. L., Sacramento. 
Miss Nellie E. Christensen, Selma, Cal. 

'19. Asst. Fresno Co. F. L., Fresno. 
Miss Mabel Coulter, Salinas, Cal. 

'14. Asst Contra Costa Co. F. L., Mar- 
tinez. 
Miss Helen Esther Crawford, Winters, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Miss Dorotha Davis, Los Angeles, Cal. 

'17. Ln. Fresno High School L.. Fresno. 
Miss Tillie de Bernardi, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Estella De Ford, National City, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Napa Co. F. L., Napa. 
Miss Margaret Dennison, Alameda, Cal. 

'17. Temp. Cataloger P. L., Turlock, 
Cal. 



198 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Miss Abbie Doughty, San Luis Obispo, Cal. 
'20. Teacher-Ln. Bonita Union High 
School, La "Verne. 
Miss Ellen B. Frink, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'19. Asst. Monterey Co. F. L., Salinas. 
Miss Flo A. Gantz, Pomona, Cal. 

'20. Ln. San Luis Obispo Co. F. L., 
San Luis Obispo. 
Miss Beatrice Y. Gawne, Berkeley, Cal. 
'17. Ln. Salinas Union High School L., 
Salinas. 
Miss Hazel G. Gibson, Santa Monica, Cal. 
'19. Asst. Sacramento Co. F. L., Sac- 
ramento. 
Miss Margaret "V. Girdner, Sacramento. 
'17. Ln. Palo Alto High School L., Palo 
Alto. 
Miss Mary E. Glock, Madera, Cal. 

'15. Died, March 6, 1922. 
Miss Bernice L. Goff, San Jose, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould, Woodland, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Mrs MiMred Kellogg Hargis, Salinas, Cal. 

'18. Out of library work. 
Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss, Hood River, 
Oregon. 
'15. Out of library work. 
Miss Margaret Hatch, Santa Rosa, Cal. 
'15. Ln. Standard Oil Co. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Miss Frances Haub, Sacramento, Cal. 

'20. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Bessie B. Heath, Michigan Bar, Cal 

'19. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Hazel Meddaugh Heffner, Stockton, 
Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Cecilia Henderson, Santa Paula, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Edna S. Holroyd, Hanford, Cal. 
'15. Ln. San Mateo Co. F. L., Redwood 
City. 
Mrs Helen Hopwood Judd, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Miss Helen Katherine Kellogg, Salinas, 
Cal. 
'19. With Nichols Publishing Co., New 
York City. 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy, Elk 
Grove, Cal. 
'15. Out of library work. 
Mrs A'geline Marlow Lawson, San Diego, 
Cal. 
'IS. Asst. P. L., San Diego. 
Miss Mar jorie C. . Learned, Pasadena, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Miss Amy G. Luke, Willows, Cal. 

'15. Out of library work. 
Miss Everett I. McCullough, Berkeley, Cal. 

'19. Asst. Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 
Miss N. Ruth McCullough, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell, Modesto, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin, Lamanda Park, 
Cal. 
'17. Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San 
Francisco. 
Miss Anne Margrave, Santa Barbara, Cal. 

'14. Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., Independence. 
Miss Lenala Martin, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., Susanville. 
Miss Vera V. Mitchell, Oakland, Cal. 
'19. Ln. Piedmont High School L., 
Piedmont. 
Miss Marion Morse, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Ln. Maui Co. F. L., Wailuku, T. H. 
Mrs Alice Moore Patton, Los Gatos, Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 



Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival, Han- 
ford, Cal. 
'15. Temp. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, Modesto, Cal. 
'14. Asst. Beale Memorial L., Bakers- 
field. 
Miss Margaret L. Potter, Oakland, Cal. 
'16. Asst. Stanford Univ. L., Stanford 
Univ. 
Mrs Eunice Steele Price, Berkeley, Cal. 

'16. Out of library work. 
Mrs Beatrice Brasefield Rakestraw, Palo 
Alto, Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Esther L. Ramont, Modesto, Cal. 
'20. Ln. Modesto High School L., 
Modesto. 
Miss Anna Belle Robinson, Claremont, Cal. 

'18. Died, June 22, 1920. 
Miss Myrtle Ruhl, Redwood City, Cal. 
'14. Head of Order Dept., State L., 
Sacramento. 
Miss Marguerite C. Ryan, San Jose, Cal. 
'19. Ln. Campbell Union High School 
L., Campbell. 
Miss Georgia Pearl Seeker, Fresno, Cal. 
'19. Asst. Stanford Univ. L., Stanford 
Univ. 
Miss Ruth Seymour, Mill Valley, Cal. 
'IS. Ln. Tamalpais Union High School 
L., Mill Valley. 
Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Lodi, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Edith Edenborg Smalley, Muroc, Cal. 

'IS. Out of library work. 
Mrs Edna Bell Smith, Fairoaks, Cal. 

'17. Out of library work. 
Mrs Elizabeth Snyder Smith, Berkeley, 
Cal. ' 
'20. Out of library work. 
Mrs Vivian Gregory Smith, Woodland, Cal. 
'14. Ln. Security Trust and Savings 
Bank, Los Angeles. 
Mrs Rosamond Bradbury Waithman, Santa 
Barbara, Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Caroline Wenzel, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Josephine L. Whitbeck, Richmond, 
Cal. 
'16. Asst. P. L., Sacramento. 
Miss Essie T. White, Broderick, Cal. 

'19. Out of library work. 
Miss Aldine Winham, Salinas, Cal. 

'20. Ln. State Teachers College L., 
Santa Barbara. 
Mrs Dorothy Clarke Worden, Sacramento, 
Cal. 
'15. Ln. Colusa Co. F. L., Colusa. 
Mrs Bess Ranton Yates, Long Beach, Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 



News Items. 

Miss Cecilia Henderson, '14, is teach- 
ing this year in Inyo county at the 
Tower Plant school. 

Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, '14, has 
taken a position in the Beale Memorial 
Library at Bakersfield. 

Mr and Mrs William Hargis (Mildred 
Kellogg, '18), have a son, born January 
22, 1922. 



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CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



199 



Miss Lucile Huff, '20, was married 
to Dean Winslow Buchan on the eve- 
ning of March 11. Mr Buchan is vice 
president of the First National Bank 
of Palo Alto, and a Stanford graduate 
with the class of 1910. Mr and Mrs 
Buchan will make their home in Palo 
Alto. 

MARY ELLA GLOCK. 

Again it becomes our sad duty to re- 
cord the passing of a graduate of the 
California State Library School. Mary 
Ella Glock died March 6, 1922. Foi 
several months she had suffered from the 
malady which brought her life to a close ; 
and while it had, for some time, seemed 
improbable that she would recover, still 
her fortitude and courage were so bound- 
less that hope of her cure continued to 
well in the hearts of her friends. 

Miss Glock entered the State Library 
School with the class of 1915. She did 
her work from day to day with unvary- 
ing faithfulness. No one could evei 
question her motives or doubt her sincer- 
ity. She looked upon her chosen pro- 
fession of librarianship as a distinct 
opportunity of service to society. In re- 
plying to the question of why she wished 
to enter the county library field, she said 
that she desired to broaden the scope of 
her work. This conviction had evidently 
been the guiding light of her life for 
years, because each step she took was not 
in the direction of ease or comfort but 
towards greater efficiency and a broader 
opportunity. With her return to Madera 
she entered upon the most fruitful years 
of her life. Had fate spared her, she 
would, without doubt, have grown as 
time went by ; but what she was, what 
she stood for, was never in question. 

The ways of nature are sometimes hard 
to understand ; never more so than in 
an instance such as this one. Whatever 
we think, we must, however, admire the 
spirit of a girl who, despite great handi- 
cap, never lost her determination and 
her courage. Wasted though she might 
be by disease, her heart beat on, her will 
was not broken. She made the good 
fight ; and her example ought to be an 
inspiration to those of us who in health 
and strength sometimes permit our aim 
to become blurred, who through sheer 
inertia, lose the will to serve. 



It was good to have known Mary 
Glock. There was a broad streak of 
sunshine in her being. We shall miss 
her presence from our ranks ; but our 
memories of her are all bright and 
helpful. 

Milton J. Ferguson. 

RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During Jan- 
uary, February and March, 1922. 

The last number of the Quarterly 
Bulletin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of vol. 4, 
covering the accessions for September- 
December. 1905. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in Netos Notes of 
California Libraries. 

The last list of recent accessions ap- 
peared in the January, 1922, issue of 
this publication. 

GENERAL WORKS. 

American-Scandinavian foundation. 
A list of five hundred books by Scan- 
dinavians and about Scandinavia. 

1921. 016.8395 A51 
Gift of American - Scandinavian 

foundation. 

Dana, John Cotton. 

Suggestions. 1921. (Useful reference 
series, no. 24.) x020.2 D16s 

Fowler, Harry Alfred. 

Bookplates for beginners. 1922. 

q097 F7 
Hyde, Dorsey William. 

Special libraries directory. 1921. 

x026 H99s 
Jordan, Louis Henry. 

Comparative religion, a survey of its 
recent literature. 1920. 016.2 J 82 

Park, Robert Ezra. 

The immigrant press and its control. 

1922. (Americanization studies.) 

071 P23 
Porter, James Edward. 

The activated sludge process of sew- 
age treatment ; a bibliography. 1921. 
016.6283 P84 
Power, Ralph Lester, ed. 

Libraries of Los Angeles and vicinity. 
cl921. c027 P88 

Gift of author. 



200 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Ticek, Winifred Fleming. 

Advertising the public library. cl921. 
x021.7 T55 

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

Alexander, Samuel. 

Space, time, and deity. 1920. 2 v. 
(The Gifford lectures.) 113 A37 

Bradby, M. K. 

The logic of the unconscious mind. 
1920. (Oxford medical publications.) 
160 B79 
Buethogge, Richard. 

The philosophical writings of Richard 
Burthogge. 1920. 192 B97 

Dunlap, Knight. 

Mysticism, Freudianism and scientific 
psychology. 1920. 149.3 D92 



Fawcett, Edward Douglas. 
Divine imagining. 1921. 



110 F25d 



Funk, John Clarence. 

Vice and health, problems — solutions. 
cl921. 176 F98 

Heath, Arthur George. 

The moral and social significance of 
the conception of personality. 1921. 
126 H43 
Hollander, Bernard. 

In search of the soul and the mechan- 
ism of thought, emotion, and con 
duct. 2 v. 109 H737 

Joyce, George Hayward. 

Principles of logic. 1920. (Stonyhurst 
philosophical series.) 160 J 89 

Kilner, Walter John. 

The human atmosphere (the aura). 

1920. 134 K48 

Ludovici. Anthony Mario. 

Man's descent from the gods ; or, The 
complete case against prohibition. 

1921. 178 L94 

Myerson, Abraham. 

The foundations of personality. 1921. 

126 M99 
Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. 

Selected letters of Friedrich Nietzsche. 
1921. 193 N67zle 

O'Shea, Michael Vincent. 

First steps in child training. cl920. 
(The parent's library.) 136.7 OS2f 



Rtjggiero. Guido de. 

Modern philosophy. [1921] (Library 
of philosophy.) 195 R93 

Troward, Thomas. 

The hidden power, and other papers 
upon mental science. 1921. 

131 T86h 

W t ang Yang-ming. 

The philosophy of Wang Yang-ming. 
1916. 181.1 W246 



Whitehead, Harold. 
Your job. 1920. 



174 W59 



A young girl's diary, prefaced with a 
letter by Sigmund Freud. Tr. from 
the German by Eden and Cedar 
Paul. [1921] 173 Y68 

RELIGION. 

Abbas Effendi (Abdul Baha). 

Abdul Baha on divine philosophy. 
cl918. 299 A12d 

Gift of Bahai library comm. 

Abul-Fazl, mirsa. 

The brilliant proof (Burhiine lame). 
1912, 299 A16 

Gift of Bahai library comm. 

Arnold-Forster, Frances Egerton. 
The hymn-book of the church. 1920. 

223.2 A76 

Bible. O. T. Song of Solomon. English. 
The Song of songs. 1921. 223.9 B58j 

Borel, Henri. 

The rhythm of life, based on the philos- 
ophy of Laou-Tse. 1921. (W T isdom 
of the East.) 299 B73 

Browne, Laurence Edward. 

Early Judaism. 1920. 296 B88 

Campbell, Reginald John. 

The life of Christ. 1921. 232 C18 

Colum, Padraic. 

The golden fleece and the heroes who 
lived before Achilles. cl921. 

292 C72 

Deanesly, Margaret. 

The Lollard Bible and other medieval 

Biblical versions. 1920. (Cambridge 

studies in medieval life and thought.) 

220.5 D28 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



201 



Driver, Samuel Rolles & Gray, George 

Buchanan. 

A critical and exegetical commentary 

of the book of Job, together with a 

new translation. 1921. 2 v. (The 

international critical commentary.) 

223.1 D78 

Fenn, William Wallace. 

Immortality and theism. 1921. ( In- 
ge rsoll lectures.) 218 F33 

Figgis, John Neville. 

The political aspects of S. Augustine's 
"City of God." 1921. 208 A92zf 

Fox, Henry Elliott. 

Christian inscriptions in ancient Rome. 
1920. 246 F79 

Graham, John William. 

The faith of a Quaker. 1920. 

289.6 G73 
Holley, Horace. 

Bahai, the spirit of the age. cl921. 

299 H73b 
Lake, Kirsopp. 

Landmarks in the history of early 
Christianity. 1920. 225 L19 

Luce, Arthur Aston. 

Monophysitism, past and present. 

1920. 232 L93 

Martin, Alfred Wilhelm. 

The world's great religions and the 
religion of the future. 1921. 

209 M37 
Peabody, Francis Greenwood. 

Sundays in college chapels since the 
war ; sermons and addresses. 1921. 
(The college chapel series.) 

252 P35ls 
Smith, Lucy Margaret. 

The early history of the monastery of 
Cluny. 1920'. 271 S65 

Snowden, James Henry. 

The truth about Christian science. 

1921. 289.9 S67 

Spence, Lewis. 

An introduction to mythology. 1921. 

291 S74 
Stewart, David Alexander. 

The place of Christianity among the 

greater religions of the world. 1920. 

232 S84 



Vogt, Yon Ogden. 
Art and religion. 1921. 



246 V88 



Worcester priory. 

The Worcester Liber albus ; glimpses 
of life in a great Benedictine monas- 
tery in the fourteenth century. 1920. 
271.1 W92w 

Young, Philip Norton Frushard, & Fer- 
rers, Agnes. 
India in conflict. 1920. 266 Y75 

SOCIOLOGY: GENERAL. 

Banca commerciale italiana, Milan. 
Cenni statistici sul movimento econo- 
mico dell'Italia. 1921. 310 B213a 

Bogardus, Emory Stephen. 

Methods of training social workers. 
1921. c307 B67 

Bureau of vocational information, New 
York. 
Statistical work ; a study of opportu- 
nities for women. 1921. (Studies in 
occupations.) 310 B95 

Ellwood, Charles Abram. 

Sociology in its psychological aspects. 
1921. 301 E47sp 

Freeman, Richard Austin. 

Social decay and regeneration. 1921. 

301 F85 
Hobson, John Atkinson. 

Problems of a new world. [1921] 

304 H684 

Park, Robert Ezra. cG Burgess, Ernest 
Watson. 
Introduction to the science of sociology. 
cl921. 301 P23 



Ratiienau, Walther. 
The new society. 1921. 



304 R23 



POLITICAL SCIENCE AND CITI- 
ZENSHIP. 

Bau, Mingchien Joshua. 

The foreign relations of China. cl921. 
327.51 B33 
Bekkson, Isaac Baer. 

Theories of Americanization. 1920. 
(Columbia university, Teachers col- 
lege. Contributions to education.) 

323.6 B51 



202 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Bulkeley, John Pierson. 
The British Empire. 1921. 

325.342 B93 
Dunning, William Archibald. 

A history of political theories from 
Luther to Montesquieu. 1921. 

320.9 D92a 

Fanning, Clara Elizabeth, comp. 

Selected articles on the election of 
United States senators. 1912. 

328.73 F21a 
Gardiner, Alfred G. 

The Anglo - American future. 1920. 
(The world of to-day.) 327 G22 

Hayes, Bridget T. 

American democracy. 1921. 

320.73 H41 
Jackson, Henry Ezekiel, cd. 

What America means to me. 1920. 
(Citizenship club series.) 323.6 J 12 

Joiinsen, Julia E., comp. 

Selected articles on the negro problem. 
1921. (The handbook series.) 

325.26 J65 
Kautsky, Karl. 

Terrorism and communism. Trans, by 
W. H. Kerridge. [1920] 323 K21 

Keith, Arthur Berriedale. 

Dominion home rule in practice. 1921. 
(The world of to-day.) 

325.342 K28d 
Laski, Harold Joseph. 

The foundations of sovereignty ; and 
other essays. 1921. 320.1 L34f 

Lord, Arthur Ritchie. 

The principles of politics. 1921. 

320 L86 

Loughran, Elizabeth W., & Madden, 
Marie Regina. 
Outline study of immigration and 
Americanization. 1921. 325.73 L88 

MacDonagh, Michael. 

The pageant of Parliament. [1921] 
2 v. 328.42 M13p 

Mariano, John Horace. 

The Italian contribution to American 
democracy, c-1921. 325.245 M33 

Mills, Joseph Travis. 

Great Britain and the United States. 
1920, 327 M65 



Robinson, Ceroid Tanquary. 

Asia's American problem. 1921. (The 
Freeman pamphlets.) 327 R66 

Smith, William George. 

A study in Canadian immigration. 
1920. 325.242 S76 

Willoughby, Westel Woodbury, & Rog- 
ers, Lindsay. 
An introduction to the problem of gov- 
ernment. 1921. 320.1 W73i 

ECONOMICS. 
Bowley, Arthur Lyon. 

The change in the distribution of the 
national income. 1920. 

330.942 B78c 
Boucke, Oswald Fred. 

The developement of economics, 1750— 
1900. 1921. 330 B75 

Carver, Thomas Nixon. 

Principles of national economy. c!921. 
330 C33pn 
Chapman, Sydney John. 

Outlines of political economy. 1921. 

330 C46o 
Clapham, John Harold. 

The economic development of France 
and Germany. 1921. 330.94 C58 

Colby, Charles Carlyle, comp. 

Source book for the economic geogra- 
phy of North America. cl921. 

330.97 C68 
Friedman, Elisha Michael, cd. 

America and the new era. cl920. 

330 F91am 

Jones, Chester Lloyd. 

Mexico and its reconstruction. 1921. 
330.972 J 76 
Mackinnon, James. 

The social and industrial history of 
Scotland, from the union to the pres- 
ent time. 1921. 330.941 M15a 

Pigou, Arthur Cecil. 

The economics of welfare. 1920. 

330 P63 
Simpson, Kemper. 

Economics for the accountant. 1921. 

330.1 S61 
Thompson, Wallace. 

Trading with Mexico. 1921. 

330.972 T47 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



203 



Van Metre. Thurman William. 

Economic history of the United States. 
1921. 330.973 V26 

LABOR. 

Bloomfield, Daniel, ed. 

Selected articles on problems of labor. 

1920. (The handbook series.) 

331.8 B655s 

Browne, Waldo Ralph, comp. 

What's what in the labor movement ; 
a dictionary of labor affairs and la- 
bor terminology. 1921. 331.8 B88 

Bullock, Edna Dean, comp. 

Selected articles on trade unions. 2d 
and enl. ed. 1916. (Debaters' 

handbook series.) 331.88 B93a 

Ciiisholm. Archibald. 

Labour's Magna charta ; a critical 
study of the labour clauses of the 
Peace treaty and of the draft con- 
ventions and recommendations of 
the Washington International ' la- 
bour conference. 1921. 331.8 C54 

Independent labour party (Gt. Brit.) 
Information committee. 
Trade unions in Soviet Russia. (1920) 
331.88 I38 

Interchurcii world movement of North 
America. 
Public opinion and the steel strike. 

1921. 331.89 I61p 

Lane, Winthrop David. 

Civil war in West Virginia. 1921. 
(The Freeman pamphlets.) 

331.88 L26 
Lowe, Boutelle Ellsworth. 

The international protection of labor. 
1921. 338.9 L91 

Lynd, Robert. 

The passion of labour. 1920. 

331.8 L98 
Solano, E. John, ed. 

Labour as an international problem. 
1920. 331.87 S68 

Stxdt, Einar Leschly Hansen Drejer. 
Imagination, labour, civilization. 1920. 

330 S95 
Williams, Whiting. 

Full up and fed up. 1921. 

331.8 W72f 



LAW AND ADMINISTRATION. 
Blymter, William Hervey. 

The isolation plan, with papers on the 
covenant. 2d ed. cl921. 

341.1 B66 

Bullard, Arthur. 

The A B C's of disarmanent and the 
Pacific problems. 1921. 341.1 B93 

Harley, John Eugene. 

The League of nations and the new 
international law. 1921. q341 H2 

Levy, Raphael Georges. 
The peace of justice. cl921. 

341.2 L66 

MacDonald, William. 

A new constitution for a new America. 
1921. 342.73 M13 

Schaltb, Lincoln Frederick cC- Isaacs, 
Nathan. 
The law in business problems ; cases 
and other materials for the study 
of legal aspects of business. 1921. 
347 S31 
Spencer, William Homer. 

Law and business. c!921. 347 S74 



COMMERCE AND COMMUNI- 
CATION. 

American commerce association. 

The traffic manual. cl921. q385 A5c 

Brown, Robert Neal Rudmose. 

The principles of economic geography. 

1920. (Pitman's economic library.) 

380 B879 
Clark, G. N. 

Unifying the world. 1920. (Interna- 
tional relations series.) 380 C59 

Clarke, Geoffrey Rothe. 

The Post office of India and its story. 

1921. 383 C59 

Cooper, Clayton Sedgwick. 

Foreign trade markets and methods. 

1922. 380 C77 

MacElwee. Roy Samuel, & Taylor, 
Thomas Rothwell. 
Wharf management, stevedoring and 
storage. 1921. (Shipping series; 
training for steamship business.) 

387 M14w 



204 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



McKay, Charles Watson. 

Telephone rates and values. cl921. 

384 M15 
Phelps, Edith M., comp. 

Selected articles on the parcels post. 
2d and rev. ed. 1913. (Debaters' 
handbook series.) 383 P53a 

Phillimore, John. 

Motor road transport for commercial 
purposes. [1920] 380 P55 

Salter, James Arthur. 

Allied shipping control ; an experiment 
in international administration. 
1921. (Carnegie endowment for in- 
ternational peace. Division of eco- 
nomics and history. (British ser- 
ies.) ) q387 S1 

Smith, William. 

The history of the post office in Brit- 
ish North America. 1920. 

q383 S6 
Zimmekmann, Erich Walter. 

Zimmermann on ocean shipping. 1921. 

387 Z73 

EDUCATION. 

Alexander, Carter cC- Theisen, William 

Walter. 

Publicity campaigns for better school 

support. 1921. (School efficiency 

monographs.) 379.1 A37 

Betts, George Herbert. 

The new program of religious educa- 
tion. cl921. (The Abingdon relig- 
ious education texts.) 377 B56 

Blackburn, Mary. 

Montessori experiments. 1920. 

372 B62 

Bureau of educational experiments, New 
York. 
Health education and the nutrition 
class. cl921. 371.7 B952 

Butler, Nicholas Murray. 

Scholarship and service. 1921. 

378.73 B98 
Cameron, Edward Herbert. 

Psychology and the school. 1921. (The 
Century education series.) 

370.1 C18 
Emerton, Ephraim. 

Learning and living, academic essays. 
1921. 370.4 E535 



Ensign, Forest Chester. 

Compulsory school attendance and 
child labor. [1921] 379.23 E59 

Garnett, James Clerk Maxwell. 

Education and world citizenship. 1921. 

370.1 G23 

Haarhoff, Theodore Johannes. 

Schools of Gaul. 1920. 370.9 H11 

Inglas, Alexander James. 

Intelligence quotient values. cl921. 

q371.2 1 52 

Jackson, Bennett Barron [cC- others] 
comp. 

Opportunities of today for boys and 

girls. 1921. 370.01 J12 

Jordan, Riverda Harding. 

Nationality and school progress. cl921. 
(School and home education mono- 
graphs.) 371.9 J 82 

Kelly, Melville Clyde. 

The community capitol. 1921. 

379.1 K29 
Klenke, William W. 

Art and education in wood-turning. 
cl921. 371.4 K64 

Macmillan, Cyrus. 

McGill and its story, 1821-1921. 1921. 
378.71 MEm 
Martin, Mrs Ida (Shaw). 

The sorority handbook. 7th ed. 1921. 
371.8 M38 
Maxwell. Charles Robert. 

The selection of textbooks. cl921. 
(Riverside educational monographs.) 
371.3 M46 
Parry, Reginald St. John, ed. 

Cambridge essays on adult education. 
1920. 374 P26 

Pyre, James Francis Augustine. 

Wisconsin. 1920. (American college 
and university series.) 

378.775 WEp 
Reed, Alfred Zantzinger. 

Training for the public profession of 
the law. 1921. (Carnegie founda- 
tion for the advancement of teach- 
ing.) q371.1 C2b 

Rice, Joseph Mayer. 

Scientific management in education. 
1914. 371 R49 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



205 



Shaw. Wilfred Byron. 

The University of Michigan, illustrated 
by photographs and four etchings. 
1920. 378.774 MEs 

Sleight. Walter Guy. 

The organization and curricula of 
schools. 1920. (Modern educator's 
library.) 371.2 S63 

Taylor, Stewart. 

Clay modelling for schools. 1921. 
(Pitman's handwork series.) 

372.53 T24 
Turner. Edwin Arthur. 

The essentials of good teaching, el 920. 

371.1 T94 

Virginia. Education commission. 

Virginia public schools, a survey of a 
southern state public school system. 
1920. 2 v. (Educational survey 
series.) 371.2 V81 

Who's who and why in after-war educa- 
tion. cl921. (Teacher recruiting- 
series.) r370.3 W62 



Wright, A. Vera G. 

The unrelated family. 1920. 



372 W94 



ASSOCIATIONS AND INSTITU- 
TIONS. 

Alexander. William. 

The prosperous agent ; characteristics 
of the successful life insurance solic- 
itor. 1921. 368.3 A37p 

Brandt, Lilian. 

How much shall I give? 1921. 

361 B82 
Briggs, Lloyd Vernon. 

The manner of man that kills, c-1921. 

364 B85 
Dewar, Katharine C. 

The girl, with a chapter on "Welfare 
work" by Gladys H. Dick. 1921. 
(The social service library.) 

367 D51 

Freemasons. Templars. Illinois. 

Proceedings of the grand eommandery 
of Knights templar of Illinois, v. 65. 
1921. 366.1 F85ti 

Goddard, Henry Herbert. 
Juvenile delinquency. 1921. 

364.1 G57 



Hendricks, Genevieve Poyneer. 

Handbook of social resources of the 
United States. 1921. ([Red cross. 
U. S. American national Red Cross] 
ARC [circular] 412.) r361 H49 

Judge Baker foundation, Boston. 

Harvey Humphrey Baker, upbuilder of 
the juvenile court. 1920. (Judge 
Baker foundation. Publication no. 
1.) 364.1 J 92 

Lanier. John Jabez. 

Masonry and citizenship, c-1921. 

366.1 L28 

Lovelace. Griffin M. 

The house of protection. cl921. (Har- 
per's life insurance library.) 

368.3 L89 

McCotter, Charles Augustus. 

What's the matter with fire insurance? 
cl921. 368.1 M13 

Milnes. Nora. 

Child welfare. 1920. 362.7 M65 

The New York charities directory. 1921. 

r361 N56 

Richards. Ellis Gray. 

The experience grading and rating 
schedule. 1921. 368.1 R51 

Waite, Arthur Edward. 

A new encyclopaedia of freemasonary. 
1921. 2 v. 366.1 W14 

CUSTOMS AND FOLKLORE. 

Baldwin, James. 

The story of Roland. 189(1. (Heroes 
of the olden time.) 398 B18r 

— The story of Siegfried. 1896. 

(Heroes of the olden time.) 

398 B18si 

Carpenter, Edward. 

Love's coming of age. 1911. 

392 C29 

Clodd, Edward. 

Magic in names and in other things. 

1920. 398.3 C643 

Fansler, Dean Spruill. ed. 

Filipino popular tales. Collected and 
edited, with comparative notes. 

1921. (Memoirs of the American 
folklore society, vol. 12.) 398 A51 



206 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Haktland, Edwin Sidney. 

Primitive society. 1921. 392 H33 

Houston, Mary G., & Hornblower, Flor- 
ence S. 
Ancient Egyptian, Assyrian, and Per- 
sian costumes and decorations. 1920. 
(A technical history of costume.) 

391 H84 
Magnus, Leonard Arthur. 

The heroic ballads of Russia. 1921. 

398 M19h 
Shelby, Annie Blanche, comp. 

The lullaby book ; or, Mothers' love 
songs. 1921. 398.8 S54 

Shover, Edna Mann. 

Art in costume design. 1920. 

q391 S55 

Strachey, Marjorie. 

Savitri and other women. 1920. 

398 S89 

TORREND, J. 

Specimens of Bantu folklore from 
northern Rhodesia. 1921. 398 T69 

LAW. 

Burke, William, defendant. 

Burke and Hare. [1921] (Notable 
English trials.) 

Federal trade information service. 
Federal taxes for 1921. cl921. 

Smith, Horace Edwin. 

A treatise on the law of personal 
property. cl908. 

Snow, Alpheus Henry. 

The question of aborigines in the law 
and practice of nations. 1921. 

LANGUAGE. 

Anderson, James Drummond. 

A manual of the Bengali language. 
1920. (Cambridge guides to modern 
languages.) 491.4 A54 

Craigie, William Alexander. 

A first English book for foreign pupils. 
1920. 428 C88 

Dubrule, Noelia. 

Le frangais pour tous. cl921. 

448 D18d 



Fiedler, Hermann Georg, & Sandbach, 
Francis Edward. 
A first German course for science 
students. 2d ed. rev. 1921. 

438 F45 

A second German course for 



science students. 2d ed. rev. 1921. 
438 F45a 
James, J. Courtenay. 

The language of Palestine and adja- 
cent regions. 1920. 492 J27 

Lusum, R. 

Spanish commercial correspondence. 

468 L97 
Mauritzson, Jules, comp. 

Graded reader for classes in Swedish. 
cl921. 439.7 M45 

Page, W. M. 

Pitman's commercial Esperanto. (Pit- 
man's commercial grammar series.) 
408.9 P13 
Palmer, Harold E. 

The principles of language-study. 1921. 

407 P17p 
Samson, D, N. 

English into French ; five thousand 
English locutions rendered into idio- 
matic French. 1920. 448 S19 

Sanin, Cano, Baldomero. 

Spanish reader. 1920. (The Oxford 
Spanish series.) 468 S22 

Sapir, Edward. 

Language, an introduction to the study 
of speech. 1921. 401 S24 

TOMKINSON, W. S. 

The teaching of English, a new ap- 
proach. 1921. 420.7 T65 

Van Ess, John. 

An aid to practical written Arabic. 
1920. 492.7 V25 

Walker, W. Seymour. 

The Siwi language. 1921. 493 W18 

Vizetelly, Francis Horace. 

Mend your speech. cl920. 428.3 V86 

Punctuation and capitalization, 

how to make use of them. c!921. 

421 V86p 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



207 



— Words we misspell in business. 

c-1921. (Standard desk -book series.) 

421 V86w 



NATURAL SCIENCE. 

Balfour-Browne, Frank. 

Keys to the order of insects. 1920. 

595.7 B185 
Brues, Charles Thomas. 

Insects and human welfare ; an ac- 
count of the more important rela- 
tions of insects to the health of 
man. to agriculture, and to forestry. 
1920. 595.7 B88S 

Buchanan, Robert Earle. 

Agricultural and industrial bacteri- 
ology. 1921. 589.9 B918 

Cabpenteb, Geoffrey Douglas Hale. 
A. naturalist on Lake Victoria. 1920. 
508.67 C29 
Chamot, Emile Monnin. 

Elementary chemical microscopy. 1921. 

578 C44 
Clements, Frederic Edward. 

Aeration and air-content. 1921. (Car- 
negie institution of Washington. 
Publications.) q581 C6a 

Dana, John Cotton. 

The gloom of the museum. 1917. 
(New museum series.) 507 D16 

Installation of a speaker and 

accompanying exhibits. 1918. (New 
museum series.) 507 D16i 



— The new museum. 1917. (New 
museum series.) 507 D16n 



A plan for a new museum. 1920. 

(New museum series.) 507 D16p 

Dymes, Thomas Alfred. 

The nature-study of plants in theory 
and practice for the hobby-botanist. 
1920. 581 D99 



Ealand, Charles Aubrey. 
Insect life. 1921. 



595.7 E11 



Fadree, Jean Henri Casimir. 

The story book of the fields. [1921] 

507 F12s 
Fernald, Henry Torsey. 

Applied entomology. 1921. (Agricul- 
tural and biological publications.) 

595.7 F36 



Henderson, I. F., d- Henderson, Wil- 
liam Dawson. 
A dictionary of scientific terms. 1920. 

503 H49 

Kingston, Richard William George. 
A naturalist in Himalaya. 1920. 

508.54 H66 
Twidle, Arthur. 

Beautiful butterflies of the tropics, 
how to collect them. 1920. 

q595.7 T9 

MATHEMATICS. 
Clark, John Jesse. 

The slide rule and logarithmic tables, 
including a ten-place table of loga- 
rithms. cl921. 510.8 C59 

Herbert, Thomas Ernest. 

The arithmetic of telegraphy and tele- 
phony. [1921] * 511 H 53 

Jackson, Charles Samuel. 

Examples in differential and integral 
calculus. 1921. (Longmans' mod- 
ern mathematical series.) 517 J 12 

Lange, David Christoph. 

Shades and shadows. 1921. 515 L27 

Rasor, Samuel Eugene. 

Mathematics for students of agricul- 
ture. 1921. (A series of mathemat- 
ical, texts.) 510 R22 

ASTRONOMY. 

Heath, Sir Thomas Little. 

The Copernicus of antiquity. 1920. 
(Pioneers of progress : men of sci- 
ence.) 520 H43 

Lewis, Mrs Isabel Eleanor (Martin). 
Splendors of the sky. 1921. 520 L67 



Pickering, William Henry. 
Mars. cl921. 



523.4 P59 



PHYSICS. 

Barus, Carl. 

Displacement interferometry applied to 
acoustics and to gravitation. 1921. 
(Carnegie institution of Washing- 
ton. Publications.) q535.4 B2d 



Campbell, Norman Robert. 
Physics ; the elements. 1920. 



q530 C1 



208 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1'922 



Chalmers, Thomas Wightman. 

The gyroscopic compass. 1920. (En- 
gineer series.) 538,7 C43 

Denny, Claude W. 

The electro-deposition of copper and 

its industrial applications. 1921. 

(Pitman's technical primer series.) 

537.85 D41 

Fray, Joseph. 

The' repairing optician; a beginner's 
guide to the optical workshop. 1920. 
(Oxford technical manuals.) 

535.8 F84 
Lamb, Horace. 

Higher mechanics. 1920. 531 L21 

[Laning, Harris], comp. 

A practical manual of the compass ; 
a short treatise on the errors of the 
magnetic compass. 1921. 

q 538.7 L2 
Mills, John. 

Within the atom. 1921. 530.1 M65 

Poynting, John Henry. 

Collected scientific papers. 1920. 

q530 P8 
Schlick, Moritz. 

Space and time in contemporary phy- 
sics. 1920. 530 S34 

Young, Arthur Primrose. 

The elements of electro-technics. 1920. 

537 Y68 

AERONAUTICS. 

P>ailey, George Cyril. 

The complete airman. [1920] 

533.6 B15 

Camm. F. J. 

Model aeroplanes ; the building of 
model monoplanes, biplanes, etc., to- 
gether with a chapter on building a 
model airship. (Cassell's work 
handbooks.) 533.6 C184 

Collins, Francis Arnold. 

The boys' book of model aeroplanes. 
1921. 533.6 C712b 

Fage, Arthur. 

Airscrews in theory and experiment. 
1920. q533.6 F1 



Park, Whyrill E. 

A treatise on airscrews. 1920. (The 
directly - useful (D. U.) technical 
series.) 533.6 P23 

Vivian, Evelyn Charles H. & Marsh, 
William Lockwood. 
A history of aeronautics. [1921] 

533.6 V85 

CHEMISTRY. 

Audley, James A. 

Silica and the silicates. 1921. (Indus- 
trial chemistry.) 549.6 A91 

Barnett, Edward de Barry. 

Anthracene and anthraquinone. 1921. 

547 B26a 



: A textbook of organic chemistry. 

1920. 547 B26t 

Barrowcliff, Marmaduke & Carr, Fran- 
cis Howard. 
Organic medicinal chemicals (syn- 
thetic and natural); 1921. (Indus- 
trial chemistry.) 547 B27 

Burton, Eli Franklin. 

The physical properties of colloidal 
solutions. 2d ed. 1921. (Mono- 
graphs on physics.) 541.1 B97 

Caven, Robert Martin. 

The foundations of chemical theory. 

1921. 541 C37 

^Frederick, Robert C. & Foster, Aquila. 
Public health chemical analysis. 1920. 

543.1 F85 
|Fry, Harry Shipley. 

The electronic conception of valence 
and the constitution of benzene. 
1921. Monographs on inorganic 
and physical chemistry.) 541 F94 

Hawkes, William H. 

Factory chemistry. 1921. 540 H39 

Moore, Benjamin. 

Biochemistry ; a study of the origin, 

reactions, and equilibria of living 

matter. 1921. 547.9 M82 

Organic syntheses ; an annual publication 
of satisfactory methods for the pre- 
paration of organic chemicals. 1921. 
547 068 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



209 



Snell. Foster Dee. 
Colorimetric analysis. 



1921. 



543.6 S6V 



GEOLOGY. 

Clarke, George Aubourne. 

Clouds ; a descriptive illustrated guide- 
book to the observation and classifi- 
cation of clouds. 1920. 551.57 C59 

Dickson, Archibald A. C. 

The mica miner's and prospector's 
guide. 1919. 553.9 D55 

Geddes, Alexander Ebenezer McLean. 
Meteorology ; an introductory treatise. 
1921. 551.5 G29 

Geikie, James. 

Structural and field geology. 4th ed., 
rev. 1920. 551.8 G31a 

Hobbs, William Herbert. 

Earth evolution and its facial expres- 
sion. 1921. 551 H68 

Holmes, Arthur. 

The nomenclature of petrology. [1920] 

552 H74 
Iddings, Joseph Paxson. 

Igneous rocks ; composition, texture 

and classification, description and 

occurrence. 2d ed., rev. 1920. 2 v. 

552.1 118 

Jenkins, James Travis. 

A textbook of oceanography. 1921. 

551.46 J52 
Leith, Charles Kenneth. 

The economic aspects of geology. cl921. 

553 L53 

.Reed, Frederick Richard Cowper. 

The geology of the British Empire. 
1921. 550 R32 

Warner, Charles Albert. 

Field mapping for the oil geologist. 
1921. 553.2 W27 

BIOLOGY. 

Cardinall, Allan Wolsey. 

The natives of the northern territories 
of the Gold Coast. 1920. 572 C26 



Holt, James Harvey. 
Finger prints simplified. 



cl920. 

573.6 H86 



Johnston, Sir Harry Hamilton. 

The backward peoples and our rela- 
tions with them. 1920. (The world 
of to-day.) 572 J 72 



Kidd, Walter Aubrey. 
Initiative in evolution. 



1920. 



575 K46 



Crawford, O. G. S. 
Man and his past. 



1921. 



571 C89 



Newman, Horatio Hackett, cd. 

Readings in evolution, genetics and 
eugenics. cl921. 575 N55 

Sharp, Lester Whyland. 

An introduction to. cytology. _ 1921. 

576 S53 

Smith, Edwin W. & Dale, Andrew Mur- 
ray. 
The Ila-speaking peoples of Northern 
Rhodesia. 1920. 572 S646 

Vanden Bergh, Leonard John. 

On the trail of the pigmies. cl921. 

572 V22 

ZOOLOGY. 

Batten, H. Mortimer. 

Habits and characters of various wild 
animals. q599 B3 

Beard, Daniel Carter. 

American boys' book of wild animals. 
1921. (Woodcraft series.) 

590.4 B368 
Treadwell, Aaron Louis. 

Leodicidae of the West Indian region. 
1921. (Department of marine biol- 
ogy of the Carnegie institution of 
Washington.) q591.92 C2 

Ward, Francis. 

Animal life under water. 1920. 

591.5 W25 

MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. 

Aikens, Charlotte Albina. 

Studies in ethics for nurses. 1922. 

610.73 A29s 
Bayliss, William Maddock. 

Principles of general physiology. 3d 
ed., rev. 1920. q612 B3 



210 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Cathcart, Edward Provan. 

The physiology of protein metabolism. 
1921. (Monographs on biochemis- 
try.) 612.3 C36 

Culpin, Millais. 

Psychoneuroses of war and peace. 
1920. 616.85 C96 

Daniels, Ralph Roy. 

Taking it on high ; body strength and 
brainpower. cl921. 613 D18 

Davis, Albert Edward. 

Hypnotism and treatment by sugges- 
tion. 1920. 612.82 D26 

Elliot,. Robert Henry. 

The care of eye cases ; a manual for 
the nurse, practitioner and student. 
[1921] (Oxford medical publica- 
tions.) 617.7 E46 

Evans, George. 

A practical treatise on artificial 
crown-, bridge-, and porcelain-work. 
8th ed., rev. and enl. cl920. 

617.6 E92 
Galloway, Thomas Walton. 

The sex factor in human life. 1921. 
(The American social hygiene asso- 
ciation, inc. Publication.) 

612.6 G17sa 

Gammons, Herbert Francis.. 
Practical tuberculosis. 1921. 

616.99 G19 
Hinkle, Thomas Clark. 

How to eat ; a cure for "nerves.'' 
cl921. 613.2 H66 



Hoch, August. 

Benign stupors. 1921. 



616.84 H68 



Humphrey, John Thurlbeck. 

Drugs in commerce, their source, pre- 
paration for the market, and descrip- 
tion. 1921. (Pitman's common 
commodities and industries.) 

615.1 H92 
Kligler, Israel Jacob. 

Investigation on soil pollution and the 
relation of the various types of priv- 
ies to the spread of intestinal infec- 
tions. 1921. (Monographs of the 
Rockefeller institute for medical re- 
search.) q614.7 K6 



Long, Constance Ellen. 

Collected papers on the psychology of 
phantasy. 1920. 616.8 L84 

McCann, Alfred Watterson. 
The science of eating. cl919. 

613.2 M12s 

Meyer, Ernst Christopher. 

Infant mortality in New York city. 
1921. (The Rockefeller foundation. 
International health board. Publica- 
tion.) 614.132 M61 

Pare, Ambroise. 

Life and times of Ambroise Pare 

(1510-1590) with a new translation 

of his Apology and an account of 

his journeys in divers places. 1921. 

617 P22 

Rucker, Augusta. 

Ten talks to girls on health. 1921. 

613 R91 
Rtjffer, Sir Marc Armand. 

Studies in the paleopathology of 
Egypt. cl921. q610 R9 

Tridon, Andre. 

Easy lessons in psychoanalysis. cl921. 
616.8 T82e 
Vecchi, Paolo de. 

Modem Italian surgery and old univer- 
sities of Italy. 1921. 617 V39 

White, William Alanson. 

Foundations of pyschiatry. 1921. 
(Nervous and mental disease mono- 
graph series.) q616.84 W5 

Woodhead, Sir German Sims & Varrier- 
Jones, Pendrill Charles. 
Industrial colonies and village settle- 
ments for the consumptive. 1920. 

616.99 W88 

ENGINEERING. 

Aiirons, Ernest Leopold. 

Steam locomotive construction and 
maintenance. 1921. (Pitman's tech- 
nical primer series.) 621.1 A28s 

The steam railway locomotive. 



cl920. (Pitman's technical primer 
series.) 621.1 A28 

Allen, Alfred Frederick. 

An introduction to chemical engineer- 
ing. 1920. 621.9 A42 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



211 



Boyd, James Ellsworth. 
Mechanics. 1921. 



620.1 B78m 



Cabman, Edwin Salisbury. 

Foundry moulding machines and pat- 
tern equipment. cl920. 621.7 C28 

Fergusson, Frank Fairchild. 

The fundamental principles of water 
power engineering. 1921. (Pitman's 
technical primer series.) 621.2 F35 

Fries, Amos Alfred & West, Clarence 
Jay. 
Chemical warfare. 1921. 

623.45 F91 
Gates, Philip. 

Tool and machine setting, for milling, 
drilling, 'tapping, boring, grinding 
and press work. 1921. (Pitman's 
technical primer series.) 

621.7 G25 
Griffiths, Edgar A. 

Engineering instruments and meters. 
[1920] 

q620.7 G8 
Jacobs, Frederic Burnham. 

Cam design and manufacture. 1921. 

621.8 J17 
Judge, Arthur William. 

Automobile and aircraft engines in 
theory and experiment, being a thor- 
oughly revised and enlarged edition 
of high-speed internal combustion 
engines. 1921. (Specialists' series.) 
621.4 J92a 
Pratt, James Alfred. 

Elementary machine shop practice. 
1921. 621.7 P91 

Siiaw, Ben & Edgar, James. 

Patternmaking. 1921. (Pitman's tech- 
nical primer series.) 621.7 S53 

Stanley, Frank Arthur. 

Railroad shop practice ; methods and 
tools. 1921. 621.7 S78 

Struben, Arthur Marinus Alexander. 
Tidal power : tides and their measure- 
ment. 1921. (Pitman's technical 
primer series.) 621.2 S92 

Walton, Thomas. 

Present-day shipbuilding. 1921. 

623.8 W24p 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

Behrend, Bernard Arthur. 

The induction motor and other alter- 
nating current motors, their theory 
and principles of design. 1921. 

621.31 B42 

Broughton, Harold Hodgkinson. 

The electrical handling of materials. 
1920. q621.87 B8 

Clayton, Albert Edmund. 

Power factor correction. 1921. (Pit- 
man's technical primer series.) 

621.31 C62 
Denton, Francis Medford. 

Elementary principles of continuous- 
current armature winding. 1921. 
(Pitman's technical primer series.) 
621.31 D41 

E M F electrical year book ; 1921. 

q621.3 E11 
McFarlane, William. 

Electricity in steel works. 1921. (Pit- 
man's technical primer series.) 

621.31 M14 
Mears, John Willoughby. 

Hydroelectric development. 1920. (Pit- 
man's technical primer series.) 

621.34 M48 

Percival, G. Arncliffe. 

The electric lamp industry. [1920] 
(Common commodities and indu.s- 
tries.) 621.32 P42 

Poole, Henry Edward. 

High tension switchboards. 1921. (Pit- 
man's technical primer series.) 

621.34 P822 

Snell, Sir John Francis Cleverton. 
Power house design. 1921. (Long- 
mans' electrical engineering series.) 
621.31 S67 

Trewman, Harry Frederick. 

Electrification of railways. 1920. 

(Pitman's technical primer series.) 

621.33 T81 

Walker, Miles. 

The diagnosing of troubles in electrical 
machines. 1921. (Longmans' elec- 
trical engineering series.) 

q621.31 W1 



212 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Watkins, George Pendleton. 

Electrical rates. cl921. 621.32 W33 

Wilcox, Delos Franklin. 

Analysis of the electric railway prob- 
lem. 1921. q62l.33 VV6 

AUTOMOBILES. 

American automobile digest. 
Motor truck manual. 1921. 

625.6 A51au 
Terry, Christopher William. 

Practical motor body building. 1921. 
625.6 T32p 
Weight, John Calvin. 

Automotive repair. 1921. v. 1. 

625.6 W95 

AGRICULTURE. 

Buell, Jennie. 

The Grange master and the Grange 
lecturer. 1921. (The farmer's book- 
shelf.) 630.6 B92 

Chittenden, Frederick James. 

The garden doctor. 1920. (Country 
life library.) 632 C54 

Dadisman, Samuel Houston. 

Methods of teaching vocational agri- 
culture in secondary schools. cl921. 
630.7 D12 
Davis, Vernon Hayes. 

The garden book, a popular treatise 
on the growing of vegetables under 
both home and market conditions. 

1920. 635 D264 

Skilling, William Thompson. 

Nature-study agriculture ; a textbook 
for beginners. 1920. (New-world 
agriculture series.) 630 S62 

Smytiie, William Ellsworth. 

City homes on country lanes. 1921. 

630 S668 

FORESTRY. 

Chapman, Herman Haupt. 

Forest mensuration. 1921. 

634.9 C46f 
Jackson, Henry. 

A short manual of forest management. 

1921. 634.9 J12 



Stone, Herbert. 

A guide to the identification of our 
more useful timbers. 1920. 

634.9 S87 
Woodward, Karl Wilson. 

The valuation of American timber- 
lands. 1921. 634.9 W911 

DOMESTIC ANIMALS. 

American Jersey cattle club. 

Register of merit of Jersey cattle. 

1920. 636.2 A51 

Baker, William Edgar. 

The Airedale terrier standard simpli- 
fied. 1921. (Popular dogs of the 
day.) 636.7 B16 

Beuette, William Arthur. 

The complete dog book. 1921. 

636.7 B88c 
Collier, V. W. F. 

Dogs of China and Japan, in nature 
and art. 1921. q636.7 C6 

Crandall, Lee Saunders. 

Pets and how to care for them. 1921. 

636 C89p 
Douglass, Benjamin Wallace. 

Every step in beekeeping. cl921. 

638 D73 
Hawkins, Kennith. 

Beekeeping in the South. cl920. 

638 H39 
Macself, A. J. 

Flying Homer pigeons. 1920. 

636.6 M17 
Quisenbebry, Thomas E., cd. 

How to tell the sex of an egg before 
incubation, and how to tell the sex 
of a chick when hatched. cl921. 

636.5 Q6 
Robinson, John Henry. 

Fundamentals in poultry breeding. 
cl921. q636.5 R6f 

Standard poultry for exhibition 

1921. q636.5 R6s 

Williamson, John Wesley. 

A to Z of pigeons, fancy and utility, 
with latest standards. 1921. 

636.6 W73 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



213 



DAIRY AND DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Hunziker, Otto Fred. 

Condensed milk and milk powder. 3d 
ed., rev. and enl. 19'20. 637 H95a 

Jensen, Orla. 

Dairy bacteriology. 1921. 637 J54 

Richmond, Henry Droop. 

Dairy chemistry. 1920. 637 R53a 

ACCOUNTING. 
Bell, William Hansell. 

Accountants' reports. 1921. q657 B4 

McGrath, Thomas Orrin. 

Mine accounting and cost principles. 
1921. 657 M147 

Musick, William L. 

Practical bookkeeping and accounting. 
cl921. 657 M98 

Todman, Frederick Simson. 
Wall street accounting. 1921. 

657 T63 
Walton, Seymour. 

Mathematics of accounting and finance. 

1921. 657 W24 

ADVERTISING. 

Aughinbaugh, William Edmund. 

Advertising for trade in Latin-America. 

1922. (The Century foreign trade 
series.) 659 A91 

Bkenlser, Ross Dalbey. 

The schemes back of the ads. cl920. 

659 B83 

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. 

Andros, Stephen Osgood. 
Fuel oil in industry. 1920. 

662.6 A57 

Chemical engineering catalog ; 6" an- 
nual ed., 1921. q660 C5 

De Wolf, Philip, & Larison, E. L. 
American sulphuric acid practice. 
1921. 661.2 D52 

Gee, George Edward. 

Recovering precious metals from waste 
liquid residues. 1920. 669.2 G29 



Hager, Dorsey. 

Oil-field practice. 1921. 



665.5 H14 



Hall, William Thomas & Williams, Rob- 
ert Seaton. 
The chemical and metallographic ex- 
amination of iron, steel and brass. 
1921. 669.1 H18 

Marshall, Arthur. 

Dictionary of explosives. 1920. 

662 M366 

Morrell, Robert Selby & Waele, Ar- 
mand de. 
Rubber, resins, paints and varnishes. 
(Industrial chemistry.) 660 M87 

Parry, Ernest John. 

The raw materials in perfumery. 1921. 
(Common commodities and indus- 
tries.) 668.5 P26r 

Rideal, Samuel. 

The carbohydrates and alcohol. 1920. 
(Industrial chemistry.) 664 R54 

Robertson, John Braithwaite. 

The chemistry of coal. 1919. (Chem- 
ical monographs.) 662.6 R65 

Tinkler, Charles Kenneth, cC- Masters, 
Helen. 
Applied chemistry ; a practical hand- 
book for students of household sci- 
ence and public health. 1920. 

660 T58 
Whymber, Robert. 

Cocoa and chocolate ; their chemistry 
and manufacture. 1921. 

663.9 W62 

MANUFACTURES. 
Boulton, B. C. 

The manufacture and use of plywood 
and glue. 1920. 674 B76 

Cravens, George W. 

Welding ; a practical treatise on the 
applications of electric, ga.s, and 
thermit welding to manufacturing 
and repair work. 1920. 671 C89 

Cross, Charles Frederick, & Bevan, Ed- 
ward John. 
A textbook of paper-making. 1920. 

676 C95a 
Ellis, B. Eldred. 

Gloves and the glove trade. 1921. 
(Common commodities and indus- 
tries.) 675 E47 



214 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Hall, Harvey Monroe, & Long, Frances 
Louise. 
Rubber - content of North American 
plants. 1921. (Carnegie institu- 
tion of Washington. Publications.) 
q678 H1 
Harvey, Arthur. 

Practical leather chemistry. 1920. 

675 H34 

The house of Kuppenheimer, Chicago. 
Tempered clothing. 1921. 677 H84 

Joint executive committee of the voca- 
tional education committees of the 
pulp and paper industry of the 
United States and Canada. 
The manufacture of pulp and paper. 
1921. 2 v. 676 J 74 

Mumford, John Kimberly. 

Outspinning the spider ; the story of 
wire and wire rope. cl921. 

671 M96 
Pearson, Henry Clemens. 

Rubber machinery. 1920. 678 P36ru 



Priestman, Howard. 

Principles of wool combing 
(Technological handbooks.) 



1921. 



677 P94 



— ■ Principles of worsted spinning. 

1921. 677 P94w 

Whitwam, Joseph Henry. 

Textile calculations, manufacture and 
mechanism. 1920. (Pitman's tex- 
tile industries series.) 677 W62 

FINE ARTS. 

Biermann, Georg. 

Florence and her art. 1912. (The 
Langham series ; an illustrated col- 
lection of art monographs'.) 

709.45 B58 
Faure, Elie. 

History of art. 1921. v. 1. 709 F26 

Finberg, Alexander Joseph. 

The first exhibition of the new society 
of graphic art. 1921. 706 F49 

Mayer, Edward von. 

Pompeii as an art city. 1914. (The 
Langham series ; an illustrated col- 
lection of art monographs.) 

709.45 M46 



PAINTING. 

Asplund, Karl. 

Anders Zorn, his life and work. 1921. 
q759.9 Z89a 
Bin yon Laurence. 

The court painters of the Grand Mo- 
guls. 1921. q759.9 B6c 

Bye, Arthur Edwin. 

Pots and pans ; or, Studies in still-life 
painting. 1921. 754 B99 

Fletcher, John Gould. 

Paul Gauguin, his life and art. 1921. 
759.9 G26f 
Gleason, Martin F. 

First steps in water color painting. 
cl921. q751 G5 

Holman, Louis Arthur. 

Rembrandt and his etchings. 1921. 
(Goodspeed's monographs.) 

759.9 R38h 
Jennings, Frances. 

A tour in a donkey-cart . . . with 
reproductions of drawings. 1921. 

q759.2 J 5 
Klickmann, Flora, ed. 

Fruit and flower studies ; a book for 
amateur artists. [1920] q751 K6 



Maguinness, Irene. 

British painting. 1920. 



759.2 M21 



Marriott, Charles. 

Modern movements in painting. 1920. 

759 M35 
Mutiier, Richard. 

Rembrandt. 1910. (The Langhan' 
series ; an illustrated collection of 
art monorgaphs. ) 759.9 R38mu 

Pennell, Mrs Elizabeth (Robins) & 
Pennell, Joseph. 
The Whistler journal. 1921. 

759.1 W57p 
Schaeffer, Emil. 

Sandro Botticelli. 1910. (The Lang- 
ham series ; an illustrated collection 
of art monographs.) 759.5 B75sc 

Smith, Solomon Charles Kaines. 
Looking at pictures. 1921. 750 S66 

Turner, Percy Moore. 

The appreciation of painting. 1921. 

759 T951 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



215 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

Oliver. George Watson c& Hottes, Alfred 



Carl. 
Plant culture. 1021. 



716 048 



Repton, Humphrey. 

Observations on the theory and prac- 
tice of landscape gardening. 1803. 
q710 R4 
Thomas, Harry Higgott. 

Practical amateur gardening. 1920. 

716 T45p 
Wells, William. 

Wells' book on the culture of the 
chrysanthemum for exhibition, dec- 
oration, cut flower, and market . . . 
4th ed., rev. and enl. 1920. 

716 W45 

ARCHITECTURE. 

Atlas Portland cement company, Neiv 
York. 
The stucco house, a book for those 
about to build. cl921. q728 A8s 

Axelrod, Jay. 

Artistic and practical homes for the 
average man. cl921. 728 A96 

Blomfield, Sir Reginald Theodore. 

A history of French architecture from 

the death of Mazarin till the death 

of Louis XV, 16G1-1774. 1921. 2 v. 

q720.944 B6a 

Boyd. Charles Vaughn, comp. 

The little book of bungalows and cot- 
tages. cl921. 728 B78 

Bumpus, Thomas Francis. 

The cathedrals of England and Wales. 
[1921] 726 B94ce 

Coffin, Lewis A. & others. 

Small French buildings. 1921. 

q720.944 C6 
Flagg, Ernest. 

Small houses, their economic design and 
construction. 1922. f728 F5 

Hopkins, Alfred. 

The English village church. cl921. 

q726 H79 



Ladies' home journal. 

Journal bungalows. 1921. 728 L15b 

Remey, Charles Mason. 

Illustrated description of a design in 
the Persian-Indian style of archi- 
tecture for the first Mashrak-el- 
Azkar (Bahai temple) to be erected 
in America. cl920. q726 R3i 

Stillwell, Elmer W. & co. 

West coast bungalows. c728 S85w 

DRAWING, DECORATION, DESIGN. 

Arthur, Anne Knox. 

An embroidery book. 1920. 746 A78 

Baker, Walter Davis, cG Baker, Ida 
Strawn. 
Batik and other pattern dyeing. 1920. 

745 B16 
Bement, Alon. 

Figure construction. cl921. 

q743 B45 
Brown. J. Hullah. 

Sketching without a master. 1920. 

741 B87 

French. Thomas Ewing, cC- Turnbull, 
William Davis. 
Lessons in lettering. cl921. 745 F87I 

Holme, Geoffrey, ed. 

A book of old embroidery. 1921. 

q746 H7 

Jackson, Emily, "Mrs F. Nevill Jack- 
son." 
Ancestors in silhouette, cut by August 
Edouart. 1921. q741 E2 

Litchfield, Frederick. 

Antiques, genuine and spurious. 1921. 

749 L77a 
May, C. J. Delabere. 

How to identify Persian rugs. 1920. 

745 M466 
Stanley, Frank Arthur. 

Drawing room practice. 1921. 

744 S78 

Wheeler, Mrs Candace (Thurber). 
The development of embroidery in 
America. 1921. 746 W56 



216 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

Buttebick publishing company, limited. 
The new dressmaker. cl921. 

q646 B9 

[Clyatt, Harry B.]. 

Campfire cookery for soldiers, scouts, 

campers, hikers, hotels, restauran- 

ters, boarding houses, auto tourist. 

[cl921] 641 C64 

Eldeed, Mrs Myrtle M. & Le Cron, Mrs 
Helen Cowles. 
For the young mother. cl921. 

649 E37 
Geobge, Florence A. 

A manual of cookery. 1921. 

641 G34m 

Hungeefobd, Ethelbert Arthur. 

How to get on two pay-rolls ; a man- 
ual of personal and family finances. 
cl921. 647 H93 

Izor, Estelle Peel. 

Costume design and home planning. 
cl916. 646 1 99 

Murphy, Claudia Quigley. 

The history and art of tablesetting. 
1921. 643 M97 

Scott, Walter Dill, & Hayes, Mary 
Holmes Stevens. 
Science and common sense in working 
with men. 1921. 658 S43s 

Snedden, David Samuel, ed. 

Vocational home - making education. 
1921. q640.7 S6 

Weight, Richardson Little. 

House and garden's book of interiors. 
1920. q645 W9 

FURNITURE. 

Bode, Wilhelm. 

Italian renaissance furniture. cl921. 

q749 B6 
Nutting, Wallace. 

Furniture of the Pilgrim century. 
cl921. q749 N98 

Small, John William. 

Scottish woodwork of the sixteenth 
and seventeenth centuries measured 
and drawn for the stone. 2d ed. 
189S. f749 S6 



PHOTOGRAPHY. 

Hibbert, L. J. 

A manual of photographic technique. 
1921. (Pitman's technical primer 
series.) 770 H62 

Maetin, Marcus J. 

The electrical transmission of photo- 
graphs. 1921. 778 M38e 

Photo pictorialists of Buffalo. 

Pictorial landscape photography. 1921. 

q770 P5 

MOVING PICTURES. 
Cameeon, James R. 

Motion picture projection. 2d ed. 
1921. 778 C18 

Emeeson, John & Loos, Anita. 
Breaking into the movies. cl921. 

778 E53b 

Lescabbouba, Austin Celestin. 
The cinema handbook. 1921. 

778 L62c 

The motion picture weekly, a publica- 
tion for, of and by motion picture 
people, v. 1. 1919. qc778.05 M9 

MUSIC. 

Antcliffe, Herbert. 

How to enjoy music. 1921. (Library 
of music and musicians.) 780 A62h 

Short studies in the nature of 



music. 1920. (Library of music 
and musicians.) 780.4 A62 

Auer, Leopold. 

Violin playing as I teach it. 61921. 

787.1 A91 

Bebnaedi, Gian Giuseppe. 

Counterpoint. 1921. (The musician's 
bookshelf.) 781 B52 

Beidge, Sir Frederick. 

Twelve good musicians, from John 
Bull to Henry Purcell. [1920] 

780.19 B85 

Bboadwood, Lucy. 

Songs from Alice in Wonderland, and 

Through the looking-glass. [1921] 

q784 B8 

Words and music. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



217 



Bruguiere, Emile Autoine. 

Querida ; lyric drama in two acts. 

qc782 B8 

Fidler, Florence G. 

A handbook of orchestration, with 
musical illustrations in the text and 
4 compass charts. 1921. (Library 
of music and musicians.) 785 F45 

Henderson, William James. 

Early history of singing. 19*21. 

784.9 H49e 

Locke, Arthur Ware. 

Music and the romantic movement in 
France. 1920. (Library of music 
and musicians.) 780.9 L81 

Lowe, George. 

Josef Holbrooke and his work. 1920. 
780.2 H72I 
Luce, Allena, comp. 

Canciones populares. cl921. 

q784.4 L9 
Pike, Harry Hale. 

An afternoon tea. cl921. 782.8 P63 
An operetta for children. 

Planquette, Robert Jean. 

The bells of Corneville. Comic opera 
in three acts. clOOT. q782.6 P7 

Pollitt, Arthur W. 

The enjoyment of music. 1921. 

780 P77 
Quarry, W. Edmund. 

Dictionary of musical compositions and 
composers. 1920. r780.3 Q1 

Rivarde, Achille. 

The violin and its technique as a 
means to interpretation of music. 
1921. (The musician's library.) 

787.1 R618 
Scholes, Percy Alfred. 
The book of the great musicians. 1921. 
780.4 S36b 

Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour & Gil- 
bert, William Schwenck. 
Songs of two Savoyards. q784.8 S94 

Thayer. Alexander Wheelock. 

The life of Ludwig van Beethoven. 
[1921] 3 v. q 780.2 B4t 

Gift of Beethoven association. 



Wardwell, Linda Bell (Free) "Mrs F. S. 
Wardwell." 
American music. 1920. (Plan of 
study on musical history.) 

780.7 W26 
Wier, Albert E., ed. 

Light violin pieces the whole world 
plays. cl922. (Whole world series.) 
q787.1 W6l 
Wronski, Thaddeus. 

The singer and his art. 1921. 

784.9 W95 

AMATEUR THEATRICALS. 

Benton, Rita. 

The star-child and other plays. 61921. 

793.2 B47 
Booth, Hilliard. 

The red lamp. cl914. 793 B72 

Hope, Winifred Ayres. 

Friends in bookland. 1921. 

793.2 H79 
Reely, Mary Katharine. 

Early Ohios and Rhode Island reds ; 
a comedy in one act. cl921. 

793 R32e 
Russell, Mary M. 

Dramatized Bible stories "for young- 
people. cl921. 793.1 R96 

Spenser, Willard. 

Carrying out a theory. 1921. 

793 S74 

Spofford, Mrs Harriet Elizabeth (Pres- 
cott). 
The fairy changeling. 1911. 793.2 S76 

Sutherland, Evelyn Greenleaf. 

In office hours, and other sketches for 
vaudeville or private acting. 1900. 
793 S96 
Wright, Harriet Sabra. 

New plays from old tales. 1921. 

793.2 W94 

PAGEANTS. 

Baker, George Pierce. 

The Pilgrim spirit. 1921. 792.7 B16 

Nevada historical society. 

The pageant of Nevada history. [1914] 
c792.7 N49 



218 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Taft, Linwood. 

The technique of pageantry. 1921. 

792.7 T12 
RECREATION. 
Bruck, Teresa M. 

Children's games for all seasons. 
cl921. 790 B88 

Burt, Emily Rose. 

Entertaining made easy. cl919. 
(Made easy series.) 793 B97 

Claudy, Carl Harry. 

The battle of base-ball. 1912. 

797 C615 

Duncan, George c£- Darwin, Bernard. 
Present-day golf. [1921] 796 D91 

Gates, Estella Anna Marie ( Jorgeusen). 
Successful socials. cl9>21. 793 G25 

Geister. Edna. 

The ice-breaker herself ; practical sug- 
gestions for recreation leadership. 
1921. 793 G31i 

Graves, Ernest. 

The line man's bible ; a foot-ball text 
book. 1921. 797 G77 

Hare, Walter Ben. 

The minstrel encyclopedia. 1921. 

793 H27mi 

HDoubler, Margaret Newell. 
A manual of dancing. 1921. 

793.1 H43 

Heckstall-Smith, B. & Du Boulay, E. 

The complete yachtsman. 3d ed., rev. 

1921. 797 H44 

Heisman, John William. 

Principles of foot ball. cl921. 

797 H47 

Hewitt, Richard George, cC Ellis, Lewis. 
School camps : their value and organi- 
zation. 1920. 796 H61 

Lunn, Arnold Henry Moore. 
• Cross-country ski-ing. 1920. (Methu- 
en's sports series.) 796 L96 

Lustig, David J. 

La Yellma's vaudeville budget for 
magicians, mind readers and ventril- 
oquists. cl921. 791 L97 



Macgowan, Kenneth. 

The theatre of tomorrow. cl921. 

792 M14 
McIsaac, F. J. 

The Tony Sarg marionette book. 1921. 

792 M152 
McGraw, John J. 

How to play baseball. [1914] 

797 M14 

Madison's budget ; a year - book of 
comedy material for vaudeville en- 
tertainers, containing original mono- 
logues, sketches, minstrel first-parts, 
. . . and other kinds of stage fun. 
1921. q793 M1 

Prince, Arthur. 

The whole art of ventriloquism. 1920. 

791 P95 
Stratton, Clarence. 

Producing in little theaters. 1921. 

792 S91 
Strouse. Arthur Howard. 

Outdoor stunts for young and old. 
cl920. 796 S92 

Tilden, William Tatem. 

. The art of lawn tennis. cl921. 

796 T57 

Walker, A. H. & Walker, Horace E. L. 
Conjuring tricks. 1920. 

791 W17 

Wiiitworth, Ruth Hoadley, comp. 
Indoor games and amusements. cl915. 

793 W62 

LITERATURE. 

Aciieson, Arthur. 

Shakespeare's lost years in London, 
1586-1592. 1920. 822.33 Ba 

Arensberg, Walter. 

The cryptography of Dante. 1921. 

851.15 Ea 
The Atlantic monthly. 

Youth and the new world ; essays from 
the Atlantic monthly. cl921. 

814 A88y 
Benciiley, Robert Charles. 

Of all things. 1921. 817 B45 

Bennett, Arnold. 

Things that have interested me. [1921] 
824 B471t 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



219 



Birkiiead, Edith. 

The. tale of terror : a study of the 
Gothic romance. 1921. 820.9 B61 



Bridges, Robert Seymour. 
Milton's prosody. 1921. 



821.47 Db 



Rroadus, Edmund Kemper, camp. 

Books and ideals. 1921. 808.8 B86 

Oaeden, Percy Theodore. 

The murder of Edwin Drood recounted 
by John Jasper, being an attempted 
solution of the mystery based on 
Dickens' manuscript and memoranda 
ol920. 823 D54zcar 

Dante Alighieri. 

Dantis Alagerii Epistolae : the letters 
of Dante. 1920. 851.15 Z1t 



Day, Clarence Sbepard. 
The crow's nest. 1921. 



817 D27 



Dunsasy, Edward John Moreton Drax 
Plunkett, 18th baron. 
Nowadays. 1920. (The seven arts 
series.) 824 D92 



Eastman, Max. 

The sense of humor. 



1921. 827 E13 



Edmunds, Edward William. 

An historical summary of English lit- 
erature. 1920. 820.9 E24 

Elton, Oliver. 

A survey of English literature, 1830- 
1880. 1920. 2 v. 820.9 E51s 

Esenwein, Joseph Berg. 

The art of story-writing. el919. (The 
writer's library.) 808.3 E75a 

Gardner, Edmund Garratt. 

The national idea in Italian literature. 
1921. (Manchester university lec- 
tures.) 850.4 G22 

Geijerstam, Gustaf af. 

The book about little brother ; a story 
of married life. 1921. ( Scandina- 
vian classics.) 839.73 G31b 

Guedalla, Philip. 

Supers and supermen : studies in 
politics, history and letters. [1921] 
824 G92 
Hall, Joseph, ed. 

Selections from early Middle English, 
1130-1250. 1920. 820.8 H17 



Handscare, Alan. 

Authorodoxy, being a discursive exam- 
ination of Mr G. K. Chesterton's 
"Orthodoxy." 1921. 824 C52zh 

Hazeltine, Alice Isabel. 

Plays for children ; an annotated in- 
dex ; 2nd. ed., rev. 1921. 

r808.21 H42 
Heidenstam, Verner von. 

The Charles men. 1920. 2 v. ( Scan- 
dinavian classics.) 839.73 H46c 



Henley, William Ernest. 
Essays. 1921. 



824 H51e 



House, Julius Temple. 

John G. Neihardt, man and poet. 1920. 
811 N39zh 

Hueffer. Ford Madox. 

Thus to revisit. 1921. 820.4 H88 

Huneker, James Gibbons. 

Variations. 1921. 814 H93v 

James, Henry. 

Notes and reviews. 1921. 824 J27n 

Jastrow, Morris, & Clay, Albert Tobias. 

An old Babylonian version of the Gil- 

gamesh epic. 1920. (Yale oriental 

series. Researches.) 892.1 J39 



Jokes for all occasions, c-1921. 



817 J74 



Keay, Frank Ernest. 

A history of Hindi literature. [1920] 
(The heritage of India series.) 

891.43 K25 
Krylov. Ivan Andreevich. 

Kriloff's fables. 1920. 981.78 K94c 

Laimaitre, Jules. 

Literary impressions. 1921. 

840.9 L54 
Leach, Henry Goddard. 

Angevin Britain and Scandinavia. 
1921. (Harvard studies in compara- 
tive literature.) 840.4 L43 

Lie, Jonas Lauritz Idemil. 

The family at Gilje. 1920. (Scandi- 
navian classics.) 839.83 L7165f 

Loshe, Lillie Deming. 

The early American novel. 1907. 
(Columbia university studies in 
English.) 813.01 L87 



220 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Mordell, Albert. 

The literature of ecstacy. cl9<21. 

808.1 M83 

Morley, Christopher Darlington. 

Modern essays. 1921. 824 M864 

Plum pudding. 1921. 



814 M86pl 

Neil, C. Edmund. 

Sources of effectiveness in public speak- 
ing. 1920. 808.5 N39 

Nelson, Mrs Alice Ruth (Moore) Dun- 
bar, ed. 
The Dunbar speaker and entertainer. 
cl920. 808.8 N42 

Nicholson, Reynold Alleyne. 

Studies in Islamic poetry. 1921. 

891.5 N62 

Parker, Mary Moncure. 

Jolly monologues. cl921. 812 P24j 

Patmore, Coventry Kersey Dighton. 
Courage in politics, and other essays. 
1921. 824 P31 

Phelps, Edith M., comp. 

Debaters' manual. 3d and rev. ed. 1919. 
(Debaters' handbook series.) 

808.5 P53a 

Phillpotts, Bertha Surtees. 

The Elder Edda and ancient Scandina- 
vian drama. 1920. 839.6 P56 

Topovie, Pavle, ed. and tr. 

Jugo-Slav stories. 1921. (The inter- 
preter's series.) 891.823 P82 

Raymond, Clifford Samuel. 

Clifford and John's almanack. cl921. 

818 R26 

Scott, John Adams. 
The unity of Homer. 1921. (Sather 
classical lectures.) 883 H76zs 

Shakhnovskii, I. K. 

A short history of Russian literature^ 
1921. 891.7 S52 



Smith, Logan Pearsall. 
More trivia. 1921. 



824 S654m 



Somerville, Edith Anna CEnone, £ 
Martin, Violet Florence. 
Stray-aways. 1920. 824 S69 



Spencer, Herbert. 

Essays, scientific, political and specu- 
lative. 1901. 824 S74es 

Stewart, Donald Ogden. 

A parody outline of history. 1921. 

817 S84 
Thompson, Vance. 

Strindberg, and his plays. 1921. 
(Studies in personality.) 

839.72 S91zt 

Toynp.ee, Paget Jackson. 

Britain's tribute to Dante in literature 
and art ; a chronological record of 
540 years (cl3SO-1920.) [1921] 

q851.15 At 

Turquet-Milnes, G. 

Some modern French writers. 1921. 

840.4 T95 

Ward, Sir Adolpheus William. 

Collected papers. 1921. vols. 1, 2, 
Historical. 824 W25 

Whitman, Walt. 

The uncollected poetry and prose of 
Walt Whitman. 1921. 2 v. 

818 W614u 

Winstanley, Lilian. 

Hamlet and the Scottish succession. 
1921. 822.33 P6wi 

Wister, Owen. 

Indispensable information for infants ; 

or. Easy entrance to education. 

1921. 817 W817 

Woodberry, George Edward. 

Literary memoirs of the nineteenth 
century. 1921. 824 W88I 

Studies of a litterateur. 1921. 

824 W88s 

POETRY. 

Aldington, Richard. 

Images of war. 1921. 821 A36iw 

Allen, Hervey. 

Wampum and old gold. 1921. (Yale 
series of younger poets.) 811 A426 



Brewer, William A., jr. 
Mavericks. 1921. 



c811 B847 



Browning, Eunice Beatrix. 

Poems. 1921. c811 B8854 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



221 



Cakducci, Giosue. 

A selection from poems ; tr. and anno- 
tated with a biographical introduc- 
tion by Emily A. Tribe. 1921. 

851 C26s 
Carleton, Will. 

City ballads. 2d ed. 1890. 811 C281 

Chanson de Roland. 

The song of Roland. 1920. 841 C45s 

Chittenden, William Lawrence. 

Ranch verses. 1921. 811 C54 

Dante Alighieri. 

The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : 

the Italian text with a translation in 

English blank verse. 1918-21. 3 v. 

851.15 P2la 

Davies, William Henry. 

The captive lion, and other poems. 
1921. 821 D257c 

[Dermody, Daniel Elmer]. 
The goose girls of the San Joaquin. 
cl921. c811 D43 

Gift of author. 

Deutsch, Babette & Yarmolinsky, Abra- 
ham, ed and tr. 
Modern Russian poetry. 1921. (The 
European library.) 891.71 D48 

Dickson, Edward Robert, ed. 

Poems of the dance, an anthology. 
(1500 B. C.-1920 A. D.) 1921. 

808.1 D55 
Diehl, Arthur V. 

"Tommy" rhymes. 1921. 811 D559 

Edwards, Matilda Barbara Betham, tr. 

French fireside poetry. 1921. 

841.08 E26 
Farrar, John Chipman. 

Songs for parents. 1921. 811 F24 

Goldring, Douglas. 

Streets and other verses. 1921. 

821 G621 
Hall, Hazel. 

Curtains. 1921. 811 H176 



Johnson, Burges. 
Youngsters. cl921. 



811.08 J 66 



Kilmer, Mrs Aline (Murray). 

Vigils. cl921. 811 K481v 



Kipling, Rudyard. 

From day to day with Kipling ; comp. 
by Wallace and Frances Rice. cl911. 
821 K57f 
Marks, Jeannette Augustus. 

Willow pollen. 1921. 811 M34 

Marquis, Don. 

Noah an' Jonah an' Cap'n John Smith. 
1921. 811 M35 

Masefield, John. 

King Cole, with drawings in black and 
white by Judith Masefield. 1921. 

821 M39k 
Masters, Edgar Lee. 

The open sea. 1921. 811 M42o 

Millay, Edna St. Vincent. 

Renascence, and other poems. 1921. 

811 M6452 

Second April. 1921. 811 M6452s 



Omar Khayyam. 

The rose garden of Omar Khayyam. 
1910. 891.5 Q54t 



Opdycke, John Baker. 
The Omar sonnets. 1909. 

Oxford poetry, 1921. 1921. 

Preston, Keith. 
Splinters. 1921. 



811 061 

821.08 098a4 
811 P938 



Rollins, Hyder Edward, ed. 

Old English ballads, 1553-1625. 1920. 
821.08 R75 
Selver, P. comp. and trans. 

Modern Czech poetry, selected texts 
with translations and an introduc- 
tion. 1920. 891.86 S46 



Sentner, David. 
Cobblestones. 1921. 



811 S47 



Smith, J. C, comp. 

A book of verse from Langland to Kip- 
ling, being a supplement to the 
"Golden treasury." 1921. 

821.08 S65 
Spencer, Fanny (Bixby). 

The voice of the counter-current. 

Gift of author. c 811 S74 



- Within and without. [191G] 
Gift of author. c811 S74w 



222 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Stevenson, Robert Louis. 

Moral emblems and other poems. 1921. 

821 S84m 
Taylor, Bert Leston. 

A penny whistle ; together with Bab- 
ette ballads. 1921. . 811 T2383p 

Untermeyer, Mrs Jean (Starr). 
Dreams out of darkness. 1921. 

811 U613 
Watson. Sir William. 

Ireland unfreed ; poems and verses 
written in the early months of 1921. 
1921. 821 W34i 

Whitaker, Robert. 

Cod garners no green grain. 1902. 

c811 W57g 

DRAMA. 

Andreev, Leonid Nikolaevieh. 
The dear departing. 191G. 

891.72 A55d 
Andrews, Matthew Page. 

The birth of America ; an historical 
drama in three acts. 1920. 

812 A56 
Archer, William. 

The green goddess. 1921. 822 A67g 

Brighouse, Harold. 

Plays for the meadow and plays for 
the lawn. cl921. 822 B855pl 

Cabell, James Branch. 

The jewel merchants. 1921. 812 C11 

Chapin, Harold. 

The philosopher of Butterbiggins ; a 
play in one act. 1921. (Repertory 
plays.) 822 C463p 



Cook, George Cram. 
The spring. 1921. 



812 C77 



De Mille, Cecil Blount. 

The Royal mounted. cl920. (French's 
standard library edition.) 812 D381 

Drinkwater, John. 

Oliver Cromwell ; a play. 1921. 

822 D78o 

Dunsany, Edward John Moreton Drax 
Plunkett, 18th baron. 
If, a play in four acts. [1921] 

822 D92i 
Gay, John. 

The beggar's opera. [1921] q822 G2 



Glaspell, Susan. 
Inheritors. cl921. 



812 G54i 



Goldberg, Isaac, trans. 

Plays of the Italian theatre [by] Ver 
ga, Morselli, Lopez, Pirandello. 
1921. 852 G61 

Hankin, St. John Emile Clavering, & 

Calderon, George.. .;:<- 

Thompson ; a comedy in three acts. 

1918. 822 H24t 

Harcourt, Cyril. 

"The intruder." cl920. (French's 
standard library edition.) 822 H25 

Housman, Laurence. 

The death of Orpheus. 1921. 

822 H84d 

Ibsen, Henrik. 

Early plays : Catiline, The warrior's 
barrow, Olaf Liljekrans. 1921. 
(Scandinavian classics, v. 17.) 

839.82 I14e 
i 
Jerome, Jerome Klapka. 

The passing of the third floor back. 
1921. 822 J 564 

Manners, John Hartley. 

The harp of life. cl921. 812 M28 

— ■ Peg o' my heart. cl91S. 



(French's standard library edition.) 
822 M28p 

Marlowe, Christopher. 

Marlowe's Edward II, ed. by William 
Dinsmore Briggs. 1914. 822 M34b 

Maugham, William Somerset. 

The circle ; a comedy in three acts. 
1921. 822 M44c 

Medwall, Henry. 

\ Fulgens and Lucres. 1920. (The 
Henry E. Huntington facsimile re- 
prints.) 822 M49 

jMerivale, Philip. 

1 The wind over the water. 1920. (The 
contemporary series.) 812 M563 

Millay, Edna St. Vincent. 

; Two slatterns and a king; a moral 
interlude. cl921. (Stewart Kidd 
modern plays.) 812 M64t 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



223 



Parker, Louis Napoleon. 

Pomander walk. cl915. (French's 
. standard library edition.) 822 P24p 

Phillips, Stephen. 

Collected plays. 1921. 822 P56c 

Contents: Alymer's secret. — Ulysses. 
— The sin of David. — Nero. — Faust. 
— Pietro of Siena. 

Ravindranatha, Thakura, Sir. 

The fugitive, by Rabindranath Tagore. 
1921. 891.442 R25f 

Rostetter, Alice. 

The widow's veil. 1920. (The flying 
stag plays for the little theatre.) 

812 R83 
Shakespeare, William. 

The tempest. 1921. (The works of 
Shakespeare.) 822.33 U7 

Tilley. Arthur Augustus. 

Moliere. 1921. 842 M72zt 

Wager, William. 

Enough is as good as a feast. 1920. 
(The Henry E. Huntington facsim- 
ile reprints.) 822 W13 

Waley, Arthur. 

The no plays of Japan. [1921] 

895.2 W17 
Yeats, William Butler. 

Four plays for dancers. 1921. 

822 Y41f 
Young, Rida Johnson. 

Brown of Harvard ; a play in four 
acts. cl909. (French's standard 
library edition.) 812 Y75 

Zangwill, Israel. 

The cockpit ; romantic drama in three 
acts. 1921. 822 Z29c 

CALIFORNIA FICTION. 

Beaumont, Gerald. 

Hearts and the diamond. 1921. 

cB379 
Duffus, Robert Luther. 

Roads going south. 1921. cD857 

Irwin, William Henry. 

Columbine time. 1921. c 1 725c 

Kenyon, Camilla. 

Spanish doubloons. cl919. cK37s 

Kyne, Peter Bernard. 

The go-getter ; a story that tells you 
how to be one. 1921. cK99go 



Newberry, Perry. 

Black Boulder claim. 1921. cN534 

BIOGRAPHY: COLLECTIVE. 

Abbott, Lyman. 

Silhouettes of my contemporaries. 

1921. 920.07 A13 

Admirals of British Navy. Portraits in 
colours, by Francis Dodd. 1917. 

q 923.5 A2 
Benson, Arthur Christopher. 

Men of might. 1921. 920 B47 



Blunt, Hugh Francis. 
Great penitents. 1921. 



922 B65 



Generals of the British army. Por- 
traits in colours, by Francis Dodd. 
1917. q 923.5 A2 

Raymond, E. T. 

Portraits of the nineties. 1921. 

920.042 R26p 
Sidebotham, Herbert. 

Political profiles from British public 
life. 1921. 920.042 S56 

Taylor, George Robert Stirling. 

Modern English statesmen. . 1920. 

923.2 T24 
Tilden, Sir William Augustus. 

Famous chemists. 1921. 925 T57 

Vizetelly, Francis Horace. 

Who? When? Where? What? cl920. 

920 V86 

BIOGRAPHY: INDIVIDUAL. 

Alcott. Alcott, Louisa May. 

Louisa May Alcott, her life, letters and 
journals. 1890. B A355c 

Arundel. Hervey, Mary Frederica So- 
phia. 
The life, correspondence and collections 
Thomas Howard, earl of Arundel. 
1921. B A793h 



Bronte. Senior, James. 
Patrick Bronte, c-1921. 



B B8695s 



Byron. Lovelace, Ralph Gordon Noel 
Milbanke, 2d earl of. 
Astarte. 1921. B B996lo 

Cawein. Rothert, Otto Arthur. 

The story of a poet : Madison Cawein. 
1921. (Filson club publications.) 

B C3835r 



224 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Chekhov. Pieshkov, Aleksiei Maksimo- 
vich [(£ others]. 
Reminiscences of Anton Chekhov. 

B C5152p 
Columbu. Menzies, Lucy. 

Saint Columba of Iona ; a study of his 
life, his times, and his influence. 
1920. B C726m 

Emerson. Snider, Denton Jaques. 

A biography of Ralph Waldo Emerson, 

set forth as his life essay. 1921. 

(The collected writings of Denton 

J. Snider.) B E53sn 

Evelyn. Evelyn, John. 

The early life and education of John 
Evelyn, 1620-1641. 1920. (Oxford 
historical and literary studies.) 

B E93s 
Guinea. Brown, Alice. 

Louise Imogen Guiney. 1921. 

B G964b 

Hamilton. Hamilton, Lord Frederick 
Spencer. 
The days before yesterday. [1920] 

B H2177 

Hergesheimer. Cabell, James Branch. 
Joseph Hergesheimer, an essay in in- 
terpretation. 1921. B H545c 

Higginson. Higginson, Thomas Went- 
worth. 
Letters and journals of Thomas Went- 
worth Higginson. 1921. B H6375 

Ismail Kamal. Isma'il Kamel, bey. 
The memoirs of Ismail Kemal bey. 
[1920] B 183s 

Jennings. Jennings. Henry James. 
Chestnuts and small beer. 1920. 

B J543 

King. Wendte, Charles William. 

Thomas Starr King, patriot and 
preacher. cl921. cB K543w 

Lane. Gregory, Isabella Augusta 

(Persse) lady. 

Hugh Lane's life and achievement, 

with some account of the Dublin 

galleries. 1921. B L2653g 

Lincoln. Conwell, Russell Herman. 
Why Lincoln laughed. 1922. 

B L736con 



Tarbell, Ida Minerva. 

Boy scouts' life of Lincoln. 1921. 

B L736tb 



Wiecker, Otho. 

The story of an artist while executing 
a portrait-sketch, the first from life, 
of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. 

B L736wi 

Louise. Louise, princess of Belgium. 
My own affairs. Tr. by Maude M. C, 
fifoulkes. cl921. B L8884f 

Malachy. Bernard de Clairvaux, Saint. 
St. Bernard of Clairvaux's Life of St. 
Malachy of Armagh. 1920. (Trans- 
lations of Christian literature. Lives 
of the Celtic saints.) B M236b 

Manning. Leslie, Shane. 

Henry Edward Manning, his life and 
labours. 1921. B M283I 

Marlborough. Atkinson, Christopher 
Thomas. 
Marlborough and the rise of the Brit- 
ish army. 1921. B M3473at 

Martineau. Martineau, Violet Isabel. 
John Martineau, the pupil of Kings- 
ley. 1921. B M 3854m 

Marx. Beer, Max. 

The life and teaching of Karl Marx. 
[1921] (Social studies series.) 

B M392b 
Meclinilcov. Mechnikov, Olga. 

Life of Elie Metchnikoff, 1845-1916. 
1921. B M486m 

Milet. Milet, Pierre. 

Captivity among the Oneidas in 1690- 
91 of Father Pierre Milet. 1897. 

B M 6435s 
Gift of Mrs. E. E. Ayer. 

Melville. Weaver, Raymond Melbourne. 

Herman Melville, mariner and mystic. 

cl921. B M5313w 

Napoleon. Geer, Walter. 

Napoleon the First. 1921. B N216ge 

Nichols. Nichols, George. 

A Salem shipmaster and merchant. 
1921. B N618n 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY, 



225 



Pitt. Harrison, Frederic. 

Chatham. 1911. (Twelve English 
statesmen.) B P688h 

Rosebery, Archibald Philip Prim- 



rose, 5th earl of. 
Pitt. 1921. (Twelve English states- 
men.) B P6883ro 

Ritchie. Ritchie, John Gerald. 
The Ritchies in India. 1920. 

B R611r 

Rohertson. Robertson, Sir William 
Robert, 1st hart. 
From private to field-marshal. 1921. 

B K6526 
Roll and. Zweig, Stefan. 

Romain Rolland. 1921. B R749z 

Sandeman. Tucker, Alexander Lauzun 
Pendock. 
Sir Robert G. Sandeman, k. c. s. i., 
peaceful conqueror of Baluchistan. 
1921. (Pioneers of progress. Em- 
pire builders.) B S214t 

Bpurgeon. Fullerton, William Young. 
C. H. Spurgeon, a biography. 1920. 

B S772f 

Stfibbins. Murdock, Charles Albert. 
Horatio Stebbins, his ministry and his 
personality. 1921. cB S811m 

Suvorov. Blease, Walter Lyon. 

Suvorof. 1920. B S9676b 

Swift. [Vanhomrigh, Esther]. 

Vanessa and her correspondence with 
Jonathan Swift. [1921] B S977v 

Teresa. Teresa, Saint. 
The life of St. Teresa of Jesus, of the 
Order of Our Lady of Carmel. 5th 
ed. 1916. B T316I 

Venizelos. Chester, Samuel Beach. 
Life of Venizelos. B V461c 

Verlainfi. Nicolson, Harold George. 
Paul Verlaine. [1920] B V521n 

Ward'. Martyn, Charles. 

Life of Artemas Ward, the first com- 
mander-in-chief of the American rev- 
olution. 1921. B W256m 



Washington. Washington, Booker Tal- 
iaferro. 
My larger education. 1911. B W317 

Wcnlok. Pearce, Ernest Harold, bp. of 
Worchester. 
Walter de Wenlok, abbot of West- 
minster. 1920. (Ecclesiastical bi- 
ographies.) B W476p 

Wilson. De Bratiie. Joseph. 

Woodrow Wilson. cl921. B W754de 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL: 
GENERAL. 

Barker, William Henry cC- Rees, Wil- 
liam. 
The making of Europe. 1920. 

911 B25 
Bowman, Isaiah. 

The new world. 1921. 910 B78 

Butler, Frank Hedges. 

Fifty years of travel by land, water, 
and air. [1921] 910 B98 

Hearnshaw, Fossey John Cobb. 

Macmillan's Historical atlas of modern 
Europe. 1920. q911 H4 

Stevenson, Edward Luther. 

Terrestrial and celestial globes ; their 
history and construction. 1921. 
(Hispanic society of America. Pub- 
lications.) 912 S84 

EUROPE. 

Bartholomew, John George. 

Handy reference atlas of London and 
suburbs. 1921. 914.21 B287 

Bell, Walter George. 

The Tower of London. 1921. 

914.21 B43 

Fedden, Mrs Katherine Waldo Douglas. 
The Basque country. 1921. 

914.6 F29 
Goff, A. & Fawcett, H. A. 

Macedonia, a plea for the primitive. 
1921. 914.96 G61 

Henderson, Helen Weston. 
A loiterer in Paris. cl921. 

914.43 H49 



226 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Hopkins, R. Thurston. 

Kipling's Sussex. 1921. 914.2 H795 

Lawrence, David Herbert. 

Sea and Sardinia. 1921. 914.59 L41 

McKenna, Stephen. 

While I remember, cl921. 

914.2 M155 

Mackenzie, Osgood Hanbury. 

A hundred years in the Highlands. 
1921. 914.1 M15 

Poyntee, Mrs Mary Augusta Mason 
(Dickinson.) 
When Turkey was Turkey. 1921. 

914.96 P89 
Schwartz, Dmitri Alexander. 
The voice of Russia. cl921. 

914.7 S39 
Willis, Nathaniel Parker. 

Pencillings by the way : written during 
some years of residence and travel 
in Europe. 1853. 914 W73p 

Gift of Mrs. Hilby. 

ASIA. 

Curtis, William Eleroy. 

Turkestan : "the heart of Asia," 

915.8 C98 
Gamble, Sidney David. 

Peking, a social survey. cl921. 

915.1 G19 
Gull. Mrs Beatrix M. 

A tour in Mongolia. 1920. 

915.17 G97 
Maxwell, Donald. 

A dweller in Mesopotamia. 1921. 

q915.6 M4 

A painter in Palestine. 1921. 

915.69 M46 
Stidger, William Le Roy. 

Flash-lights from the seven seas. 
cl921. 915 S85 

Street, Julian Leonard. 

Mysterious Japan. 1921. 915.2 S91 

UNITED STATES. 

Bailey, Almira. 

Vignettes of San Francisco. cl921. 
Gift of author. c917.9461 B15 



Bose, Sudhindra,. 

Fifteen years in America. 1920. 

917.3 B74 
Braddon, Henry Yule. 

American impressions. 1920. 

917.3 B79 
Faris, John Thomson. 

Seeing the sunny South. 1921. 

917.5 F22 

Heming, Arthur Henry Howard. 

The drama of the forests, romance and 
adventure. 1921. 917.12 H48 

Williams, Joseph. 

Narrative of a tour from the state of 
Indiana to the Oregon territory in 
the years 1841-2. 1921. 

c917.8 W724 
Wilstach, Paul. 

Potomac landings. 1921. 

917.52 W75 

SOUTH AMERICA. 

Fraxck, Harry Alverson. 

Working north from Patagonia. 1921. 

918 F82w 

Graham, Robert Gallnigad Bontine Cun- 
ninghame. 
Cartagena and the banks of the Sinii. 
1920. q918.6 G7 

Stahl, Ferdinand A. 

In the lands of the Ineas. el 920. 

Gift of author. c918 S78 

HISTORY: GENERAL. 

Croce, Benedetto. 

History, its theory and practice. 1921. 
(European library.) 901 C937 

Earle, Edward Mead. 

An outline of modern history ; a sylla- 
bus with map studies. 1921. 

909.8 E12 
Hasluck, Eugene Lewis. 

The teaching of history. 1920. (Cam- 
bridge handbooks for teachers.) 

907 H35 
Marshall, Richard Lucas. 

The historical criticism of documents. 
1920. (Helps for students of his- 
tory.) 902 H48 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



227 



Marvin, Francis Sydney, ed. 

The evolution of world-peace. 1921. 
(The unity series.) 901 M39e 

Tryon, Rolla Milton. 

The teaching of history in junior and 
senior high schools. cl921. 907 T87 

Van Loon, Hendrik Willem. 

The story of mankind. 1921. 909 V26 

Wallis, John Eyre Winstanley. 

English regnal years and titles. 1921. 
(Helps for students of history.) 

902 H48 

EUROPE. 

Abbott, George Frederick. 

Under the Turk in Constantinople. 

1920. 949.6 A13u 

Barton. Sir Dunbar Plunket, hart. 
Bernadotte and Napoleon, 1703-1S10. 

1921. 948 B29 

Beesly, Edward Spencer. 

Queen Elizabeth. 1920. (Twelve En- 
glish statesmen.) 942.05 B41 

Bell, Walter George. 

More about unknown London. 1921. 
942.1 B43m 
Clark, Charles Upson. 

Greater Roumania. 1922. 949.8 C59 

Durham, Mary Edith. 

Twenty years of Balkan tangle. 
[1920] 949.7 D96t 

Fletcher, Joseph Smith. 

Harrogate and Knaresborough. 1920. 
(The story of the English towus. ) 

942.7 F61h 



Pontefract. 1920. (The story of 

the English towns.) 942.7 F61p 

Gosselin, Louis Leon Theodore. 
The Dauphin (Louis XVII). 1921. 

944.04 G67d 
Herbert, Sydney. 

The fall of feudalism in France. 1921. 
944.04 H53 

Krey, August Charles, ed. and trans. 
The first crusade ; the accounts of eye- 
witnesses and participants. 1921. 

940.4 K92 



Massey, William Thomas. 

Allenby's final triumph. 1920. 

940.942 M41a 

Morgan, Robert Burns, cd. 

Readings in English social history 
from contemporary literature. 1921. 
2 v. 942 M84 

Roberts, Katherine Emily & Roberts, 
Robert Edwin. 
Peterborough. 1920. (The story of 
the English towns.) 942.5 R64 

Robinson, James Harvey & Beard, 
Charles Austin. 

History of Europe ; our own time. 

cl921. 940.8 R66 

Roy, James Alexander. 

Pole and Czech in Silesia. 1921. 

943.7 R88 

Snyder, Mrs Alice Ziska i£- Snyder, Mil- 
ton Valentine. 
Paris days and London nights. cl921. 
940.935 S67 

Trowbridge, William Rutherford Hayes. 
Queen Alexandria. 1921. 942.08 T86 

Vopicka, Charles J. 

Secrets of the Balkans ; seven years of 
a diplomatist's life in the storm cen- 
tre of Europe. 1921. 949.7 V95 

Williams, Albert Rhys. 

Through the Russian revolution. 1921. 
947.08 W721 

UNITED STATES. 

Chapman, Charles Edward. 

A history of California ; the Spanish 
period. 1921. c979.4 C46h 

Damon, Charles Ripley, camp. 

The American dictionary of dates, 458— 
1920. cl921. r973 D16 

Gathorne-Hardy. Geoffrey Malcolm. 
The Norse discoverers of America, the 
Wineland sagas. 1921. 973.1 G25 

Harris, James Rendel. 

The finding of the "Mayflower." 1920. 
974.4 H31f 



228 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Harris, James Rendel, ed. 

Souvenirs of the "Mayflower" tercen- 
tenary. 1920. nos. 1-4. 974.4 H31 

Hayes, Ellen. 

Wild turkeys and tallow candles. 

1920. 977.1 H41 

Hornaday, John R . 

The book of Birmingham. 1921. 

976.11 B61 
Howland, Harold Jacobs. 

Theodore Roosevelt and his times. 

1921. (Chronicles of America.) 

973 C55 

Leiding, Mrs Harriette (Kershaw). 
Historic houses of South Carolina. 
1921. 975.7 L52 

McKim, Randolph Harrison. 
A soldier's recollections. 1921. 

973.7 M15 
Morison, Samuel Eliot. 

The maritime history of Massachu- 
setts. 1921. 974.4 M86 

Olds, Fred A. 

Story of the counties of North Caro- 
lina. 975.6 044 

Gift of North Carolina historical 
association. 

Ridgley, Douglas Clay. 

The geography of Illinois. cl921. (Re- 
gional geographies of the United 
States of America.) 977.3 R54 

Wilson, Woodrow, pres. U. S. 

Division and reunion . . . with addi- 
tional chapters bringing the narra- 
tive down to the end of 1918, by 
Edward S. Corwin. 1921. 

973 W75d1 

MEXICO. 

Blakeslee, George Hubbard, ed. 

Mexico and the Caribbean. 1920. 
(Clark university addresses.) 

972 B63 
Dillon, Emile Joseph. 

Mexico on the verge. cl921. 

972 D57 
Vera Estaiiol, Jorge. 

Carranza and his bolshevik regime. 
1920. C 972 V47 

Gift of author. 



EUROPEAN WAR. 

Buxton, Charles Roden d Buxton, Mrs 
Dorothy Frances (Jebb). 
The world after the war. [1920] 

940.98 B99 

iCallwell, Sir Charles Edward. 

Experiences of a dug-out, 1914-1918. 
1920. 940.942 C16 

JDawes, Charles Gates. 

A joui*nal of the great war. 1921. 
2 v. 940.935 D26 

IDurnford, Hugh George Edmund. 

The tunnellers of Holzminden (with a. 
side-issue). 1920. 940.936 D96 

jEveritt, Nicholas. 

British secret service during the great 
war. [1920] 940.921 E93 

iJoiiNSON, Douglas Wilson. 

Battlefields of the world war. 1921. 
940.91 J 66 
iJoiiNSON, Severance. 

The enemy within ; hitherto unpub- 
lished details of the great conspiracy 
to corrupt and destroy France. 1919. 
940.944 J 69 
;Katz, Harry Lewis. 

A history of The Stars and stripes, 
official newspaper of the American 
expeditionary forces in France. 
cl921. q940.973 K1 

Lavine, A. Lincoln. 

Circuits of victory. 1921. 

940.973 L41 

Neumann, Georg Paul, comp. 

The German air force in the great 
war. 1921. 940.933 N49 

Nichols, Susan Farley. 

"Water colors,'' south of France, 1918- 
1919. 1921. 940.936 N62 

Orpen, Sir William. 

An onlooker in France, 1917-1919. 
1921. q940.935 07 

Perris, George Herbert. 
The battle of the Marne. [1920] 

940.932 P45 
Sparrow, Walter Shaw. 

The fifth army in March, 1918. 1921. 
940.942 S73 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



229 



FRENCH LANGUAGE. 
Adam, Paul Auguste Marie. 

Reims devastee. 1920. (Collection 
"L-a France devastee." ser. 1 : Les 
regions.) 726 A19 

Anecdotes, sur la cour et l'interieur de 
la famille de Napoleon Bonaparte. 
1818. 944.05 A57 



Apollinaire, Guillaume. 
La femme assise. 1920. 



843 A64 



Arlon, Benedict H. d' cC- Gielly, George 
A. 
La correspondence elenientaire. cl920. 
(Gregg modern language series.) 

658 A72 

Artaud de Montor, Alexis Frangois. 
Italie. 1S35. (Lunivers.) *945 A78 

Art et decoration ; revue mensuelle d'art 
moderne. v. 1-33 ; 35, 36. 1897- 
1913; 1914-1919. q705 A7ad 

Association nationale russe pour la 
ligue des nations. 
Pour les droits internationaux de la 
pense nationale russe, une annee de 
luttes octobre 1919-octobre 1920. 1 
(Apergu historique. 2) Documents. 
1920. 341.1 A84 

Gift of Victor Hugo Duras. 

Aucassin et Nicolette. 

Aucassin et Nicolete, ed. by F. W. 
Bourdillon. 1919. (Modern lan- 
guage texts. French ser. : Mediae- 
val section.) 843 A89b 

Audoux, Marguerite. 

L"atelier re Marie-Claire, roman. 1920. 
843 A9lat 

Avezac [de Castera-Macaya, Marie Ar- 

mand Pascal] d'. 

Afrique. Esquisse generale de 1'- 

Afrique, et Afrique ancienne. 1S44. 

*960 AS5 

Bainvtlle, Jacques. 

Les consequences politiques de la paix. 
1920. 940.98 B16 



Balmes, Jaime Luciano. 

Le Protestantisme compare au Catho- 
licisme dans ses rapports avec la civ- 
ilisation Europeenne. 11th ed. 1S83. 
3 v. *282 B19p 

Barres, Maurice. 

Les traits eternels de la France. 1916. 

914.4 B27 

Bazin, Rene. 

La closerie de Champdolent. cl917. 

843 B36c 

Beauciiesne, Alcide Hyacinthe du Bois 
de. 
La vie de Madame .Elizabeth, soeur de 
Louis XVI. 2d. ed. 1870*. 2 v. 

B E439b 

Benedite, Leouce. 

Exposition universelle de 1900. [1900] 

606 B4 



Benoit, Pierre. 

L'Atlantide. cl920. 

' — Le lac sale. cl921. 



843 B47a 
843 B47 



Pour Don Carlos, roman. cl920. 

843 B47p 

Bertall, Charles Albert d' Arnould. 
La vie hors de chez soi. 1876. 

q914.4 B5a 

Besenval, Pierre Victor, baron de. 
Memoires. 1S05-6. 4 v. 944.03 B55 

Boileau-Despreatjx, Nicolas. 

Oeuvres de Boileau Despraeux. Nou- 
velle edition. 1817. *848 B67 

Bossuet, Jacques Benigne, bp. of Meuax. 
Discours sur l'historie universelle. 

*q909 B7 

Oraisous funebres. 1835. 

*252 B74 

Bourget, Paul Charles Joseph. 
Un coeur de femme. 1S90. 

843 B77coe 
Bourgoin, Jules. 

Les elements del Tart arabe. Le trait 
des entrelacs. 1879. q745 B7 



♦Donated by Miss Annette G. Girard. 



230 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Precis de Tart arabe et materiaux 

pour servir a la histoire, a la theorie 
et la technique des arts de l'Orient 
musulman. 1892. f 709.53 B7 

Bouteiller, Ernest de & Braux, G. de. 

Nauvelles recherches sur la fammile de 

Jeanue d'Arc. Enquetes enedites 

genealogie. 1879. B J43bou 

Brillat-Savarin, Jean Antbelme. 

Physiologie du gout, suivi de La gas- 
tronomic, par Berchoux ; L'art diner 
en ville, par Colnet. Nouvelle 
edition. 1880. *641 B85p 



Bruwaert, Edmond. 
Vie de Jacques Callot, 
1592-1635. 1912. 



>raveur lorrain, 
q760 C1 



BXJSSY, Roger de Rabutin, comic de. 
Les memoires. 1704. B B981 

Cabanes, Auguste. 

Le cabinet secret de l*bistoire. Nou- 
velle ed., revue et tres augumentee. 
1905. 4 v. q944 C1 

[Catrou, Francois]. 
Histoire des Anabaptistes. 1700. 

284.3 C36 

Cenprars, Blaise. 

Dix-neuf poemes elastiques. 1019. 

841 C39d 

Du nionde entier. 1919. 841 C39 



Ciiampeatjx, Alfred de. 

Portefeuille des arts decoratifs public 
sous le patronage de 1'Union des arts 
decoratifs. [18S8J-1898. 10 v. 

f745 C4 



Champion, Edouard. 
Hommage a Stendhal. 
Gift of author. 



1920. B B573c 



Champollion-Pigeac, Jacques Joseph. 
Egypte ancienne. 1876. (L'univers.) 

*932 C45 

Chateaubriand, Francois Auguste Rene. 
vicomte de. 
Etudes ou discours historiques sur la 
chute de l'empire romain. 1861. 

*937 C49 



Chevalier, Joseph Philippe. 

L'Immense tresor des sciences and des 
arts. 13th ed. *603 C52 

Chinard, Gilbert. 

E'exotisme americain dans l'oeuvre de 
Chateaubriand. 1918. (Semicenten- 
nial publications of the University 
of California, 1868-1918.) 843 C49z 

Cicero, Marcus Tullius. 

Oeuvres completes de Ciceron. 1867- 
74. 20 v. (Bibliotheque latine-fran- 
caise.) *875 C56c 

Collection de douze vues de Waterloo. 
[1S15] 914.93 C69 

Comines, Philippe de, sieur d'Argenton. 

Memoires. Nouv. ed., revue sur plus- 

ieurs manuscripts du terns, enrich ie 

de notes and de figures. 1747. 4 v. 

q944.02 C7 

Curtius Rufus, Quintus. 

Oeuvres completes de Quinte-Curce, 
avec la traduction franchise de la 
collection Panckoucke par MM. Au- 
guste et Alphonse Trognon. Nou- 
velle ed. revue par M. E. Pesson- 
neaux. *878 C98o 

Dauzat, Albert. 

Legendes, propheties et superstitions 
de la guerre. 940.91 D24 

Defrasnay, Pierre, trans. 

Mythologie ; ou, Recueil des fables 

grecques Esopiques et sybaritiques, 

mises ne vers francois. 1750. 2 v. 

888 D31 

Delarue-Mardrus, Lucie. 

L'ame aux trois visages. 1919. 

843 D339am 

Delille, Jacques Montanier. 

Oeuvres choisies de Delille. 1856. 

Contents: Notice biographiques et lit— 
teraire sur J. Delille [par Mme. Woil- 
lez] — Les Georgiques de Virgile, texte 
et traduction. — Les jardins. — L'hom- 
me des champs. — Malheur et pitie. 

*841 D35o 

Demogeot, Jacques Claude. 

Histoire de la litterature franchise de- 

puis ses origines jusqu a nos jours. 

19e ed. 1882. (Historie univer- 

selle.) *840.9 D38 



♦Donated by Miss Annette G. Girard. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



231 



Desjardins, Gustav Adolphe. 

Recharches sur les drapeaux francais. 
1874. q929.9 D4 

DOBRYNINE, V. 

La lutte contre le bolchevisme dans la 
Russie meridionale. 1920. 
Gift of author. 947.08 D53 

Doney, Mgr Jean Marie. 

Cathechisme du concile de Trente. 
1826. 4 v. in 3. *270.6 D6S 

Dubeux, Louis. 

La Perse. 1841. (L'univers.) 

*955 D81 

Duhamel, Georges. 

Lapointe et Ropiteau. 1919. 842 D86 

Dumas, Alexandre. 

Les Mohicans de Paris. 4 v. (Oeuvres 
completes.) 843 D88mol 

La question d'argent ; comedie en 

cinq actes. cl919. 842 D88q 



Salvator; suite et fin des Mohi- 

• cans de Paris. 5 v. (Oeuvres com- 
pletes.) 843 D88s 

Dupont-Auberviixe, 

L'ornement des tissus ; recueil histor- 
ique et pratique ; ouvrage ed. sous 
la direction de M. Bachelin-Deflor- 
enne. 1877. f745 D9 

Duruy, Victor. 

Italie ancienne. 2 v. 1850-51 (L'- 
univers.) *937 D96 

Encyclopediana. Recueil d'anecdotes 
anciennes, modernes et contempo- 
raines. Nouvelle ed. 848 E56 

Enlart, Camille. 

Origines franchises de l'architecture 
gothique en Italie. 1894. 723.5 E58 

L'Espagne monumentale ; architecture 

and sculpture, ensembles and details. 

q709.46 E7 

Fenelon, Frangois de Salignac de La 
Mothe- 
Xouveaux dialogues des morts. contes 
and fables, avec un abrege des vies 
des anciens philosophes. 1727, 3 v. 
in 1. *848 F33 



Fraipont, Gustave. 

Decorations florales, vingt planches en 
couleurs. [10O4] f745 F8 

Francois de Sales (Saint). 

Lettres pieuses ; extraites de la corres- 
pondance. 1848. (Bibliotheque 

pieuse des Maisons d'education.) 

*B F825 

FurtwAngler, Adolf. 

La collection Sabouroff ; monuments de 
l'art Grec. [1886] 2 v. f733 F9c 



Gasquet, Joachim. 

L'art vainqueur. 1919. 



808.1 G24 



Gazette des beaux-arts. v. 1-25. 1859- 
1868; 2 per., v. 1-38, 1869-1888; 
3 per. v. 1— 10, 1SS9-190S ; 4 per. 
1-15, 1909-1919. 
Tables generales des cinquante prem- 
ieres annees. 1859-1908. 1910-15. 
2 v. q705 G2 

Gelis-Didot, Pierre. 

La peinture decorative en France. 
1897-99. f729.4 G3 

Gide, Andre Paul Guillaume. 

La symphonic pastorale. 4th ed. 1921. 

843 G45s 

Grandmougin, Charles. 

Les chansons du village. 1889. 

841 G75c 

! A pleines voiles. Poesies, avec 

une portrait de l'auteur. 1SSS. 

841 G75 

Grelling, Richard. 
J'accuse ! 1919. 



940.912 G82a 



Gusman, Pierre. 

L'art decoratif de Rome de la fin de 

la repvbliqve av IV e siecle. [1908] 

v. 1 and 3. f745 G98 



Hanotaux, Gabriel. 
Jeanne d'Arc. 1911. 



qB J43h 



Histoire de l'invasion allemande dans les 
provinces de Namur et de Luxem- 
bourg, v 1-2. 1919-20. 

q940.91 H6 

Hottenroth, Friedrich. 

Le costume chez les peuples anciens et 
modernes. Nouvelle serie. 391 H83 



♦Donated by Miss Annette G. Girard. 



232 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Houssaye, Arsene. 

Les mains pleines de roses, pleines d'or, 
et pleines de sang. 1874. 843 H84 

Huard, Lucien. 

La science pratique. *q608 H8 

Huysmans, Joris Karl. 

L'oblat. 843 H98o 

Jaloux, Edrnond. 

La fin d'un beau jour. cl921. 

843 J 26 

Jolimont, Frangois Gabriel Theodore 
Busset de. 
Les Principalis edifices de la ville de 
Rouen en 1525. 1845. q724.1 J7 

Jouannin, Joseph Marie, c£- Van Garver, 
Jules. 
Turquie. 1840. (L'univers.) 

*949.6 J86 

Korsak, Albert de, ed. 

Les grands architectes frangais. [1884] 

q729 K8 

Laclos, Pierre Ambroise Frangois Cho- 
derlos de. 
Poesies de Choderlos de Laclos, pub- 
lees par Arthur Symon et Louis 
Thomas. 1908. 841 L14 



La Fontaine, Jean de. 

Fables de La Fontaine. M. Bourrelly. 
1872. 841 L16b 



Fables de LaFontaine, precedees 

de la vie d' Esope. Nouvelle ed. 
1841. *841 L16a 

Langlois, Eustache Hyacinthe. 

Essai historique et descriptif sur la 
peinture sur verre. 1832. 748 L28 



Memoire sur la peinture sur 

verre, et sur quelques vitraux re- 
marquables des eglises de Rouen. 
1823. 748 L28 

La litterature frangaise contempo- 
raine. Recueil en prose et en vers de 
morceaux, empruntes aux ecrivains 
les plus renommes du xixe ciecle. 
2e ed., corrigee. 1868. *840.8 L77 



La Rochefoucauld, Frangois VI, due 

de, prince de Marcillac. 

Reflexions ou sentences et maximes 

morales de La Rochefoucauld. 1822. 

848 L32 

Larrouy, Maurice. 

Les vagabonds de la gloire. 1917-19. 
3 v. 940.934 L33 

La Sizeranne, Robert de. 

L'art pendant la guerre 1914-1918. 

1919. 709 L34 

■ La photographie, est-elle un art? 

1899. q770 L3 

I La Vicomterie de Saint-Samson, Louis 

de]. 

Les crimes des ernpereurs d'Allemagne, 

depuis Lothaire I jusqu'a Leopold 

II. 1793. 943 L41 

Lawrence, Thomas Joseph. 

Les principes de droit international. 

1920. (Publications de la Dotation 
Carnegie pour la paix internation- 
ale. Division de droit international, 
Washington.) q341 L4 

Le Bas, Philippe. 

Allemagne. 1838-1841. 2 v. (L'- 
univers.) *943 L44 

Asie Mineure. 1878. (L'univers.) 

*956 L44 



— Etats de la Confederation ger- 
manique. 1842. (L'univers.) 

*943 L44e 



Le Braz, Anatole. 
La terre du passe. 



844 L45 



Lecuyer, Mme. Andree (Husson). 

Pour moi seule. Roman, [par] Andre 
Corthis [pseud, 1919] 843 L47 

Le livre de la ferme et des maisons de 

campagne. 

Quatrieme edition entierement refon- 

due, [par] M. Pierre Joigneaux. 2 v. 

*q630 L7 

Lenoir, Marie Alexandre. 

Musee des monumens frangais. 1800- 
1S06. 5 v. in 6. 734 L57 



♦Donated by Miss Annette G. Girard, 






vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



233 



Musee des monumens frangais ; 

historie de la peinture sur verre. 
1803. 748 L57 

Le Roux, Philibert Joseph. 

Dictionnaire comique, satyrique, cri- 
tique, burlesque, libre et proverbial. 
1752. 2 v. in 1. 447 L61 

Lescure, A. 

Mouchoirs brodes, milieu du dix-neuv- 
ieme siecle. f746 L6 

Lostalot, [de Bachoue] Alfred de. 
Les arts du bois. (Dessins et mod- 
ules.) q736 L8 

Loti, Pierre, [pseud.]. 

Figures et ehoses qui passaieut. 
[1898] 844 L88f 



Prime jeuuesse. cl919. 

Louisy, Paul. 

L'ancienue France. 18SG. 



843 L88pr 



q655 L8 



Macler, Frederic. 

Miniatures armeniennes : vies du 
Christ, peintures ornementales (Xe 
au XVIIe siecle). 1913. q096 M1 

Mallarme, Stephane. 

Vers de circonstance. 1920. 841 M25 



Maupassant, Guy de. 

Au soleil. 



Des vers. 
L'inutile beaute. 



914.4 M45 
841 M45 
843 M45i 



Le rosier de Madame Husson. 

843 M45r 



Theatre. 
Toine. 



842 M452 

843 M45t 



Mauriac, Frangois. 

La chair et le sang. 1920. 843 M454 

Maurois, Andre. 

Les silences du colonel Bramble. 191S. 

843 M457 

Les medailles des concours d'architec- 
ture de l'Ecole nationale cles beaux- 
arts a Paris. Annee scolaire 5 e -15 e , 
1902-1913. f720 M4 



Michaud, Regis. 

Mystiques et realistes anglo-saxons d'- 
Emerson a Bernard Shaw. 1918. 

810.9 M62 

Michel, Francisque Xavier. 

Recherches sur le commerce, la fabri- 
cation et I'usage des etoffes de soie, 
d'or et d' argent, et autres tissues 
precieux en Occident. 1S52-54. 2 
v. in 1. 677 M62 

Modelli d'arte decorativa. 7 v. 

q745 M6 

Montrosier, Eugene. 

Salon des aquarellistes frangais. 1SS7. 
q759.4 M8 

Morillot, Paul. 

Le roman francais durant 1'epoque 
classique. (1G10-1S00.) [1921] 

843 M85 
Nebel, Carl. 

Voyage pittoresque et archeologique 
dans la partie la plus interessante du 
Mexique. 1836. f972 N3 

Necker, Albertine Adrienne (De Saus- 
rure) . 
Notice sur le caractere et les ecrits de 
Madame de Stael. 1820. B S778n 



Perochon, Ernest. 
NCne. 1920. 



843 P453 



Pe'tronius, Arbiter. 

Oeuvres completes de Petrone avec la 
traduction francaise, par M. Heguin 
de Guerle. *877 P49o 

Philippe, Charles Louis. 

Bubu de Montparnasse. 1919. 

843 P55b 

Pinet, Gaston Leon Edouard. 

Historie de l'Ecole polytechnique. 
1887. q378.44 P6 

Plinius, Caecilius Secundus, Caius. 
Lettres de Pline le jeune, traduites en 
francais par de Sacy et J. Pierrot. 
( Bibliotheque latine-francaise. ) 

*876 P72s 

Pokche, Francois. 

La jeune fille aux joues roses ; comedie 
en trois actes. 1919. 842 P83j 



♦Donated by Miss Annette G. Girard. 



234 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Pouqueviixe, Francois Charles Hugues 
Laurent. 
Grece. 1835. (L'univers.) *938 P87 

Prevost, Marcel. 

Mon cher Tommy. cl920. 

843 P94mo 
Regnaud, Marguerite. 

Le poids du passe. cl919. 843 R339 

Reinach, Salomon. 

Recueil de teres antiques ideales et 
idealisees. 1903. 733 R36r 

Ricci, Seymour de. 

Der stil Louis XVI ; Mobiliar und 
Raumkunst. cl913. q749 R4 

Rolland, Romain. 

Clerambault ; historie d'une conscience 
libre pendant la guerre. cl920. 

843 R74cl 

Liluli, illustrations d'apres les 

bois de Frans Masereel. 1920? 

842 R74I 
Romains, Jules. 

Donogoo Tonka ; ou, Les miracles de 
la science, conte cinematographique. 
1920. 778 R75 

Rousseau, Jean Jacques. 

L'etat de guerre and Projet de paix 

perpetuelle ; with introduction and 

notes by Shirley G. Patterson. 1920. 

172.4 R86 

Roy, Joseph Edmond. 

Histoire du notariat au Canada depuis 
la fondation de la colonie jusqu'ii nos 
jours. 1899-1902. 4 v. 

Saint-Albin, Alexandre de. 

Les Francs-Macone et les societes se- 
cretes. 1867. 366.1 S13 

Saint-Pierre, Jacques Henri Bernar- 
din de. 
Etudes de la nature.. 1S59. *844 S14 

Shaw, George Bernard. 

Candida, un mystere en trois actes. 

Version francaise, par A. and H. 

Hamon. 190S. 822 S53ca 

Simoneton, Adrien. 

Materiaux and documents d'art decor- 
atif. 2 v. in 1. q747 S5 



Soupault, Philippe. 
Rose des vents. 1920. 



841 S72 



Stael-Holstein, Anne Louise Germaine 
(Necker) iaronne de. 
Delphine. 1875. *843 S77d 

Swift, Jonathan. 

Voyages de Gulliver, traduction nou- 
velle et complete, par B. H. Gaus- 
seron. q823 S9 

Tacitus, Cornelius. 

Oeuvres completes de Tacite, avec la 
traduction en frangais. 1877. 

*q878 Tin 
Tasso, Torquato. 

Jerusalem delivree. 1761. *851 T21 



Tinayre, Mine. Marcelle. 
Persephone. cl920. 



843 T58p 



Toussaint, Louis. 

Le vieux Paris, de Saint-Severin a 
Saint-Etienne-du-Mont. Preface de 
Jules Claretie. 1909. f769 T7 

Triepel, Heinrich. 

Droit international et droit interne, 
tr. par Rene Brunet. 1920. (Pub- 
lications de la Dotation Cai-negie 
pour la paix international. Division 
de droit international, Washington.) 
q341 T8 
Vallet, L. 

A travers l'Europe croquis de caval- 
erie. 1893. q357 V1 

Valois, Adrien de. 

Valesiana ; ou, Les pense'es critiques, 
historiques et morales, et les poesies 
latines. 1694. 848 V19 

Verhaeren, Emile. 

Helene de Sparte ; Les Aubes. 6eme 
ed. 1920. 842 V51h 

Verona, Guido da. 

La vie commence demain, traduit de 
l'ltalien, par F. Le Henaff. [Ed. 
9] cl919. 853 V54 

Veuillot, Louis. 

Les pelerinages de Suisse. [1838] 

*914.94 V59 
Vildrac, Charles. 

Chants du desespere (1914-1920). 
1920. 841 V69 



♦Donated by Miss Annette G. Girard. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



235 



CALIFORNIA STATE PUBLICA- 
TIONS RECEIVED DURING JAN 
UARY, FEBRUARY AND MARCH, 
1922.f 

Many of the administrative depart- 
ments of the state are from time to 
time publishing reports, bulletins, etc., 
which are of considerable interest. Copies 
can usually be obtained free by writing 
to the departments issuing them. The 
publications of the University of Cali- 
fornia are offered for sale or in exchange 
by the University Press, Berkeley, with 
the exception of the publications of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station and 
some of the administrative bulletins, 
which are distributed free. Most of the 
publications of the State Mining Bureau 
are required by law to be sold. Price is 
given after each entry. The titles are 
listed in News Notes of California Li- 
braries as they are received at the State 
Library. 

Agriculture, State Board of. List 
of exhibitors and awards made at the 
sixty-seventh annual California state fair. 
September 3-11, 1921. 1922. SO p. 

Agriculture, State Department of. 
Agricultural statutes of the state of Cali- 
fornia corrected to November 1, 1921. 
Part 1. Plant industry, weights and 
measures, markets. [1922] 279 p. 24°. 

■ Same, part 2. Animal indus- 



try. 1921. 245 p. 24° 



Directory of nurserymen, 1921- 



1922. 1922. 21 p. 



Monthly bulletin, vol. 10, no. 

10, October, 1921. p. 393-554. illus. 

Proceedings of the fifty-fourth con- 
vention of Fruit Growers and Farm- 
ers, Los Angeles, California, October 
24-26, 1921. 

Same, vol. 10, nos. 11-12, 



November-December, 1921. p. 559-7U3. 
illus. 

Second report California Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, for the period 
ending December 31, 1921.. 

Index, p. 755-63. 

Same, vol. 11, no. 1, January, 



1922. p. 1-72. illus. 



fExcept when otherwise noted publica- 
tions are printed at the state printing 
office, Sacramento, and are octavo in size. 



Same. vol. 11, nos. 2-3, Febru- 
ary-March, 1922. p. 73-300, i-xxii. illus. 
Weeds of California and methods 
of control. 

— Report of Division of Animal 



Industry. 1922. p. 054-729. maps, illus. 

Reprinted from Monthly bulletin, 
November-December, 1921. 

Special publication no. 19. 



Growing and shipping of California let- 
tuce. 1922. 14 p. illus. 

List of Special publications, p. 14. 

Banks, Superintendent of ( San 
Francisco).* Twelfth annual report 
showing the financial condition of state 
banks at the close of busine'ss June 30, 

1921. 1921. 712 p. tables. 

California School for the Deaf and 
Blind (Berkeley). The California news, 
vol. 37, nos. 5-6, January-February, 

1922. 4°. 

Charities and Corrections, State 
Board of (San Francisco). Monthly 
census of inmates of state institutions. 
Bulletins nos. 210>-21S, December, 1921, 
to February, 1922. 

Mimeographed sheets. 

Control, Board of. California and 
the oriental, Japanese, Chinese and Hin- 
dus. Report of State Board of Control 
of California to Gov. Wm. D. Stephens, 
June 19, 1920. Revised to January 1, 
1922. 1922. 250 p. maps. 

Rules governing the presenta- 
tion and audit of claims. 1922. 30 p. 
24°. 

Controller. Inheritance tax act of 
California. 1921. 175 p. 

Education, State Board of. Bulletin 
no. 3. List of high school textbooks. 
(Revised, January, 1922.) 1922. 32 p. 

Bulletin no. 10-S. Regulations 



governing educational institutions accred- 
ited to recommend individuals for special 
certificates and certification of teachers 
of special subjects. October, 1920. 1921. 



*The location of an office or institution 
is in Sacramento, except when otherwise 
noted. 



236 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



— Directory-bulletin (1021-22). 

Directory of secondary schools and teach- 
ers colleges for the school year 1921- 
1922. November, 1921. 1922. 240 p. 

Finance Department. Children's Aid 
Bureau. California Juvenile Court law, 
1921 supplement. 1922. 20 p. 24°. 

— ■ Laws of California and rules 



of the Department of Finance relating 
to state aid for needy children. 1921. 
31 p. 24°. 

Fish and Game Commission (San 
Francisco). California fish and game, 
vol. 8, no. 1, January, 1922. 1922. p. 
1-60. illus. 

Forestry, State Board of. Forest 
fire laws and regulations, 1921. 1922. 
87 p. 16°. 

Shade and ornamental trees of 



California, by Merritt B. Pratt, State 
Forester. [1922] 132 p. illus. 

Health, State Board of. Monthly 

bulletin, vol. 17, no. 4. October, 1921. 

1921. p. 163-198. 

Control of diphtheria; Public health 
nursing. 

Special bulletin no. 41. The 



care of the teeth. 1922. S p. illus. 



Weekly bulletin vol. 1, nos. 1- 



6, February 18-March 25, 1922. 

Industrial Accident Commission 
(San Francisco). California safety news, 
vol. 6, nos. 1-3, January-March, 1922. 
illus. 

Reported decisions, bulletins. 



nos. 12-16. 1922. 



Bulletin no. 12 contains index for 
Bulletins nos? 1-11. 



Labor Statistics, Bureau of (San 
Francisco). Labor laws of the state of 
California, 1921. 1922. 292 p. 16°. 

Laws pertaining to the employ- 



ment of children. 1922. 26 p. 



Legislative Counsel Bureau. Con- 
stitution of the State of California and 
summary of amendments ; to which are 
appended Magna Charta, Declaration of 
Rights, Declaration of Independence, The 
Articles of Confederation and the Con- 
stitution of the United States. 1922. 
398 p. 16°. 

Legislature. Journal of the Assem- 
bly during the 44th session of the Legis- 
lature of the State of California, 1921. 
1921. 2832 p. 

Journal of the Senate during 



the 44th session of the Legislature of the 
State of California, 1921. 1921. 2627 p. 

Appendix to the journals of the 



Senate and Assembly of the 44th session 
of the Legislature of the State of Cali- 
fornia. 1921. 5 vols. 

Library, State. Apportionment of 
members of state legislatures. 1922. 14 
p. map. 

News Notes of California Li- 



braries, vol. 16, no. 1, January, 1922. 
141 p. 

Mining Bureau. (San Francisco). 
Bulletin, no. 89. Petroleum resources of 
California, with special reference to un- 
proved areas. 1921. 186 p. maps, illus. 

— ■ — — Monthly chapter of report 



XVIII of the state Mineralogist cover- 
ing mining in California and the activi- 
ties of the state of California, vol. 18, 
nos. 1-2, January-February, 1922. maps, 
illus. 

Cover title, Mining in California. 

Preliminary report no. 8. A 



review of mining in California during 
1921, with notes on the outlook for 1922. 
January, 1922. 6S p. map. 

Summary of operations Cali- 



fornia oil fields, vol. 7, nos. 5-7, Novem- 
ber-December, 1921, January, 1922. illus. 

Motor Vehicles, Department of. 
Cuts of approved manufactured and home- 
made headlight devices for guidance of 
enforcing officials. 1922. 114 p. illus. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



237 



Prison, State (San Quentin). The 
bulletin, vol. 9, nos. 4-6, January-March, 
1922. 

A monthly journal devoted to in- 
mate welfare. 

Public Instruction, Superinten- 
dent of. Bulletin no. 6. A forest fire 
prevention manual for the school children 
of California. 1922. 31 p. illus. 

Railroad Commission (San Fran- 
cisco). Regulation of public utilities — 
review of the history of regulation and 
the methods adopted by the commission. 
1922. 11 p. 

Real Estate Department. Califor- 
nia real estate directory-bulletin, vol. 3, 
no. 1, February, 1922. 384 p. 
Price $1.00 per annum. 

Secretary of State. Partial list of 
amendments to constitution and proposed 
statutes to be submitted to the electors 
at the general election, Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 7, 1922. 1922. 68 p. 

Surveyor General. Rules and regu- 
lations concerning oil and gas permits 
and leases (including penalties and re- 
strictions and also permits and leases to 
develop other minerals). 1922. 32 p. 

State Teachers College, San Fran- 
cisco. Preliminary announcement of the 
summer session, June 26, to August 4, 
1922. 1922. 47 p. 12°. 

University of California (Berke- 
ley). Bulletin, third series, vol. 15, no. 
5. Summer session. Los Angeles, July 1, 
to August 12, 1922. Berkeley, November, 
1921. 94 p. illus. 12°. 

Same, vol. 15, no. 6. Register 



1920-1921, with announcements foi 
1921-22, in two volumes. Berkeley, De- 
cember, 1921. 

Same, vol. 15, no. 7. Interses- 



sion, May 15, to June 24 and summer 
session, June 26, to August 5, 1922. 
Berkeley, January, 1922. 174 p. 12°. 



Calendar, vol. LYI, nos. 1-12, 

January 7, to March 25, 1922. 8 p. 

folders. 

A weekly bulletin of official Uni- 
versity announcements. Price 25 
cents a half-year, postpaid. 

Chronicle: vol. XXIV, no. 1, 



January, 1922. p. 1-127. illus. roy. S° 

Contents: The Washington confer- 
ence, Chester H. Rowell ; The isola- 
tion plan, David Starr Jordan ; The 
new marinism, Paull Franklin Baum ; 
An apology for Athens, George Mil- 
ler Calhoun ; Handsome and Theo- 
dore, Arthur W. Ryder ; Omens, Anne 
Goodwin Winslow ; The labor con- 
troversy of 1921, Stuart Daggett; 
The labors of the British archangels, 
Harold Bruce; November 11, 1918, 
A. C. L. ; Victorian poetry of social 
unrest, Stanley T. Williams ; To 
South Fork Canyon, Jack Lyman; 
The birds of the Berkeley campus, 
Amelia Sanford Mien ; Songs from 
the lyric road, Ruth Harwood ; 
Phrontistery. 

Price per year $2.00 ; single copies 
50 cents. 

Publications. Agricultural Sci- 



ences, vol. 4, no. 10. Equilibrium studies 
with certain acids and minerals and their 
probable relation to the decomposition 
of minerals by bacteria, by Douglas 
Wright, Jr. Berkeley, March 22, 1922. 
p. 245-337. 35 text figs, roy 8°. 
Price $2.00. 

College of Agriculture. 

Report of the College of Agriculture and 
the Agricultural Experiment Station of 
the University of California, July 1, 
1920, to June 30, 1921. Berkeley, 1922. 
19S p. illus. 



Astronomy. Lick Ob- 
servatory bulletin no. 336. On the re 
lation between parallax, proper motion, 
and apparent magnitude. Berkeley, 
March 31, 1922. p. 135-140. 4°. 

Price $2.50 per vol. in advance. 
Vol. 10 current. 

History, vol. 7. The 



North West Company, by Gordon 
Charles Davidson. Berkeley, 1918. 349 p. 

maps, roy 8°. 

Price $3.00. 



238 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Same, vol. 8. Cata- 
logue of materials in the Archivo Gen- 
eral de Indias for the history of the 
Pacific Coast and the American south- 
west, by Charles E. Chapman. Berkeley, 
1919. 755 p. roy 8°. 
Price $5.50. 

Modern Philology, vol. 



11. The Charles Mills Gayley anniver- 
sary papers, contributed by former stud- 
ents of Professor Gayley and by mem- 
bers of his department and presented to 
him in celebration of his thirtieth year 
of distinguished service in the University 
of California, 1S89-1919. Berkeley, 
1922, vi. 292 p. roy 8°. 
Price $3.00. 

— ■ Zoology, vol. 20, no. 8. 



Mitosis and fission in the active and en- 
cysted phases of giardia enterica (Grassi) 
of man, with a discussion of the method 
of origin of bilateral symmetry in tho 
polyma-stigote flagellates, by Charles A. 
Kofoid and Olive Swezy. Berkeley, 
March 7, 1922. p. 199-234. 11 text figs, 
roy 8° . 

Price 10 cents. 

Veterans' Home. Annual report of 
Board of Directors and officers, fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1921. 1922. 59 p. 
illus. 

Whittier State School. Journal of 
delinquency, vol. 6 : no. G, November, 
1921. p. 529-605. 4°. 

Same, Title-page and contents, 

vol. G, 1921. [4 p.] 4°. 



The Sentinel (new series), 

vol. 18, nos. 6-11, January-March, 1922. 

Published bi-weekly by the Whit- 
tier State School. 

Price $1.00 per year ; 2 cents per 
copy. 



CALIFORNIA CITY PUBLICATIONS 
RECEIVED DURING JANUARY, 
FEBRUARY AND MARCH, 1922. 

Alameda. City council. Alameda mu- 
nicipal quarterly, vol. 1, no. 12, March, 
1922. 

Berkeley. Public library. Bulletin, 
vol. 6, nos. 1-2, January-February, 1922. 



Los Angeles. Chamber of commerce. 
Southern California business, no. 1, 
February, 1922. 

Richmond. Health department. 
Monthly report, January-March, 1922. 

Public library. Bulletin, vol. 



8, no. 7, January, 1922, 

Sacramento. Health department. 
Statement of vital statistics for the 
months of December, 1921, January- 
February, 1922. 

San Diego. Health department. 
Monthly report, November - December, 
1921, January-February, 1922. 

San Francisco. Board of supervis- 
ors. Journal of proceedings, vol. 16, no. 
52, December, 1921, vol. 17, nos. 1-8, 
January-February, 1922. 

Municipal record, vol. 15, nos. 



1-13, January-March, 1922. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND ADDED 
DURING OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, 
DECEMBER, JANUARY, FEBRU- 
ARY AND MARCH. 

In American Braille. 

Books marked c are printed with 
contractions. 

BOOKS. 

Allen, Joseph Henry. Lessons to 
accompany Allen's Latin primer. 

Tables in Allen's Latin primer. 



cBible. New Testament. Vols. 3, 4, 5. 

Contents; Vol. 3, Acts-Romans. 
Vol. 4, I Corinthians — Titus. Vol. 5, 
Philemon-Revelation. 

Gift of Hermann Alber. 

Emery, M. S. Every-day business. 

Contents: Letter writing; Bills, re- 
ceipts and accounts ; Post-office busi- 
ness ; Telegrams ; Express business ; 
United States money ; Savings 
banks ; National banks ; Bank 
checks ; Notes and drafts ; Mortga- 
ges ; Investment and speculation ; 
Taxes ; Fire - insurance ; Life - insur- 
ance. 

cPearson, Henry Carr. Essentials of 
Latin for beginners. 6 vols. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



239 



MAGAZINES. 

cCatholic review for October, Novem- 
ber and December. 

Beginning with the January, 1922 
number, this magazine is published 
in Revised Braille. 

cChristian record for October, Novem- 
ber, December, January and February. 

cThe illuminator for September and 
December. 

cRed and white for January. 

Searchlight for December.. 

MUSIC. 
PIANO. 

*Beethoven, Ludwig von. Sonata 
patbetique, op. 13. 
Duplicate copy. 

*Bendel, Franz. Am Genfer See, op. 
139, no. 4. — Cascade du Cbandron. 

Brahms, Johannes. Rhapsody, op. 79, 
no. 1. 

Gift of C. W. Bailey. 

* Chopin, Fryderyk Franciszek. Pre- 
ludes, op. 28, nos. 1-24. 
Duplicate copy. 
*Haberbier, Ernst. Magic bells. 

*Hofmaister, Leipzig. Reminiscences, 
op. 19. — Lucia di Lammermoor, fan- 
taisie dramatique. 

*Lavallee, Oalixa. The butterfly (Le 
papillon). (4) 

Duplicate copy. 

*MacDowell, Edward Alexander. Tbe 
eagle, op. 32, no. 1. 

*Rheinberger, Joseph. The chase. 
Duplicate copy. 

Rubinstein, Anton Gregorovitch. 
Etude, op. 23, no. 2. 

Gift of C. W. Bailey. 

Etude, op. 23, no. 3. 

Gift of C. W. Bailey. 

Etude, op. 23, no. 4. 

Gift of C. W. Bailey. 

*Sauer, Emile. Echo de Vienne, valse 
de concert. 



*Schulhoff, J. Grand valse brillante, 
op. G. no. 1. 

* Second or Alboni valse brillante. 



* Schumann, Robert Alexander. Con- 
cert opus 54. 

* Novellette, op. 99, no. 9. 



Duplicate copy. 

*Seeling, Hans. Lurline — Loreley, op. 
2. 

Sidus, Carl. Faust, grande valse de 
concert. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of C. W. 
Pettis. 

*Wagner, Richard. O, thou beautiful 
evening star — romance from Tannhaus- 
er ; arranged by Franz Liszt. 
Duplicate copy. 

* Weber, Carl Marie von. P o 1 a c c a 
brillante, op. 72. 

*Wehli, J. M. Home, sweet home.. 
(For the left hand only.) 

*Wollenhaupt, Heinrich Adolf. 
Grande valse de concert, op. 19. 

In European Braille. 

books. 

Anecdotes of dogs. 
In grade 1. 

Bennett, Enoch Arnold. From the log 

of the Velsea. 

Contents: Holland; The Baltic; 
Copenhagen ; On the French and 
Flemish coasts ; East Anglian estu- 
aries. 

Bessell, J. Perctval. Paid out. 3 vol. 

Book of simple contractions. 

Brighurst, Frank G. Notes on the 

theory of massage. 

Mr Brighurst is instructor in mas- 
sage at the National Institute for the 
Blind, London. 

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. 5 vols. 

Bungey, E. Newton. The parson's 
pigs. 

Caine, Thomas Henry Hall. The gen- 
erosity of Magda. 



"Gift of C. L. Poulsen. 
7—18268 



240 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Couch, Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-. 

The splendid spur. 2 vols. 

The adventures of Mr John Marvel, 
a servant of his late majesty King 
Charles I in the years 1642-3. 

A dictionary of difficult words. 

Selected from civil service and 
other examination papers. 

Fabee, Jean Henri Casimir. Social life 
in the insect world. 3 vols. 

Deals with some of the more 
familiar and interesting- insects, en- 
larging upon their habits and their 
romances. — Bk. rev. digest. 

Freeman, W. Austin, The bronze par- 
rot and The missing mortgagee. 

Two detective stories. 
In grade 1. 

French Braille, alphabet and rules for 
abbreviated writing. 

George, Florence A. Household notes, 
being recipes, notes and rules extracted 
from King Edward's cookery book. 

Grimshaw, Beatrice. The terrible 

island. 2 vols. 

Experiences of treasure seekers on 
an island on which blindness usually 
comes to those who remain there 
long. 

Haggard, Sir Henry Rider. Mr Mee- 

son's will. 2 vols. 

The strange story of a will that 
is tattooed on a woman's back. 

Hardy, Thomas. What the shepherds 
saw. 

"A tale of four moonlight nights." 

Hill, Rev St. Clare. Teachers of the 

blind, their training, qualifications and 

reasonable prospects of employment. 

The subject from an English point 
of view. 

Hoblyn, Richard Dennis. Hoblyn's 
dictionary of medical terms. 3 vols. 

Abridged for the use of blind 
students of massage, Swedish reme- 
dial exercises and electricity, by J. 
Lloyd Johnstone. 

Hockin, Olive. Two girls on the land. 
2 vols. 

War-time on a Dartmoor farm. 

How to write arithmetic and algebra by 
means of raised type. 

Italian Braille code. 



Jacobs, William Wymark. The brown 
man's servant. 

Kipling, Rudyard. "Brugglesmith." 

Humorous account of the getting 
home of a man "half seas over." 

The disturber of traffic. 



His private honour. 

A story of English soldiers in 
India. 

■ The seven seas and Barrack-room 



ballads. 

Contents: A song of the English; 
The first Chantey ; The last Chantey ; 
The merchantmen ; M ' Andrews 
hymn ; The miracles ; The native- 
born ; The king ; The rhyme of the 
•three sealers ; The derelict ; The 
answer ; The song of the banjo ; The 
liner she's a lady ; Mulholland's con- 
tract ; Anchor song ; The lost legion ; 
The sea-wife ; Hymn before action ; 
To the true romance ; The flowers ; 
The last rhyme of true Thomas ; In 
the Neolithic age; The story of Ung; 
The three - decker ; An American ; 
The Mary Gloster ; The Sestina of 
the Tramp-royal ; Barrack-room bal- 
lads : "Back to the army again"; 
"Birds of prey" march ; "Soldier an' 
sailor too" ; Sappers ; That day ; 
"The men that fought at Minden" ; 
Cholera Camp ; The ladies ; Bill 'Aw- 
kins ; The mother-lodge ; "Follow 
me 'ome"; The sergeant's weddin'; 
The jacket ; The 'eathen ; The shut- 
eye sentry; "Mary pity women!"; 
For to admire ; L'envoi. 

London, Jack. The call of the wild. 

A wonderful autobiography of a 
dog. A graphic picture of wild life 
in the Klondyke. 

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. The 
village blacksmith and The psalm of 
life. 

In grade 1. 

Marryat, Frederick. Mr Midshipman 

Easy. 4 vols. 

Full of thrilling episodes, rich in 
salt-water character. — Baker. 

Maxwell, Sir Herbert Eustace. Sixty 

years a queen. 4 vols. 

The story of Queen "Victoria's 
reign. 

Meredith, George. The egoist. 6 vols. 

The finest example of Meredith's 
realism and analytical power. — Baker. 

Militz, Mrs Annie Rix. Primary les- 

' sons in Christian living and healing. 

2 vols. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of the Master 
Mind Publishing Co. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



241 



Muller, Jorgen Peter. My system. 

Fifteen minutes work a day for 
health's sake. 

The 1920 knitting and crochet book. 

Contains patterns for baby's caps, 
jackets, bootees, men's socks, wom- 
en's stockings, vests, sweaters, etc. 

Osgood, Mrs Irene. Where Pharaoh 
dreams. 

The impression of a woman of 
moods in Egypt. 

Qstrtjm, Kurre W. Massage and the 
original Swedish movements. 

Packard, Frank L. From now on. 3 
vols. 

The thief, after his long- term in 
prison, his hairbreadth escapes from 
other thieves, decides to live straight 
"from now on." 

The poplar field and other poems. 
In grade 1. 

Contents: The poplar field, by Cow- 
per ; To sleep, by Wordsworth ; The 
reverie of poor Susan, by Words- 
worth ; The soldier's dream, by 
Campbell. 

Reade, Charles. Foul play. 4 vols. 

A merchant wrecks one of his 
own ships for the insurance money. 
The hero and heroine are both on 
the ship and are cast on a desert 
island. 

Roche, Arthur Somers. Plunder. 2 

vols. 

An agreement worth millions to 
those signing it is lost. They are 
unscrupulous in their hunt for it. 

The St. Dunstan's hymn book. 

Contents: Abide with me; Art thou 
weary ; Christian, seek not yet ; Eter- 
nal Father ; Fight the good fight ; 
Glory to thee, my God ; -God moves ; 
God save the king ; Holy, holy, 
holy ! ; How sweet the name ; I heard 
the voice ; Jerusalem, my happy ; 
Just as I am ; Jesus, lover of my 
soul ; Jesus lives ; Lead kindly light ; 
Nearer my God to Thee ; O God, our 
help ; Oft in danger ; Onward, Christ- 
ian soldiers ; Peace, perfect peace ; 
Rock of ages ; Stand up, stand up 
for Jesus; Sun of my soul: The king 
of love ; There is a green hill ; Thine 
forever ; Through all the changing ; 
Through the night of doubt ; When I 
survey. 

Selected readings in grade 2, for adults. 
Contents: Pilgrims; The missions 
in a yillage; Work and welcome; 
How we captured a general ; The 
friend, a hospital incident ; His run- 
ners; The wooing of a "nightingale"; 
The animal no man can capture ; 
The barber of Bagdad ; The story of 
common salt ; Newspapers ; Viscount 
Horatio Nelson ; From the sonnets of 
John Milton : A sonnet on his own 
blindness ; Execution of Montrose, 
Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon ; 
Extract from the Plague of London. 



Somerville, Edith Oenone, c6 Mar- 
tin, Violet ("Martin Ross," pseud.). 
Philippa's fox-hunt. 
An Irish fox-hunt. 

The silver fox. 



A story in which Irish superstition 
plays a big part. 

Spelling book for junior classes. 2 
vols. 

Stacpoole, Henky De Vere. The ship 
of coral. 3 vols. 

Treasure-seeking, piracy, smug- 
gling, and marooning in the Carib- 
bean Seas, and idyllic love romanc- 
ing, with picturesque description of 
tropical scenery. — Baker. 



F. 



Collins. Gardening 



Stainsby, 
notes. 

Reprinted from Progress, specially 
written for the benefit of the blind. 

Street, George Slythe. The ghosts of 
Piccadilly. 2 vols. 

Delightful, gossippy anecdotes 
about people and houses that used to 
be in and around Piccadilly, London. 

Thayer, William Roscoe. Theodore 
Roosevelt, an intimate biography. 4 
vols. 

"Valentine, Douglas," pseud. See 
Williams, Valentine. 

Wallace, Edgar. The fourth plague. 
2 vols. 

An exciting adventure story. 

Wilberforce, Basil. Thoughts for 
Christmas. 

Williams, Valentine ("Douglas Val- 
entine," pseud.). 

The man with the club foot. 2 vols. 
Thrilling story of the adventures 
of secret service agents in Germany. 

MAGAZINES. 

Braille mail for October, November, 
December, January, February and 

March. 

Braille musical magatine for Septem- 
ber, October, November, December, 
January and February. 

Hampstead for September, October, 
November, December, January and 
February. 

Hora jucunda for October, November, 
December, January, February and 
March. 



242 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



The lightbringer for December-Febru- 
ary and Marcb-May. 

The literary journal for October, No- 
vember, December, January, February 
and March. 

Morning for September, October, No- 
vember, December, January and Feb- 
ruary. 

Nuggets for October, November, Decem- 
ber, January, February and Marcb. 

Progress for October, November, De- 
cember, January, February and March. 

Santa Lucia for October, November, De- 
cember. January, February and March. 

MUSIC. 

Braille musical magazine for Septem- 
ber, October, November, December, 
January and February. 

Hadow. William Henry. Studies in 
modern music. First series. 3 vols. 
Contents: Hector Berlioz; Robert 
Schumann ; Richard Wagner. 

Studies in modern music. Second 



series. 3 vols. 

Contents: Frederick Chopin ; An- 
tonian Dvorak ; Johannes Brahms. 

In Moon Type. 
BOOKS. 

Andrews, Mrs Mary Raymond (Ship- 
man). The three things. 

Phillip finds three things through 
the war — love, equality of men, and 
God. 

Baker, Ray Stannard ("David Gray- 
son," psfiud.). The friendly road. 4 
vols. 

The David Grayson of the Adven- 
tures in contentment and friendship 
takes to the open road. 

Barclay, Mrs Florence Louisa 
( Charlesworth ) . The mistress of 
Shenstone. 4 vols. 

A wholly delightful love story. — 
Bk. rev. digest. 

Bayly. Ada Ellen, ("Edna Lyall," 

pseud.) In the golden days. 6 vols. 

English life in the Seventeenth cen- 
tury. 

Bennett, Enoch Arnold. From the log 
of the Velsea. 3 vols. 

Delightful accounts of the author's 
wanderings in his own yacht. 

For contents see English Braille 
copy. 



Besant, Sir Walter, & Rice, James. 
The golden butterfly. 11 vols. 

How an American oil-king dis- 
penses his millions. — Baker. 

Bible. Reading cards (in French), nos. 
1-6. 

Old Testament. Psalms (in 



French). 3 vols. 
Psalms 34 and 86 (in 



German ) . 



Psalms 90, 91 and 103 



(in German). 



— ; — New Testament. John (in 
French). 2 vols. 

• John, chapter 3 (in 



French). 



French). 



German). 



John, chapter 14 (in 



John, chapter 14 (in 



Sermon on the Mount 



(in Japanese). 

Bryant, Marguerite. Christopher Hib- 
bault, roadmaker. 7 vols. 

The boy is taken from the work- 
house and raised by a cripple. His 
only ideal is to make the world a 
better place to live in. He finds he 
must use the great wealth left him 
to keep faith with his ideal. 

Buchanan, Robert Williams. God and 
the man. 7 vols. 

Romance, showing the vanity and 
folly of hate. — Baker. 

Carey, Rosa Nouchette. Wee wine. 
9 vols. 

An English love story. 

Cresswell, Clarice M. Pilate gave 
sentence. 6 vols. 

Croker, Mrs Bithia Mary (Shefpard). 
Miss Balmaine's past. 6 vols. 

Cullum, Ridgewell. The brooding 
wild. 4 vols. 

A mountain tragedy. 

Dell, Ethel May. The tidal wave and 

other stories. 5 vols. 

Contents: Vol. 1, The tidal wave. 
Vol. 2, The tidal wave, cont. ; The 
magic circle. Vol. 3, The looker on ; 
The second fiddle. Vol. 4, The wom- 
an of his dreams. Vol. 5. The return 
game. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



243 



Gibbon, Pekceval. The adventures of 
Miss Gregory. 5 vols. 

A series of short stories, the ad- 
ventures of Miss Gregory, a fearless 
Englishwoman, on her travels in 
many remote parts of the world. 

"Grayson, David," pseud. See Bakek, 
Ray Stannard. 

Hagedorn, Hermann. Theodore Roose- 
velt, a biographical sketch. 

Harland, Henry. The cardinal's snuff 
box. 4 vols. 

The story of a courtship taking 
place in the late summer near an 
Italian lake. 

Harte, Francis Bret. Brown of Cala- 
veras, etc. 

Contains also.- A boy's dog; Side- 
walkings ; The right eye of the Com- 
mander ; The Iliad of Sandy Bar. 

The luck of Roaring Camp and 



Notes by flood and field. 

M'liss. 

Contains also; High water mark. 

The outcasts of Poker Flat. 

Contains also ; Miggles ; Tennes- 
see's partner. 

— ' — A passage in the life of Mr John 



A 



Oakhurst. 

Contains also; How Santa Claus 
came to Simpson's Bar. 

■ — The rose of Tuolumne. 

Contains also; Jinny; With the en- 
trees. 

The twins of Table Mountain. 

King, William Benjamin Basil. The 
wild olive. 6 vols. 

An absorbing tale of love and ad- 
venture. — Bk. rev. digest. 

V^KlPLING, RUDYARD, & BALESTIER, WOL- 

cott. The Naulahka. 6 vols. 

A California speculator follows his 
love, a medical missionary, to India, 
amuses the Rajah, and has many ad- 
ventures. — Baker. 

Lamb, Charles cC- Mary. Tales from 
Shakespeare. 7 vols. 

Contents; Vol. 1, The tempest; A 
midsummer night's dream ; The win- 
ter's tale. Vol. 2, Much ado about 
nothing ; As you like it ; The two 
gentlemen of Verona. Vol. 3, The 
merchant of Venice ; Cymbeline ; 
King Lear. Vol. 4, Macbeth ; All's 
well that ends well ; The taming of 
the shrew. Vol. 5, The comedy of 
errors ; Measure for measure ; 
Twelfth night. Vol. 6, Timon of 
Athens ; Romeo and Juliet ; Hamlet. 
Vol. 7, Othello ; Pericles, Prince of 
Tyre. 



"Lyall, Edna," pseud. See Bayly, Ada 
Ellen. 

"Maartens, Maarten," pseud. See 
Schwartz, Joztja Marius Willem. . 

Marryat, Frederick. The children of 
the New Forest. 7 vols. 

Children, whose parents are killed 
and their home burned down by 
Cromwell's army, live an idyllic life 
in a forester's hut in the forest. 

Mason, Alfred Edward Woodley. The 
four feathers. 7 vols. 

Pour white feathers were given 
him as a symbol of his cowardice. 
This is the story of how he redeemed 
them. 

Oppenheim, Edward Phillips. The 

great impersonation. 5 vols. 

Two men who look alike, one a 
drunken Englishman, the other a 
typical German officer, are the prin- 
cipal characters of this story. Eng- 
land in wartime is the setting. 

Orczy, Emma, baroness. I will repay. 
4 vols. 

Romance in France during the 
days of the guillotine. 

Roosevelt, Theodore. Letters to his 
children ; edited by John Bucklin 
Bishop. 3 vols. 

Schwartz, Joztja Marius Willem 
("Maarten Maartens," pseud.). The sin 
of Joost Avelingh. 7 vols. 

Painting of homely Dutch life. 
The plot pivots on a murder. — Baker. 

Short quotations for adult beginners — 
new series. 

Stevenson, Robert Louis. New Ara- 
bian nights. 7 vols. 

Contents; Vols. 1 and 2, The sui- 
cide club. Vols. 3 and 4, The Rajah's 
diamond. Vols. 5 and 6, The pavilion 
on the links ; A lodging for the night. 
Vol. 7, The Sire de Maletroit's door ; 
Providence and the guitar. 

White, Stewart Edward. The cabin. 
4 vols. 

Chronicle of the building of a 
cabin home in a sugar pine-girdled 
meadow of the Sierras. — Bk. rev. 
digest. 

Wilson, Augusta Jane Evans. St. 
Elmo. 12 vols. 



MAGAZINES. 

Dawn, a quarterly magazine, parts 141 
and 142. 



244 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



Moon magazine for October, November 
and December. 

In New York Point. 

BOOKS. 

Ely, Richard Theodore. Economics. 
2 vols. 

In Alaska. 

Contents ; Our one American 
castle ; Sitka and its inhabitants ; 
Indian canoe-building ; At a salmon 
pool ; The loneliest place in the United 
States ; Alaska Eskimo houses ; Rein- 
deer for Alaska ; On the Yukon ; Vol- 
cania ; The hermits of western Alas- 
ka ; Seal islands of Alaska ; Sea- 
lions ; Hunting the sea-otter. 

Montgomery, David Henry. Leading 
facts of French history. 2 vols. 

magazines. 
Catholic transcript for October, No- 
vember, December, January, February 
and March. 

Christian record for October, Novem- 
ber, December, January, February and 
March. 

Gospel trumpet for October, November, 
December and February. 

Lux vera, Catholic monthly, for October, 
November, December, January, Febru- 
ary and March. 

Matilda Ziegler magazine for October, 
November, December, January, Febru- 
ary and March. 

Sunday school monthly for October, 
November, December, January, Febru- 
ary and March. 

Weekly review for October, November. 
December, January, February and 
March. 

In Revised Braille, Grade 1*. 

Books marked c are printed with 
contractions. 



BOOKS. 

cAlcott, Louisa May. 
girl. 3 vols. 



Ad old fashion - 



The coming of a country girl to a 
fashionable Boston family, their fail- 
ure, and her goodness and self-sacri- 
fice. — Baker. 



cAndrews, Jane. The seven little sis- 
ters. 

Stories of seven little girls living 
in different parts of the world. 

cAtkey, Bertram. Winnie and the 
Rajah. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

Winnie O'Wynn and the dark 

horses. 

Two more Winnie stories. 
Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland. California. 

cBacheller, Irving. A man for the 

ages. Vols. 5 and 6. 

Vols. 1, 2, 3 and 4 added previously. 
Gift of the American Brotherhood 
of Free Reading for the Blind. 

cBergold, Lilian Clara. Abraham Lin- 
coln centennial. 

A collection of authentic stories, 
with poems, songs and programs for 
the boys, girls and teachers of ele- 
mentary schools. 

cBible. New Testament. Acts, Romans 

and Corinthians (St. James version). 

Gift of the Universal Braille Press. 

cBigham, Madge A. Stories of Mother 
Goose village. 

Burrowes, Annesley. What it is like 
to be blind. 

An article that was printed in the 
Saturday evening post, March 13, 
1920. 

cColonial stories retold from St. Nicho- 
las. 

Contents.- Ma-Ta-Osa of Pow-Ha- 
Tan, by E. S. Brooks ; How the Pil- 
grims came to Plymouth, by Azel 
Ames ; Little Susan Boudinot, by 
Ethel Parton ; The first Christmas 
tree in New England, by Sarah J. 
Pritchard ; The fight for a language, 
by E. S. Brooks ; Old Dutch times in 
New York, by T. W. Higginson ; An 
early American rebellion, by F. N. 
Doubleday ; My grandmother's grand- 
mother's Christmas candle, by Heze- 
kiah Butterworth ; Little Puritans, 
by H. E. Scudder ; A new leaf from 
Washington's boy life, by W. F. 
Carne ; The Stamp-act box. by D. 
W. Woods. 

cDltoe, Daniel. Robinson Crusoe. 4 
vols. 

cDickens, Charles. A Christmas carol. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



245 



cDuChailltj, Paul Belloni. Wild life 
under the equator. 2 vols. 

Chapters on Monkey Island, Hunt- 
ing elephants and buffaloes, An 
African fireside, A great gorilla, A 
tornado, Curious African birds, etc. 

cEggleston, Edward. Stories of Ameri- 
can life and adventure. 2 vols. 

Contents: Vol. 1, A white boy 
among the Indians ; The making of a 
canoe ; Some things about Indian 
corn ; Some women in the Indian 
wars ; The coming of tea and coffee ; 
Kidnapped boys ; The last battle of 
Blackbeard ; An old Philadelphia 
school ; A Dutch family in the Revo- 
lution ; A school of long ago ; Stories 
of whaling ; A whaling song ; A 
strange escape ; Grandmother Bear ; 
The great turtle ; The rattlesnake 
god ; Witchcraft in Louisiana ; A 
story of Niagara ; Among the alliga- 
tors ; Jasper ; Song of Marion's men. 
Vol. 2, A brave girl ; A prisoner 
among the Indians; Hungry times in 
the woods ; S c o u w a becomes a 
white man again ; A baby lost in the 
woods ; Elizabeth Zane ; The river 
pirates ; Old - fashioned telegraphs ; 
A boy's foolish adventure ; A foot 
race for life ; Loretto and his wife ; 
A Blackfoot story ; How Fremont 
crossed the mountains ; Finding gold 
in California ; Descending the Grand 
Canyon ; The-man-that-draws-the- 
handcart ; The lazy, lucky Indian ; 
Peter Petersen ; The greatest of tele- 
scope makers ; Adventures in Alaska. 

cFisher, Mrs Dorothea Frances (Can- 
field). Understood Betsy. 4 vols. 

Betsy, too particularly brought up 
and too carefully cared for, finds 
herself on a Vermont farm with no 
one in particular to look out for her. 

cFitzgerald, Frances Scott Key. The 
camel's back. 

Humorous story of a masquerade 
and a wedding. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cGreene, Homer. The flag. 2 vols. 

A wholesome story of military pa- 
triotism. — Bk. rev. digest. 

Griffith, Eleanor Glendower. Cho 
Cho and the health fairy. 

Six stories published by the Child 
Health Organization of America. 

cGuest, Edgar Allen. Poems from the 
Path to home. 2 vols. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 



cHale, Edward Everett. 
without a country. 



The man 



Duplicate copy. Other copy hand 
copied. 



cHabberton, John. Helen's babies. 2 

vols. 

Humorous account of the few days 
a bachelor uncle spends in charge of 
his two small nephews while their 
parents are away. 

cHawkes, Clarence. Field and forest 
friends. 

Contents: The trail to wooqo and 
water ; A tale from the skidway ; 
How the porcupine got his quills ; 
The story of Willow Brook ; A little 
dapple fool ; The family of Bob- 
White ; The busy bee ; Down stream 
in a canoe ; Jacking and moose cal- 
ling ; In beaverland. 

Shaggycoat, the biography of a 

beaver. 

cIrving, Washington. The legend of 

Sleepy Hollow. 

cIrwin, Wallace Admah. The life of 

Jeremiah Bartless. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cJacques, John Godfrey. Escape from 
Siberian exile. Vol. 1. 

Description of Russian cruelty to 
prisoners. 

Hand copied. Gift of Mrs Florence 
Livingston. 

cJudd, Mary Catherine. Wigwam sto- 
ries told by North American Indians. 
2 vols. 

cLewis, Margaret (Cameron). Com- 
pany dinner. 

Includes also: The white elephant,' 
by Jessie Leach Rector. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

The great god Pan and Little 



white hin. 

The first is the story of an inex- 
perienced girl and a business deal; 
the second of a famous woman novel- 
ist, mistaken for an Irish maid, and 
kidnapped to cook a dinner given in 
her honor. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cKimball, Edward Ancel. Answers to 
questions concerning Christian Science. 
Contains also.- Christian Science, 
its compassionate appeal. 

Gift of the Christian Science Pub- 
lishing Co. 

cKipling, Rudyard. The brushwood boy. 
One of the most beautiful of love 
stories. 



246 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [ April, 1922 



cLa Motte, Ellen N. 
2 vols. 



Peking dust. 



Letters from Peking in the years 
1916 and 1917. 

cLetjpp, Francis Ellington. The man 
Roosevelt. 3 vols. 

cLincoln, Joseph Crosby. "Shavings." 

4 vols. 

"Shaving-s" is a quaint figure in 
the Cape Cod town. He makes wind- 
mills for pleasure and is a rare influ- 
ence for good with his quiet, quick 
wit. 

cA little book of guessing games. 

cLodge, Henry Cabot. Hero tales from 
American history. 2 vols. 

Contents: "Vol. 1, George Washing- 
ton ; Daniel Boone and the founda- 
tion of Kentucky ; George Rogers 
Clark and the conquest of the North- 
west ; The battle of Trenton ; Ben- 
nington ; King's Mountain ; The 
storming of Stony Point ; Gouver- 
neur Morris ; The burning of the 
"Philadelphia" ; The cruise of the 
"Wasp" ; The "General Armstrong" 
privateer ; The battle of New Or- 
leans ; John Quincy Adams and the 
right of petition ; Francis Parkman. 
Vol. 2, Remember the Alamo ; Hamp- 
ton Roads ; The flag-bearer ; The 
death of Stonewall Jackson ; The 
charge at Gettysburg ; General Grant 
and the Vicksburg campaign ; Rob- 
ert Gould Shaw ; Charles Russell 
Lowell ; Sheridan at Cedar Creek ; 
Lieutenant Cushing and the ram 
"Albemarle" ; Farragut at Mobile 
Bay ; Abraham Lincoln. 

cMarquand, John Philip. The right 
that failed. 2 vols. 

A pugilist sails under false colors 
at a fashionable hotel. The right 
that fails is his strong right fist. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cMarsh, George. McLeod's partner. 
A dog story. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cPark, John Edgar. Our Christmas 
criminal. 

Includes also: "Nary Christmas," 
by Ruth Comfort Mitchell. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cPelley, William Dudley. The face 
in the window. 

Includes also: No flowers, by Gor- 
don Arthur Smith. 

The face in the window : A woman 
captures the escaped convict. No 
flowers : An American sailor officiates 
at the funeral of a French apache. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 



cPorter, Sydney ("O. Henry," pseud.). 

Romance of a busy broker. 

Duplicate copy. Gift of G. Clay- 
brooke. 

cReeve, Arthur Benjamin. The ra- 
dium robber and The smuggler. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cRiggs, Mrs Kate Douglas (Smith) 
Wiggin. The Bird's Christmas carol. 

cRinehart, Mrs Mary (Roberts). 
Mind over motor. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

c The simple lifers (a Tish story). 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cSharp, Dallas Lore. Beyond the pas- 
ture bars. 

Contents: Beyond the pasture 
bars ; The crazy flicker ; The wild 
geese ; The wood pussy ; A house of 
many doors ; Wild life in the farm- 
yard ; A song of the winter woods ; 
On the possum's trail ; The dance in 
the alder swale ; Chickaree, the 
scold ; A lesson in natural history ; 
Calico and the kittens ; Suggestions 
to teachers and pupils. 

cSiefert, Shirley L, The sweetest of 
memories. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cTarr, Ralph Stockman, & McMurry, 
Frank Morton. World geography, 
first book. 4 vols. 

cTaylor, Bayaed. Boys of other coun- 
tries. 2 vols. 

Contents.- Vol. 1, The little post 
boy ; The Pasha's son ; Jan of Ice- 
land. Vol. 2, The two herd-boys ; 
The young serf ; Studies of animal 
nature ; A robber region of Southern 
California. 

cTerhune, Albert Payson. Dog stor- 
ies, vols. 8 and 9. 

Contents: Vol. 8, Coming of Lad; 
Not guilty. Vol. 9, No trespassing ; 
Hero stuff. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

cTilden, Freeman. Crabtree and the 
blue beaks and Crabtree cuts a melon. 
Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

Crabtree baits a hook and Crab- 



tree jams the wireless. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 



vol. 17, no. 2] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



247 



cTrain, Arthur Cheyney. In witness 

whereof. 

Duplicate copy. 

Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

c Verne, Jules. Twenty thousand 
leagues under the sea. 4 vols. 

The wondrous voyages, piracies 
and disasters of a submarine ship. — 
Baker. 

cWeston, George. The fat angel. 
The fat angel is Cupid. 
Hand copied by and gift of Women 
Volunteers of Oakland, California. 

MAGAZINES. 

cThe bkaille courier for October, No- 
vember, December, January, February 
and March. 

cCatholic review for January, Febru- 
ary and March. 

cGospel trumpet for May, June, July, 
September, October, November, Decem- 
ber and February. 



cMatilda Ziegler magazine for October, 
November, December, January, Febru- 
ary and March. 

Messenger to the sightless for October, 
November, December, January, Febru- 
ary and March. 

In Ink Print. 

MAGAZINES. 

The beacon for October, November, De- 
cember, January, February and March. 

The outlook for the blind for July. 

St. Dunstan's review for September, 
October, November, December and Feb- 
ruary. 

Games. 

Playing cards marked in Revised 
Braille. 



18268 5-22 1700 



Vol. 17, No. 3 JULY 1922 



News Notes 



of 



California Libraries 



IN THIS NUMBER— SOME OF THE ITEMS OF INTEREST, 



BUILDING ACTIVITIES— FULLERTON, OXNARD, PALO ALTO. 

STANDARD OIL LIBRARY SERVICE, p. 289. . „ 

DONATIONS FOR LIBRARY BUILDINGS — OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE, PACIFIC 
SCHOOL OF RELIGION. 

SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, p. 278. 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, p. 303-4. 

OPTIMISTS' CLUB GIVES LIBRARY BUILDING TO BARLOW SANATORIUM, 
p. 277. 

KERN COUNTY SUPERVISOR ATTENDS A. L. A. 

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, see Contents. 



California State Library 



CALIFOBNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE. 
SACRAMKNTO, 1922 
19908 



CONTENTS. . 

Page 

HUMANIZING THE A. L. A , 249 

THE TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE CALI- 
FORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION __ 253 

TEMPORARY BRANCHES 255 

BOOKS— ON THE TOP OF THE WORLD 258 

WHAT IS BEING DONE IN STATE TEACHERS' COLLEGES TO GIVE 
PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS A KNOWLEDGE OF THE COUNTY 

LIBRARY ; 260 

LIBRARY PUBLICITY 263 

FIRST LIBRARY TALK BY RADIO 266 

EXCERPTS FROM LETTER OF MISS MARION MORSE 267 

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 268 

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 269 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS 270 

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OF 

GENERAL INTEREST 299 

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 305 

BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS , 310 

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY I 313 

Staff, Etc. 313 

Departments J. : 314 

Recent Accessions 319 

California State Publications Received During April, Mat and 

June, 1922 344 

California City Publications Receivfd During April, May and June, 

1922 ; 349 

Books for the Blind Added During April, May and June, 1922 349 



Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the California 
State Library. 

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, Sac- 
ramento, California. 

Note. — Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded. 

Entered as second-class matter December, 1913, at the post office at Sacramento, 
California,' under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918. 



HUMANIZING THE A. L. A. 

DETROIT, 1922. 

By Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian, California State Library. 



It may be news to a few of the 5000 
sturdy souls who make up the American 
Library Association, that it really stands 
in need of being brought more closely in 
touch with human affairs, that it is not 
now a cog of first importance in the big 
world machine. But the facts are that it 
does lack certain essential qualities and 
characteristics which, if strenuously 
sought, might be attained, that its mem- 
bers are strangely enough too unearthly, 
too sublimated, too far off the ground to 
be able to accomplish their mission of high 
importance on this earth. I have long had 
a vague feeling that the indictment above 
made might be true ; I have, perhaps, in 
times past tried to phrase portions of the 
charge ; but its full burden did not touch 
my consciousness until the meeting in 
Detroit. The contrast between the func- 
tioning of that great dynamic city and of 
our large but static order was too vivid to 
escape even my eyes, accustomed as they 
have become to considering what is in the 
A. L. A. is right. I may add that a west- 
ern business man, who in June, 1922, got 
his first insight into the workings of the 
Association, was an instrument in my 
awakening. What he thought and what 
he said shall be retained by me as worthy 
of consideration but not necessary of 
quotation. The charge was as much di- 
rected at me as at my associates. The 
substance of the whole matter may how- 
ever, be expressed in the thought I have 
tried to convey in choosing my title : the 
A. L. A. does stand in need of being 
humanized. 

The Detroit News of June 27, 1922, 
carried an editorial entitled "The Li- 
brarians." To begin with it sketches in a 
general way the thought implied in the 
word progress ; and decides that in the de- 
velopment of a community other things 
are "to be considered besides mere geo- 
graphical expansion and increase in popu- 
lation." It concludes that, "A lively and 
many-sided interest in the affairs of the 
community on the part of all its members 
is the best safeguard for the progress of 
the group." It holds the belief that "ideas 
can be spread only through the medium 
of books * * * that the more books are 
19908 



read in any community the more will that 
community be safe against ignorance and 
prejudice." The job of circulating enough 
books to squeeze error and prejudice and 
ignorance out of the land, the writer quite 
naturally leaves to the A. L. A. and its 
membership. The indictment innocently 
enough and quite unintentionally comes 
near the end of the editorial in these 
words : "Although removed from intimate 
contact with the noise and bustle of the 
communities from which these delegates 
come, they do none the less play an im- 
portant part in the progress of the cities 
in which they labor quietly behind circu- 
lation desks and in between the stacks." 

In the opinion of this writer, librarians 
are still cloistered, still myopic, still qui- 
etly unobtrusive ; but do, nevertheless, 
wield some sort of influence in the life of 
the community. I am willing to agree 
with him, I can see certain signs of a 
less untroubled sleep ; and am only im- 
patient that the entire Association does 
not perceive its shortcomings more clearly 
and set itself energetically to the correc- 
tion of its failure. As a good example of 
progress, there is the city of Detroit — 
about whose working, more later. 

It is not to, be denied that all confer- 
ences held in the heart of a thriving, busi- 
ness environment suffer a heavy handicap. 
I have had some little experience with 
other associations, however, and I am al- 
most convinced that the A. L. A. permits 
itself to be dominated by circumstances. 
It is not quite able to rise superior to its 
surroundings and thereby register a tri- 
umph greater than if it worked unimpeded. 
The trouble, perhaps, is that while our 
band is upon the road it is not of a mind 
where it is going. It were unkind, in sub- 
stantiation of this statement, to cite the 
enlarged program. A great pother was 
made, the world was on edge, all that 
remained for the librarian to keep it so 
was for him quickly and neatly to slip 
his chunk underneath. And while he set 
about the job with enthusiasm he soon 
found that his various members do not 
work in coordination ; and for every foot 
he gained in one direction, he lost twelve 
inches in the other. He was unconvinced 



250 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



himself ; he was, therefore, not a very con- 
vincing advocate before the jury of the 
world. 

It would not be surprising if an associa- 
tion with a membership running into the 
thousands and coming together only once 
a year were unable to do team work ; but 
one would expect rather definite action 
from the leaders. In the Council of the 
A. L. A. we may safely assume that the 
directing forces of the organization are to 
be found. Here, if anywhere, we should 
find plan, method, system, precision of 
action. But do we? We do not. The 
Council comes together in solemn con- 
clave ; questions previously announced 
come up for determination and action. 
They are discussed, revised, amended ; and 
almost invariably are referred back to the 
committee whence they came, there to 
slumber for another year. Thus nothing 
is done. What is characteristic of the 
Council in large measure is characteristic 
of the whole Association. 

If one should venture to pick out a tag 
for the present period of American his- 
tory, he might not be far wrong if he 
called it the "age of conventions." In the 
early middle ages the world witnessed 
wave' after wave of humanity surging re- 
lentlessly from east to west, with no inten- 
tion of swinging back again to the place 
whence it came. Today we see hun- 
dreds of thousands, for example the Shrin- 
ers of 1922, setting forth from all corners 
of the country towards some Mecca, quite 
taking possession of the city in which they 
gather, parading its streets in gay attire, 
filling its hotels and theaters to the point 
of suffocation, tying up great yards of 
Pullman trains ; and at the end of the 
allotted time and purse going back home 
again, ready for the daily grind. Hold- 
ing conventions has become an art of a 
kind. This year in Detroit it began to 
appear that even the A. L. A. had learned 
some of the rudiments of the game : the 
machinery of registration ran smoothly 
and for the first time in its history a 
registration fee — small, as might be ex- 
pected — was collected. It costs somebody 
money to stage a big gathering. Nobody 
would expect to get into any sort of show 
without the price ; yet it was estimated 
that several hundred persons failed to put 
up their little dollar, and others even spoke 
on the convention floor against the in- 



iquity of expecting librarians to pay. If 
our directing forces could be induced to 
investigate a number of big gatherings or- 
ganized on a business basis, it might be 
possible to develop sufficient sentiment to 
put the A. L. A., financially, on a par 
with modern convention practices. 

The great difficulty, as I see it, is that 
the library profession has grown up on an 
unwholesome diet of penury. No other 
public service is being maintained^ at such 
a low rate. The people expect the library 
to function on almost nothing a year ; and 
librarians themselves have too generally 
acquiesced in the arrangement. It would 
be considered little short of sacrilegious to 
hint that the openhandedness of a certain 
well intentioned millionaire had led the 
public to view their libraries as a free will 
gift of the gods, as something capable of 
living without visible means of support, 
as an institution sentimentally valuable 
but scarcely worth paying for on the tax 
bill ; and yet without doubt there is a 
grain of truth in such a thought. No one 
expects the public school system to be 
supported by private benefaction. The 
people may squirm at the enhanced cost of 
new school buildings which are rising like 
mushrooms of great stability all over the 
country, they may look twice at the pretty 
fair salaries of the present day teaching 
profession ; but they foot the bills. And 
the schools are going forward at a rate of 
progress so great that the '49 library coach 
is not required to breathe their dust for 
long — they are so soon out of sight. Yet, 
if I remember correctly, one of the speak- 
ers at Detroit lifted a prayer for another 
giver of library buildings. What we need 
rather is a well planned and continued 
campaign to convince the public of a fact 
with which all ages have been conversant, 
that if a thing is worth having, it is 
worth paying for, and that gifts too often 
defeat their good intentions. Rome was 
not built up through munificent donations ; 
but, if I read history aright, much giving 
accompanied that once glorious nation 
on her downward course. 

One of the subjects attacked from all 
angles was that of recruiting for the 
profession. The battalions representing 
America, Canada, college libraries, special 
libraries, school libraries, children's li- 
braries, and library schools all poured in 
their hottest fire on this strongly fortified 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



HUMANIZING THE A. L. A. 



251 



citadel in the Hindenburg line resisting 
library progress. No startling, or all-sav- 
ing charges were driven home ; but a 
belief was somehow current that in the end 
all would be well. Now as a matter of 
cold fact is the problem of recruiting not 
merely one of figures? The work is fas- 
cinating to individuals of a certain type ; it 
gives opportunity for that missionary 
spirit which no longer finds its happiness 
in ministering to the heathen ; it offers 
employment to a finer element of modern 
society which actually wants to serve 
society. The men and women who entered 
its portals years ago could not be driven 
therefrom except by physical force. The 
rub comes, however, with the younger 
additions, the latest accessions to the 
ranks, as it were. They are subject to 
modern demands in the matter of dress, 
entertainment, table and domicile. It is 
not to be supposed that they are going to 
enter upon a profession of doubtful mone- 
tary rewards while others of greater 
promise, and shorter hours, beckon allur- 
ingly. Yes, just plain money in sufficient 
quantity will fill the library ranks ; and I, 
for one, have no fear as to the quality of 
the recruits. 

In one respect librarians in convention 
are under a great handicap. Their work, 
as the editorial writer in the Detroit News 
has expressed it, is behind desks and be- 
tween quiet stacks. The public is induced 
by whispered example, during fifty-one 
weeks of the year, to modulate its voice, 
to speak indeed as though someone were 
dead in the house. Is it to be wondered, 
then, that during the fifty-second week in 
convention assembled the librarian is un- 
able to raise his voice over his chin? It 
has so long been accustomed to go trick- 
ling down his collar that to do otherwise 
would be bolshevistic, or revolutionary to 
say the least, even though the audience 
behind the tenth row in chorus repeat 
and reiterate, "louder, louder." And when 
a modern pied piper in the form of a news- 
paper distributing ice cream cones gathers 
the children of the town under the assem- 
bly room window, then perhaps even 
pebble trained Demosthenes would speak 
in vain ; but for a librarian the task were 
hopeless. My urgent recommendation, 
therefore, would be that all professional 
speakers on library programs subscribe for 
and actually take a full year's course in 



public speaking before making a bow be- 
fore the gathering. How vividly did 
President Burton of the University of 
Michigan stand out in contrast to almost 
every librarian who appeared on the 
program. A little more of the dramatic 
in the presentation would quite obviously 
make up for certain dryness of matter. 

Librarians who were on the program 
and who struggled to get it over may, if 
by accident they should ever learn of my 
strictures, counter with the charge that 
library audiences are really not easy to 
speak to. And I for one would have to 
acknowledge the justness of the retort. It 
has become customary in most big con- 
ventions to have a sergeant-at-arms and 
an efficient corps of assistants, who 
would see to it that the audience was 
properly seated, that aisles and exits were 
not blocked and that the speakers were 
not unduly handicappeu by the incoming 
and outgoing of restless auditors. Li- 
brarians bring their whispering faculties, 
sharpened by long practice, into the meet- 
ing ; they take the opportunity there to 
greet old friends and catch up on the past 
year's news ; they indulge in much note or 
letter writing — which?; they seem unable 
to sit through even the best of the pro- 
gram ; and they gather in a dense crowd 
at the main entrance. The speakers, there- 
fore, do play an uphill game ; in the lan- 
guage of an old time sentimental song, 
they are more to be pitied than censured. 

The Association, in the opinion of a 
noted visiting English librarian, is too 
large. His judgment may be correct ; per- 
haps we ought to divide our delegates, per- 
mitting some of them to come within the 
voting pale while the larger group remains 
without merely as auditors. Certainly it 
is difficult for all to get together in gen- 
eral assembly ; and when members are scat- 
tered into sections and allied associations, 
it is difficult to get appreciable results. 
Librarians, if one may hazard a guess, are 
very much like the churches : they are indi- 
vidualists ; they believe in splitting the 
faith ; they do not run well in the pack. 
A show man, a Barnum who had failed to 
land under the big tent, might conceivably 
organize our profession into a three-ring 
circus, all carrying on simultaneously ; but 
we have no assurances that even then we 
would find happiness in service, though we 
might develop greater efficiency. 



252 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



As a westerner I was more than mod- 
erately interested in the time and attention 
given to the subject of county libraries. 
Not so many years ago the topic was one 
which was whispered about, but not put 
on the printed program. Unfortunately, 
the President's radio talk thereon got by 
me ; my receiver was not working prop- 
erly, or perhaps cross currents interfered. 
But whatever the ideas expressed, the plan 
was a good one and I trust those more 
fortunate than myself were properly con- 
vinced — especially, of course, the nonpro- 
fessional listeners-in. The county library 
section was a disappointment. Why 
should anyone travel even one mile, to 
say nothing of fifteen hundred, to hear 
an endless discussion of whether county 
branch custodians should be called libra- 
rians or custodians ; and whether a branch 
is a branch or merely. a deposit station. 
After all, beloved, the county library is 
no esoteric philosophy : it is merely an 
attempt to secure enough money to give 
a fair service under competent direction. 
It is much more a matter of rates and 
incomes than it is of deposit stations, cus- 
todians and book wagons. 

There are always, however, interesting 
features about these annual gatherings — 
in addition to the struggle to get three 
meals of a sort each day. The town, the 
local setting, is a consideration. As there 
are few repetitions in the place selected, 
a regular attendant ought in time to 
know his country pretty thoroughly. The 
old timers used to say that travel maketh a 
full man — that was in the days before 
Volstead elevated the raisin to aristocrat 
rank. Of Detroit we have all heard much. 
I have never driven a Ford car, but the 
rumor that this ubiquitous vehicle might 
possibly be passed out to each registrant 
as a souvenir of his visit did not detract 
from the anticipated pleasures of the trip. 
Naturally a city which doubled in stature 
in ten years, jumping from 500,000 to 
1,000,000, would be interesting to a resi- 
dent of the only state boasting a Los An- 
geles ; besides, who would not want to visit 
the headquarters of the manufacturer just 
mentioned, whose invention has so clearly 
and forcefully demonstrated the joys of 
walking. I had the pleasure — of a kind — 
in going through the mammoth plant 
which turns out a car with every tick of 



the clock. It is a marvel of ingenuity and 
modern factory engineering ; and to me, 
if I were compelled to labor therein, would 
quite surpass the machines of other days 
especially designed for devilish torture. I 
rail at the library on occasion ; but am 
ready enough to acknowledge its charms 
in contrast with the establishment run by 
the owner of the Dearborn Independent. 

One of the big attractions of Detroit 
professionally is, of course, its beautiful 
new main library building which is evi- 
dence sufficient that this big city on the 
St. Claire River believes in library service 
and is willing to pay for it. Here on the 
first evening of the conference was held 
the annual reception under conditions 
which contributed vastly to the enjoy- 
ability of the event. 

Detroit, you may know, is a very popu- 
lar convention city. It is full of life and 
activity ; and has cultivated the art of 
hospitality to a degree which makes the 
visitor feel the whole business was staged 
for his personal entertainment. The Pub- 
lic Library in its every-day work has de- 
veloped a sense of its responsibility for 
the human" side of its staff and of their 
relationship to the local citizenry. Through 
the office of its social secretary, a work 
which with great profit might, well be 
emphasized among libraries generally, it 
was easy for the A. L. A. and Detroit to 
plan and execute the happiest of arrange- 
ments for the "parties" of the convention. 
The plays given by local talent, the dance, 
and the "moonless" moonlight excursion 
on the good ship "Brittania" were events 
of first importance in the humanizing of 
the A. L. A. The next city in which the 
Association gathers may not be so for- 
tunate in the personality and ability of its 
director of social events, it may not have 
a river St. Claire made picturesque by 
the dachshund of water commerce, the ore 
vessels, it may not be able to offer as 
added attractions factories of the bewil- 
dering complexity of the Ford plant ; but 
it should present something which will give 
the librarians knowledge of new conditions 
and people, and an interest beyond their 
field limited too often to a view from be- 
hind the charging desk. Detroit acknowl- 
edges that she is both "beautiful and dy- 
namic." Where do we go next year? 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



CONVENTION OF C. L. A. 



253 



THE TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE 
CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

By Thelma Brackettv, Librarian, Siskiyou County Free Library. 



The Hotel del Coronado was the set- 
ting for the twenty-seventh annual con- 
vention of the California Library 
Association, which met June 12 to 15, 
1922. The varied beauty of the grounds 
aucl country about the rambling old 
building presented ample opportunity to 
the more energetic of the two hundred 
and fifty persons (a goodly number) 
gathered together to play between ses- 
sions. Boating, swimming, horseback 
riding and automobile trips are all as 
much a part of Hotel del Coronado as 
the generous efforts of the management 
to make the conventions within its walls 
a success. 

To the staffs of the San Diego city 
and county libraries was due in large 
measure the instant friendliness of the 
gathering. With these cordial hostesses 
welcoming each newcomer, and present- 
ing greetings in the form of dainty 
corsage bouquets, even those new to the 
California Library Association could not 
but feel welcome. 

A pleasing feature of this year's pro- 
gram was the unity of subject, which 
fitted each session into its place in a 
carefully constructed plan. The keynote 
struck in the opening session was main- 
tained throughout, an additional paper, 
at each general session thus developing 
the theme of "Books and Book Makers 
of the United States." Miss Helen E. 
Haines, of the Los Angeles Library 
School, Miss Myrtle Ruhl of the State 
Library, Mrs Gertrude C. Maynard of 
Jones Book Store, Los Angeles, Guy E. 
Marion of Los Angeles, and Miss 
Eleanore Foster of Bullock's Book 
Department, Los Angeles, ably assisted 
in throwing light on various angles of 
this broad question. 

Story tellers for children delighted the 
audience at the opening of the sessions. 
Mrs Ritza Freeman Reardon, Miss 
Wilhelmina Harper, and Miss Sadie 
Hoffman, vividly presented tales which 
enthralled the grown-ups quite to the 
degree that the smaller children respond. 
California is naturally proud of its 
library system (as of what is it not 



proud?), and indeed it has reason so 
to be. Surely, however, such a collection 
as the Henry E. Huntington Library is 
an institution to justify even the Cali- 
forniac's boasting. George Watson Cole, 
Librarian of the Huntington Library, 
spoke on the Californiana of the collec- 
tion, and brought a realization of the 
unusually admirable qualities of the man 
who, as his choice of a pastime, would 
build up a collection such as this, for 
the good of all people. Another speaker 
on special collections was George T. 
Clark, Librarian of the Stanford Uni- 
versity Library, who presented as his 
subject the Hoover Collection of war 
material, which is being gathered at 
great expense as source material for 
future historical study. 

There were two speakers from outside 
of California — the Misses Florence and 
Jacqueline M. Overton, both of the New 
York Public Library. Miss Anne Mul- 
beron, who also was on the program, is 
not an outsider, but simply our own 
come back to us. She is at heart a 
Co.lifornian still. 

Helpful as are the programs at a 
convention, it is the minutes snatched 
from meetings, the dinner (or breakfast) 
hour gatherings, wherein one discusses 
special problems and gains knowledge of 
the intimate decisions of others, — it is 
these moments of personal contact which 
loom large in the memory. Round table 
discussions are but amplified breakfast 
chats, and as such are invaluable. It is 
to me a matter of speculation as to what 
a convention would be if composed 
entirely of round tables. Given such 
leaders as Miss Susan T. Smith, whose 
municipal libraries section talked until 
past even a Hotel del Coronado luncheon 
hour, what snarled library problems 
could not be untangled? At any rate, 
the evening devoted to cataloging and 
reference work gave ample evidence of 
the possibilities in such an arrangement. 

To supplement the lectures were gath- 
ered very helpful and stimulating exhibits 
of books. Besides these, reading and 
buying lists, copies of which could be 



254 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



secured on request, and a display of 
supplies and methods useful for County 
Library work, attracted gratifying atten- 
tion. Of all the exhibits, however, for 
one especially were we grateful. Mrs 
May Dexter Henshall, with character- 
istic forethought, realized the ethical 
value of her collection of pictures taken 
during Sacramento's Days of '49. Prob- 
ably none except those who were in 
Sacramento during that memorable week, 
or who were fortunate enough to be at 
the Convention, will ever again see our 
genial State Librarian in dainty whisk- 
ers ! Seriously, though, our State Library 
friends in their old fashioned costumes 
made a charming group. 

Besides the natural opportunity for 
pleasure, the San Diego hostesses made 
sure of organized good times. One after- 
noon was given over to trips, of which a 
choice of one out of three could be taken. 
It was a case, verily, of "Oh, to be 
triplets !" A boat trip about San Diego's 
glorious bay, a visit to the new La Jolla 
Library (with a delightful automobile 
ride and tea as well), inspection of the 
new Marine Base — how could one choose? 
And yet, the afternoon over, it was 
found that each of the three trips had 
been the most enjoyable of them all. 

Monday evening likewise was given 
over to a good time. Before the custo- 
mary dancing of the evening, a short 
entertainment was given. Unexpectedly 
tragic consequences followed, for it was 
indubitably proved that members of the 
San Diego city and county libraries are 
out of their element in the library world. 
Miss Althea Warren, who wrote the very 
clever play, "On the Unsorted Shelves," 
and who, as The Deep Book, convinced 
her audience of her thorough understand- 
ing of the psychopathology of everyday 
life, would undoubtedly be in her proper 
place in the world as an actor-playwright. 
The other Books on the Shelves, too, 
would be certainly more at home behind 
the footlights, if one may judge by their 
able presentation of their subtle char- 
acters. 

In regard to purely C. L. A. business, 
the report of the Certification Committee 
ranks first in the year's work. A basis 
of certification has been worked out, and 
blanks sent to all library workers in the 
state. The response has been encourag- 
ingly cordial. The annual election of 



officers was held, and Miss Susan T. 
Smith, Sacramento Public Librarian, was 
chosen as President, Miss Jeannette M. 
Drake, Pasadena Public Librarian, as 
Vice-President, and Miss Hazel Gibson 
of the Sacramento County Library as 
Secretary-Treasurer. At the close of the 
last session a letter from the Eureka 
Chamber of Commerce invited the Cali- 
fornia Library Association to meet next 
year in Humboldt County. 

So much for the California Library 
Association. Of the program of the 
California County Librarians' Conven- 
tion, I shall mention only two outstanding 
features of all the helpful and interesting 
matter offered. One was the evening of 
hilarious enjoyment afforded by Miss 
Clara B. Dills, who gave a very graphic 
and vivid sketch of her trip to the Orient. 
Miss Dills knows how to have a good 
rime — and she knows how to share it with 
others. She did both, that evening. 
Moreover, she displayed a whole trous- 
seau of "very elegant" Oriental coats to 
her admiring audience, by the simple 
expendient of wearing them all until she 
was too warm longer to delay the fashion 
show. We were all glad Miss Dills had 
been to the Orient. 

The other feature of the Convention 
was an actual exhibition of what can be 
done with music. Through the co-opera- 
tion of Miss Eleanor Hitt, a group of 
country one-room school children was 
brought to the hotel. There, surrounded 
by strangers, they responded in marvelous 
wise to the efforts of Mrs Frances Green- 
wood, Supervisor of Music. A descrip- 
tion of what she accomplished would be 
futile — no one not there would believe 
it, and those present will never forget it. 
Her time was unfortunately limited, and 
yet long enough to demonstrate the devel- 
opment of concentration, memory, reason- 
ing power, music appreciation. And 
through it all the kiddies were having a 
delightful time. Long life to the Mrs 
Greenwoods ! 

There was a shadow over both conven- 
tions, cast by the loss of those members 
who have died during the year. The final 
moments of all were fittingly given to 
them, who, though absent in body, were 
happily present in the influence of their 
personalities, which will remain always 
with those to whom they were endeared. 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



TEMPORARY BRANCHES. 



255 



TEMPORARY BRANCHES.* 

By Carmelita Duff, Librarian, Plumas County Free Library. 



The. county library system which would 
be most effective must be sufficiently 
tlexible to meet successfully and easily 
the unusual demands made upon it. It 
is a far cry from the solidly built 
Carnegie branch in the thriving town 
with its well ordered shelves and bookish 
atmosphere to the box of books nailed to 
a tree in the forest. These are extremes 
of service, to be sure, but illustrative of 
the wide field over which the county 
library may extend its usefulness. Open- 
ing as it does the broad vista of the 
world of books to men and women in 
places remote and near, the need to 
adapt itself to new and untried condi- 
tions is of great importance. 

At the extreme of the box of books 
nailed to the forest tree is an interesting 
type of temporary branch supplying read- 
ing to groups whose work necessitates 
camp life. These are branches which fill 
a need for a limited time, but, in spite of 
their short lives, the results which they 
produce may be as enduring as those of 
more permanent establishment. A few of 
the branches typical of this kind of 
library service in counties of California 
are noted as illustrations. 

In the mountains of Humboldt county 
is a California Highway Commission Day 
Labor Camp. This is a convict camp and 
one may easily imagine the diversity of 
types represented in the men. The 
request for books first came to the 
county library from one of the prisoners 
through a nearby branch. It was winter 
aud difficult for the county librarian to 
make the arduous journey to the camp, 
so a friend of the library carried the 
word to the prisoners. He traveled by 
stage, by truck and afoot through mud 
and snow, reaching by night the spot 
where the camp was pitched. When 
word was given to the men that someone 
was there to tell them about the library, 
ih?y flocked in eagerly with many re- 
quests for books which they wished to 
have sent to them. A few of the books 
for which they asked that night were : 
an encyclopedia which was to be an 



authority to settle their disputes, Taus- 
sig's "Principles of Economics," a life of 
Roosevelt, "Scientific American Encyclo- 
pedia of Formulas," Plutarch's "Lives," 
books on Greek mythology, foreign and 
domestic exchange, electricity, steam 
engines, flora and fauna of California, 
sea shells and fish. Of course they 
wanted fiction, too, — a few classics, but 
chiefly western and adventure stories. 
Later when the librarian visited the 
branch she found it in a tent provided 
for it. Moss had been brought in from 
rhe woods and placed at the door to 
give the appearance of a lawn and the 
whole aspect of the place was inviting. 
Shelves had been built and the books 
carefully arranged upon them, certain 
sections being reserved for the magazines 
which came into the camp from various 
sources. Those provided by the county 
library were "National Geographic" and 
"Travel," which were the choice of the 
men ; the lighter, fiction type coming to 
them by donation. On one shelf were 
wild flowers, rocks and others specimens 
awaiting identification. The custodian of 
the branch is one of the prisoners, up 
for murder, but a man of education — a 
happy chance since he can better see the 
needs of the men and know how to supply 
Lhem. Books have been sent from the 
county library for pleasure and study 
and, in addition, material on special sub- 
jects has been borrowed from the State 
Library as well as books in foreign lan- 
guages for purely recreational reading. 
A few of the later requests from this 
branch are indicative of the type of 
service which the county library is giving. 
The men asked for books on engineering, 
business methods, and others on special 
vocations as well as aids for foreigners 
learning the English language. Surely 
here the library is grasping its opportu- 
nity to be a socializing influence and is 
doing its part to fit these men into the 
world as useful citizens in a happier day 
when the penalty of crime has been paid. 
The library is doing a work that is as 
truly missionary as that of any welfare 



'Talk given at County Librarians' Convention, Coronado, Julie 1922. 



256 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



organization and the great value lies in 
the fact that the will for it comes from 
the men themselves. 

Partly in Imperial county and partly 
in Mexico lies the great G. M. Ranch of 
one million acres. At one time a large 
camp was maintained on the American 
side and it was here that a branch of the 
county library was placed. When the 
branch was opened, the county librarian 
was invited to dinner at the big ranch- 
house and was asked to talk to the hun- 
dred or more men gathered in the mess- 
hall. Since most of the men were Mexi- 
cans with a limited knowledge of the 
English language, an interpreter was 
necessary, but despite this difficulty, the 
librarian declared she had never talked 
to a more interested audience. After the 
talk one of the men jumped to his feet 
and called for "three cheers for the county 
librarian." These were most enthusiasti- 
cally and resoundingly given. Many of 
the men wanted to learn English and for 
them were sent great numbers of primers 
adapted for this purpose. Spanish fiction 
was also sent, but the little primers were 
always in demand and it was learned 
later that it was through this branch 
library that the desire to learn the Eng- 
lish language came to many of the men. 
Here is the library at work as an Ameri- 
canizing agent. The book is recognized as 
one of the potent factors in Americaniza- 
tion programmes and fortunate is the 
library that, in spite of isolation and 
remoteness from centers of social work, 
can be so effectual an instrument in this 
great movement. 

A great many of the county libraries 
in California give this kind of service in 
one form or another. Branches are 
found in construction camps, in logging 
camps, in camps of trail — and road 
makers, surveyors — wherever there is a 
desire for books and reading. Only a 
few are noted here. 

In Plumas county is found another 
and less extensive type of California 
Highway Commission Camp. A crew of 
men is surveying in a rugged and pre- 
cipitous gorge for a highway to connect 
mountain and valley. The party moves 
from one location to another, spending 



a month or two in each place. Each 
time the camp is moved it is accompanied 
by the branch library. The books are 
kept in the living tent of the wife of the 
engineer in charge of the project. It is 
a pleasant tent made attractive by femi- 
nine touches and gay with wild flowers — ■ 
a homey spot to which the men may 
come. In one corner stands a book-case 
built of lathes which the men use in 
surveying. This holds the branch library. 
The custodian describes the opening of 
the library at a new location. It has 
been a hard day making camp and the 
men are ready for books and quiet. One 
by one they arrive at the door of the 
tent. "Is the library open yet?" "In 
just two minutes," promises the custo- 
dian, busy with saw and hammer. The 
last nail is driven, the books are on the 
shelves and the library is open. Books 
mean a great deal in this camp. The 
men are all young, intelligent and ambi- 
tious. Practically all are studying — 
either subjects allied with their work or 
some outside interest. While the crew 
consists of trained men, others are em- 
ployed locally to serve as axemen, whose 
work is unskilled labor. Several of these 
have remained with the party and are 
now studying to fit themselves for more 
expert work. 

In this county also, a large part of 
which lies in national forest area, books 
are sent' to the lookout stations during 
the summer months when they are in 
operation. Once a week the solitude of 
the lookout is broken by the arrival of 
the forest service packet with food, 
water, mail and books from the county 
library. 

In Imperial county a party of govern- 
ment surveyors wanted books but could 
not load their wagon too heavily. To 
meet this situation, one book was sent 
for each man in the crew — one book was 
a small addition, indeed, to a man's bag- 
gage. When they reached a branch of 
the county library the books were left 
and here a new collection awaited them 
to carry on to the next branch. 

In the depths of the forest in Siskiyou 
county is a trailmakers' branch — a 
T. N. T. powder box filled with books 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



TEMPORARY BRANCHES. 



257 



nailed to a fir tree. This branch is 
equipped with a tight door to keep out 
the chipmunks and woodrats. 

There is yet another type of temporary 
branch and one that is probably more 
far-reaching than the others because it 
is for the children. Each year, Kern 
County Free Library sends books and 
music records to the Kiddie Kamp for 
underweight children. One can imagine 
the- delight with which these are received. 

More interesting is the branch main- 
tained in the school conducted by the 
State Board of Education for the children 
of migratory parents. This is a school 
which follows the children of parents 
employed in seasonal labor. During the 
season of walnut-picking, the school is 
taken to the walnut-pickers, then to the 
cotton fields, to the asparagus growers 
and so on. The teacher arrives with her 
tent school and simple equipment. It is 
all very meager because the school is 
still in an experimental stage and the 
funds provided do not cover all needs. 
Classes are held in the morning so the 



afternoon will be free for work in the 
fields. Some of the children had never 
been to school before and many of them 
knew no English. The county libraries 
within whose boundaries the school has 
been temporarily stationed have been 
generous in supplying books, maps and 
whatever else would help the teacher. 
Here again the library is taking advan- 
tage of its opportunity to assist in an 
Americanization work of great merit. 

From many of the branches giving 
books to men in camps there come to the 
county librarian requests that make her 
realize the great field of usefulness that 
is offered. But even though the far- 
reaching results may not be so imme- 
diately visible, the temporary pleasure 
that is derived from the adventure story 
that is passed from hand to hand in a 
camp is a result worth reckoning. She 
Is glad if the branch library is an accept- 
able substitute for the gambler's cabin 
and the library book a stimulation for the 
mind stale from inactivity or the rough 
talk of chance companions. 



258 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Juty, 1922 



BOOKS— ON THE TOP OF THE WORLD * 

By Gretchen Flower, Librarian, Tulare County Free Library. 



In no part of the county is our 
library service more highly appreciated 
than in Giant Forest, the heart of the 
Sequoia National Park. Attracted by 
the natural beauties of the region and 
impelled by the desire to escape from 
the heat of the valley during the sum- 
mer months, thousands of people take the 
road which leads up through the foot- 
hills over mountain grades which re- 
veal fascinating vistas of snowcapped 
range, until at the end of a four or five 
hour ride they find themselves on a great 
plateau among the peaks. There, at an 
elevation of 6500 feet, in the midst of 
meadows and wild flowers, they are 
greeted by all that a lover of mountains, 
could desire — and in addition, infinite 
leisure. 

To those who have come so far from 
the railroad to spend the summer or en- 
joy a month's vacation ; who have been 
able to include in their baggage only 
such supplies as are required by the sim- 
plest of living, the means of filling in the 
long even days without ultimate restless- 
ness and monotony at times becomes a 
problem. Only a comparatively few 
brave the hardship and uncertainty of 
the long trail trips, most are content 
with an occasional hike to a favorite 
meadow or to the canyon rim Avkere they 
can look out over the ridge of the Great 
Western Divide, and, toward the end of 
the day, watch the glory of the setting 
sun fade upon the pale granite and snow 
of the peaks. And to those whose days 
are made eventful only by the small 
manifestations of forest life, by the 
swift leap of the deer across the trail, or 
the visit of the familiar bear who comes 
with heavy rolling tread to seek food at 
camp, the way of diversion, the oppor- 
tunity to read and study offered by the 
collection of books in the county library's 
branch becomes one of the greatest 
attractions of the park. 

Library service to the patrons of Giant 
Forest is not new. In 1914 a small col- 
lection of books was deposited in the 



home of one of the campers, and a small 
sum paid to a custodian who gave it her 
attention at irregular hours. Few per- 
manent camps were established at that 
time and the need for recreational read- 
ing was not great. But with the im- 
provement of the roads, both within the 
park boundaries and without, extending 
to the county highways, the patronage of 
the park began to grow, until in 1921, 
with the establishment of the system of 
road control, the number of registered 
visitors exceeded 2S,00O. The value of 
the library as a recreational asset was 
promptly recognized by this great body 
of campers, who came fairly embarrassed 
with a sense of time to spend, and de- 
mands for books grew accordingly. 

This growth in attendance at our 
Tulare County Playground was not un- 
foreseen. Efforts to improve the camp- 
ing facilities within the park, to elimin- 
ate time and risk in travel over the 
mountain roads and to advertise the 
beauties of the region would surely re- 
sult in increased attendance. Looking 
toward that need for enlargement of the 
library which the steady growth of cir- 
culation, keeping pace with the increased 
attendance at the park, made certain, it 
was decided in 1920 to provide the 
library with larger quarters, more con- 
spicuously located. Fortunately plans 
for a new administration building were 
then under way, and in these plans it 
was possible to allow a central room 
which would be given over largely to 
library purposes. 

In order to meet more adequately the 
growing patronage of the branch, a cus- 
todian was appointed who at an increased 
salary should be on duty from 2 to 
5 p.m. each week day. The wife of the 
chief ranger was persuaded to take 
charge of the library and her thorough 
acquaintance with the ways of the ad- 
ministration and of those who camped 
within the park, has been one of the 
chief factors in the success of the library. 
The collection of books was increased to 



*Talk given at County Librarians' Convention, Coronado, June 1922. 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



BOOKS — ON TOP OF WORLD. 



259 



350 titles and all who came, campers and 
transients, were encouraged to use the 
books freely. 

The response was immediate and the 
enthusiasm with which the campers re- 
ceived this improved library service was 
evident from the first. Though the 
library was opened June 15, the real 
influx of campers did not begin until the 
last of the month. Nevertheless, at the 
end of July the custodian reported over 
1000 books read. On this basis the 
superintendent of the park in his report 
estimated a circulation of 3500 for the 
season, but an early fall sent the camp- 
ers "down the hill" and actual use would 
be registered in numbers several hundred 
less. Considering that the collection was 
a small one, 350 books, and that the 
books were in actual use only three 
months, the turnover or circulation of 
approximately 3000 furnishes most grati- 
fying support of our policy of supplying 
an interesting and varied collection of 
timely books to our county residents, 
many of whom spend three months of 
each year in the mountains, and our 
guests, some of whom return year after 
year to share the wonders of the park. 
In this connection it should be noted 
that, although we waived the rule re- 
quiring transients to deposit a small sum 
when borrowing books, not one book was 
lost or unaccounted for. 

Patrons of the branch are not confined 
in their reading to the books on deposit. 
The special request privilege, such a 
vital part of the county library loan sys- 
tem, is granted to all who register at the 
library and if ever a. reader appreciated 
the library's effort to' place in his hands 
the book which holds special interest for 
him, it is when he has leisure in which 
to read. Request slips are mailed fre- 
quently to the main office by the custo- 
dian and the books requested are for- 
warded with little delay by parcel post. 
The surprise and delight with which this 
phase of the service is greeted by those 
who have left so many of the gifts of 
"civilization" behind is constantly re- 
ported by our custodian and other 
friends of the library. 

As might be expected, the subjects in 



which the greatest interest is expressed 
are those connected with the natural 
history of the region. The library is 
co-operating with the Park Administra- 
tion in its efforts to create and encourage 
the interest and spirit of inquiry which 
will extend the general information on 
our national parks. Books have been 
written on the charms of the mountains, 
on the formation of the Sierra, the 
species and habits of the wild folk, the 
names and habitats of the flowers and 
trees, and many of these Ave have gath- 
ered in our nature library, reserving a 
few titles for reference use only. Classi- 
fied lists have been compiled for the use 
of both children and adults and it is 
expected that these lists will be of special 
interest in connection with the nature 
study trips inaugurated this year under 
the supervision of Judge Walter Fry, 
the chief authority on the flora and 
fauna of Sequoia Park. That an in- 
formal nature study club may be en- 
couraged, a rack is to be provided in 
which specimens of the wild flowers 
brought in from the trails may be dis- 
played and as they are identified, by the 
use of books when necessary, they will 
be labeled for the benefit of all interested. 
The possibilities of a well chosen li- 
brary for increasing the value of our 
national parks, for developing a more 
intimate knowledge and greater love for 
the natural forms, have been recognized 
by the National Park Service. Colonel 
John R. White, Superintendent of Se- 
quoia National Park, in his report to the 
Director of National Park Service, Sep- 
tember 1, 1921, said, "There is probably 
no feature which is of such use to 
visitors, or which is of such help to them 
in acquiring a knowledge of the flora of 
the parks. I certainly believe that sim- 
ilar libraries should be conducted in all 
National Parks." And because it is be- 
lieved that out of a greater knowledge 
and love of our trees and flowers will 
result a larger co-operation in protecting 
and preserving the parks to other genera- 
tions, the National Park Service is offer- 
ing all possible support to the library in 
this, one of the most significant phases 
of its service to the county. 



260 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jllty, 1922 



WHAT IS BEING DONE IN STATE TEACHERS' COLLEGES 
TO GIVE PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS A KNOWLEDGE 
OF THE COUNTY LIBRARY.* 

By Sarah E. McCardle, Librarian, Fresno County Free Library. 



Iu the educational system of Califor- 
nia today, the work of the county library 
and the schools is so closely allied that 
it is difficult to think of one without the 
other, yet it is a fact that graduates of 
the State Teachers' Colleges are sadly 
ignorant of the strong thread that binds 
the two institutions together. If we 
would have success in school work by the 
county libraries today, close co-operation 
with the teacher-training institutions of 
the • state is essential. 

The co-operation between the schools 
and the county library might almost be 
called universal in this state ; certainly 
the majority of the schools are enjoying 
the benefits of the system, and it would 
seem therefore that it is more vital than 
formerly that teachers beginning their 
work in the rural schools should be 
familiar with the county library system 
in its special service to the schools. 

The county librarians in those locali- 
ties where close association may be possi- 
ble have not been slow to appreciate 
this, and practically without exception 
the graduating class of every Teachers 
College in the state receives the gospel of 
the County Library School Service at 
least once a year, through talks by the 
county librarian. 

In addition, Butte county is specially 
favored in having a former county libra- 
rian as librarian of the state college, who 
conducts a course on "The Use of the 
Library," which is required for all mem- 
bers of the senior class — and in this 
course she explains the county library 
service. The practice of meeting the 
graduates individually at the end of the 
term, when most of them have received 
their appointments, has been tried by the 
county librarian. She has been able in 
most cases to acquaint the prospective 
teachers with the names of their future 
county librarians as well as a general 
idea of the resources of the libraries in 
the counties in which they are to teach. 



This is ideal — all work with the indi- 
vidual is more satisfactory than with the 
mass ; but with large classes it would be 
impossible. 

In Santa Clara county the college 
librarian conducts a compulsory course 
in library methods and lays stress on 
the work of the county library, but in 
addition the county librarian talks once 
each term to the classes on "Rural 
Schools." 

In Humboldt county the Teachers 
College and the county library have 
grown up together, so there is very close 
relationship there in every phase of the 
work. Humboldt county seems to have 
become so closely allied with the Teachers 
College that it would be difficult to draw 
a line of demarcation to show where the 
interchange begins and ends. They have 
gone one step further than the other 
county libraries in that they have assumed 
the duty of supplying books to the 
Training School by contract, on the same 
basis and under the same system by 
which they serve their county schools. 
This seems to be the most ideal arrange- 
ment of all those in the state ; for here 
the teacher is trained in the county 
library system while she is being trained 
in methods of teaching. It would seem, 
under those circumstances, almost unnec- 
essary to deliver further lectures on the 
County Library System. 

Fresno county has its special phase of 
the work to mention. Beside the usual 
talk to the classes on "Rural Schools" 
each term, a cordial relationship with the 
faculty is maintained through the head of 
the Training School, Dr Frank W. 
Thomas, whose book "Training for effec- 
tive study," the result of years of prac- 
tice, is causing a stir in the educational 
world by its broad minded, practical sug- 
gestions for sane education. Dr Thomas 
has been our guide in the selection of 
books for our Teachers' Library, and due 
to his thoughtful consideration and kindly 



*Talk given at County Librarians' Convention, C'oronado, June 1922. 



vol. 17, no. 3] STATE teachers' college and county library. 261 



suggestions our collection has been aug- 
mented by the best books of professional 
interest to teachers. 

In most of the counties the senior class 
is invited to visit the county library, but 
until the tounty libraries have more 
spacious quarters, only a very small 
class can be handled with any hope of 
sending the prospective teachers away 
with a definite idea of what it is all 
about. 

What is being done has been told, but 
only one county boasts an ideal situation, 
due to the fact that both institutions cut 
their first teeth together. 'A large school 
would not need the services of a young 
struggling county library. 

What must be done to improve the 
situation and to insure the knowledge of 
the county library service to the teachers 
going into the work today? 

The county library school service in 
California has grown from the experi- 
mental stage when it was begun under 
the provisions of the County Free Li- 
brary law of 1911, in 1912, in Yolo 
county, to an established institution 
which includes the majority of the 
schools in every county where active 
county library work is being carried on 
in the state. It has progressed from the 
condition of a few years ago, when teach- 
ers, going to remote districts were con- 
fronted with the problem of teaching 
without aids, or the necessity of institut- 
ing a missionary campaign in the district 
to educate the people of the community 
and the trustees to the realization of the 
advantage of the new system over the 
old. 

With the old system the same books 
remained on the shelves from year to 
year and the children were apt to see the 
same books when they left the school- 
room for the last time that greeted them 
when they began their long journey 
through the grades. Perhaps the book 
had been read, then it would be ragged ; 
but many times the book failed in its 
appeal to the youthful minds and re- 
mained unopened year after year, becom- 
ing more dust laden and faded with each 
succeeding season. 

This system was not inclined to incul- 
cate in the children a love of reading and 
the teacher was often more ignorant of 



the contents of the library than the chil- 
dren, but with the new system books are 
changed each year according to the. re. 
quirements of the teachers. With intelli- 
gent use of the school service, the con- 
ditions would be ideal, but it has been 
found that teachers, coming out of the 
Teachers Colleges today with the mis- 
sionary work completed and the service 
of the county library an established fact, 
are ignorant of the significance of the 
service, because of the ease with which 
books and material may be secured, and 
do not make the effort they should to 
secure the best results from the system. 
That which is handed to us on a golden 
platter is not appreciated as is that 
which we gain by the sweat of the brow. 
To the young teacher, in the confusion 
of the new experience in the endeavor to 
bring into practice all the theories that 
had been absorbed during the training- 
course, the recollection of the informa- 
tion given her in the brief course on 
library methods has entirely disappeared 
and the problem of ordering material 
from the county library intelligently is 
an unexplored jungle of terror. This 
makes the necessity of putting the matter 
clearly before the students prior to their 
going out to their schools more vital each 
year, and closer co-operation between the 
county librarians and the State Teachers' 
Colleges essential. 

The thing needed is a course given by 
those connected with the county library, 
for it will tend to impress more perma- 
nently on the minds of the prospective 
teachers the existence of the department 
of the county library that is carried on 
solely for the benefit of the schools, and 
to relieve that confusion attendant upon 
the first days of the teaching experience. 
Even if the librarian of the Teachers 
College has been a county librarian, her 
interest in that service is subordinate to 
her own library, while that of the county 
librarian is paramount. The school 
librarian is sending the student out — ■ 
her work is finished ; the county librarian 
awaits the student — her work is about to 
begin. Naturally she is more keen about 
their interest in co-operation. At the 
same time it might not be amiss to sug- 
gest that all librarians of Teachers Col- 
leges be required to pass the county 



262 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Juty, 1922 



library examinations before assuming 
the'ir duties as school librarians. 

This course might be included in that 
on "Children's literature" or in those 
colleges where "Library Methods" is 
given, in that, but it seems important 
that the county library should be identi- 
fied with "Book Selection" and "Use of 
Books" rather than "Library Methods." 

It has been my experience that most 
new teachers being overwhelmed with 
the duties confronting them, if they read 
the manual at all, begin at the first page 
and list every item noted to the long- 
list on the last page, without any thought 
of what the lists represent, when they 
make out their first requisition to the 
county library. 

In Fresno county last year, three 
methods in reading were adopted by the 
Board of Education, and some benighted 
innocents sat themselves down and 
ordered all three — why? — because they 
were listed in the manual under first 
grade reading ! 

I confess I am not familiar enough 
with methods followed in the State Col- 
leges, but there is great room for im- 
provement in the intelligent use of the 
county manual, which if not included in 
other courses, should be made an import- 
ant part of the course given by the 
county library. 

With the vogue of the free textbook and 
the increasing use of the supplementary 
texts, the library has become an integral 
part of the educational system, and for 
that reason the Teachers Colleges must 
realize its importance in the training of 
its teachers and make room for it in the 
curriculum for the proper understanding 
of its functions. The Fresno County 
Library is particularly fortunate in hav-> 
ing the cordial interest of the faculty of 
the State Teachers College located in 
Fresno, and they have entered into the 
plan to put before the prospective teach- 



ers next year a course to be given by the 
members of the staff o/f the county 
library, which is to be compulsory, and 
for which a credit will be given. 

In this course of sixteen hours, which 
will cover a semester, the greatest num- 
ber of lectures will be devoted to the 
explanation of the plan of the county 
library system and its school service, the 
use of the county manual, and above all, 
a knowledge of a few good juvenile 
books. In working with the schools the 
importance of the teachers' knowledge 
of children's books has been keenly felt, 
so that interest in reading on the part 
of the children may be created by the 
intelligent recommendation of books by 
the teachers, from actual knowledge of 
the contents of books. 

A love of good books should be im- 
planted in the mind of each child with 
the beginning of his education, for of 
the three subjects essential to intelligence 
— -"readin', ritin' and 'rithmetic," "read- 
in' " is that influence which tends most 
to mold the character of the future citi- 
zen. We talk about "good citizenship" ! 
How does one learn to become a good 
citizen? By reading! How can the 
child be guided in his reading if the 
teacher is unaware of the best book to 
place in his hands? 

The problem accompanying the course 
will be a brief bibliography of books for 
children. Several lectures will be de- 
voted to the use of reference books and 
the two final lectures will probably be 
on professional reading and the use of 
the County Teachers' Libraries. 

Our first year will be only an experi- 
ment wherein we shall probably learn 
as many things as the students, but we 
hope that in another year the State 
Teachers Colleges all over the state will 
recognize the need of such a course and 
introduce it into the curriculum. 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



263 



LIBRARY PUBLICITY * 

By L. K. Newfield, Editor of Sutter Independent, Tuba City. 



It affords me no small amount of 
pleasure to be privileged to speak before 
the members of a library organization. 
First of all, it pleases me to be placed in 
a position where, perhaps, I may be of 
some small service in telling you how to 
get more publicity in the newspapers for 
your libraries. And secondly, it pleases 
me because in appearing here today I 
have an early childhood impression liter- 
ally smashed to smithereens. 

I perhaps never will forget my first 
visit to a little branch library in San 
Francisco when I was about seven or 
eight years old. My cousin was my 
escort, and I was given the opportunity 
to look around and form my own impres- 
sions while she procured her books. I 
was awed in the extreme by the oppres- 
sive silence. I was thunderstruck at 
the myriads of volumes on the shelves. 
But, finally, I was somewhat cowed by 
the appearance of the librarian. A tall, 
thin woman, she had her hair drawn in 
two ropey wisps from front to back, 
terminating in a none too attractive knob 
or knot at the back of her head. Her 
eyes were piercing, her nose aquiline, and 
her lips — ever so thin — she kept tightly 
compressed. As I recall her, she wore 
very mannish garments with a small 
waist and a collar that climbed up her 
n<_ck as though demanding attention 
above all things. I was not pleased with 
her. I was certain that if I ever wanted 
to read the Henty series I would seek it 
elsewhere. 

Today, I observe that times indeed 
have changed. My sex being consider- 
ably outnumbered here, however, I shall 
make no further characterization of the 
modern day librarians before me lest I 
be regarded as getting mighty personal. 
However, permit me to say that I am 
glad times have changed, and that I am 
pleased. 

In communities where I have been 
engaged in the newspaper profession, it 
has been common practice for the libra- 
rian to furnish the newspaper with occa- 



sional matter relative to the names of 
new books available. This contribution 
to the gayety of nations was forthcoming 
about once a month — some months — and 
we always published it when there was 
available space for it. I have an article 
here clipped from a recent issue of one 
of my exchanges from which I shall read 
just an excerpt to indicate the nature of 
the article (an article giving a short 
introduction followed by a partially an- 
notated list of books). This, in my 
opinion, is not bad publicity — but I do 
not consider it the best. 

Transport yourselves, if you will, for a 
moment to the interior of a newspaper 
editorial room. Realize that the average 
newspaper has not space which it is 
desired merely to fill up and get rid of. 
Give a glance at the waste paper baskets 
and have the editor advise you of the tons 
and tons of publicity matter that find a 
way to these receptacles during a year. 
A newspaper editor is literally deluged 
with publicity matter, much of which is 
not fit for use, being propaganda for 
private concerns who seek to escape pay- 
ment for advertising space. A lot of it 
is partisan political rot. And there are 
many other classifications. 

It is patent, then, that to obtain the 
greatest amount of publicity for an 
organization, the publicity should be 
good. It must be interesting not only to 
the confirmed booklover, in the case of 
the library, but to the person who is not 
a constant or frequent reader of books ; 
for in my humble opinion, a library's 
publicity should be largely of such nature 
as to make people wish to visit it and 
improve themselves. 

Some reporters in the larger cities, 
gifted with a nose for news and a vivid 
imagination, if their attention is directed 
to your library, will find plenty of 
material for publication. In the smaller 
communities where the editor not only 
edits the paper but solicits the advertis- 
ing, takes in the coin and pays it out 
again, by the way, acts as his own janitor 



*Paper read at meeting of Ninth District of California Library Association, Marys- 
ville, April 22, 1922. 



264 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



and bookkeeper, and performs a multi- 
tude of additional duties unnecessary to 
enumerate at this time, the community 
library and many other institutions of 
equal importance will frequently be 
neglected, because, though he may have 
a wonderful nose for news and a splendid 
imagination, he hasn't the time to pay 
attention regularly, day in and day out, 
to these institutions. It is therefore up 
to the librarian to assume the initiative 
and keep her eyes and ears open. 

Many librarians have a mania for 
scatistics. They will compile a report 
for a board of supervisors, perhaps, and 
then think to themselves that this report 
will be good meat for the newspapers. 
The report will show the number of fic- 
tion books circulated in a given period ; 
how many nonfiction, and perhaps how 
many juvenile volumes. Statistics are all 
well and good, but unless you add a 
human interest feature to mere figures, 
the average reader is not interested. 

To make my idea perfectly clear, I shall 
read you two sample news stories — not 
necessarily founded on fact but showing 
the different treatment of statistics — and 
I believe my point will be thoroughly 
Uiustrated thereby. Here is the average 
statistical story : 

"big library circulation reported to 
supervisors. 

More than four thousand fiction vol- 
umes were circulated by the Marysville 
Public Library during the month of 
October, according to a report just pre- 
pared by the library staff. This is an 
increase over October of last year of 348 
volumes and by far the most extensive 
circulation reported since the establish- 
ment of the library. Nonfiction volumes 
circulated during the same period totalled 
2237 and juvenile books taken out 
amounted to 1466." 

Now the human interest story : 

"DETECTIVE AGENCIES MAY LOOK TO 
TEHAMA FOR BUDDING SLEUTHS. 

Shades of Sherlock Holmes ! 

Tehama county is demonstrating an 
unusual interest in mystery. Whether 
this movement has been accelerated by 



the commission of recent crimes in this 
vicinity is not known, but the fact 
remains that residents of this community 
are showing a certain trend towards the 
methods employed by Scotland Yard 
detectives and New York police force 
sleuths. 

This information is disclosed in a 
report, compiled yesterday, by Miss 
Gladys Whoosit of the Tehama County 
Free Library, which contains the start- 
ing information that mystery stories 
from the pens of A. Oonan Doyle, E. 
Phillips Oppenheim, Mary Roberts Rine- 
hart and others have had a wonderful 
increase in circulation during the past 
three months. Books falling under the 
classification of mystery stories were 
circulated to the number of 3119 during 
the last quarter. 

And it appears that if the sheriff of 
Butte county is unable to ferret out the 
mystery of the rock throwing in Chico, 
ihere may be some budding sleuths in 
Tetania county who can. 

Detectives will have to be chosen grad- 
ually to fill places in the Pinkerton and 
William J. Burns forces. Miss Whoosit 
feels that perhaps she will be able to 
make some recommendations from Te- 
hama county before long.' f 

You may smile at this little yarn. 
But that's the kind of a tale that news- 
papers like to publish. And they like 
to publish it because that's the kind of 
a story people like to read. The re- 
classification, for example, of fiction 
volumes by the librarian into mystery 
tales, love stories, problem or sex stories, 
historical data, scientific material, agri- 
cultural reference works and the like will 
furnish her with a wealth of information 
from which highly interesting stories 
may be developed. It means, perhaps, a 
little more work. But it gets away from 
mere figures and gives the reader some- 
thing to tickle his fancy. 

Briefly, then, to get more publicity for 
the library, construct that publicity so 
that it will command the editor's atten- 
tion. If you succeed in this, then there 
is no doubt about it attracting the atten- 
tion of the reader. Once you have the 
reader's attention, you can slip in any 
subtle piece of literary propaganda and 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



LIBRARY PUBLICITY. 



265 



in this manner build up the patronage 
and importance of the library in your 
community. 

If you can not write the news story 
j ourselves, the editor will be tickled to 
do so if you will direct his attention to 
what you have observed or compiled. 1 
am going to give you a little advance 
information on a particular story which 
will appear in next week's Sutter Inde- 
pendent, the information or basis of 
which is a number of highly amusing 
pencil sketches made by the president of 
your organisation, Miss Edna Hewitt: 

"LIBRARIANS LIFE IS NOT ALL SMOOTH 
HERE. 

A librarian's life is not all sunshine, 
milk and honey, according to Miss Edna 
Hewitt of the Sutter County Free Li- 
brary. There's a lot of routine work and 
hard labor connected with the book busi- 
ness, and it appears that the only way in 
which a little respite from these arduous 
duties can be obtained is by a recourse 
to the higher arts. 

A series of pencil sketches — the work 
of present and past librarians — was found 
in an obscure portion of the local library 
last week. One depicts a librarian read- 
ing reference books to learn the approved 
treatment for officious book agents. An- 
other shows the librarian and her assist- 
ant seeking relief from the snores of a 
patron parked on two reading room 
chairs. Still another delineates the fair 
librarian hauling a heavy coal bucket 



while her assistant is endeavoring to find 
out why the stove smokes. 

There are eight or ten of these draw- 
ings in all. But we won't give the 
information on all of them. Perhaps 
when some one has learned how to do 
away with duties not commonly consid- 
ered necessary for a librarian, time will 
be found to frame the pictures and send 
them to one of the art centers for 
exhibition." 

In conclusion. I should leave these 
few words of advice with you : 

Get to know your newspaper editor or 
reporter personally. 

Give him the feeling that you are on 
the lookout for interesting items about 
the goings and comings of people. 

He'll regard this as a bit of co-opera- 
tion : and if he's a hard-boiled egg (to 
use a vulgar phrase) — he'll weaken when 
you show him a little co-operation. 

Present him occasionally with a little 
story of human interest character about 
the library. And hand him your statis- 
tical matter and lists of new books at 
intervals also. You'll find that this 
acquaintanceship and co-operation will 
serve to bring yourself and your libraiw 
more closely before his vision. And with 
the proper material and the frequent 
publication of stories you will have 
achieved exactly what you seek. Library 
publicity that will build for you a greater 
library, an institution more nearly serv- 
ing the entire community. 



-1990S 



266 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



FIRST LIBRARY TALK BY RADIO. 



By Edna Hewitt., Librarian, 

As Librarian, I talk mostly to book 
worms, but tonight I am having the new 
experience of talking to the so-called 
radio bug. This is indeed a new experi- 
ence to me as librarian, for never before 
has a librarian told of her wares over 
the radio, and it is also a new experience 
to the radio bug for never before has he 
"listened in" and heard of the county 
library system in California. 

The late James L. Gillis, former state 
librarian, is responsible for the county 
library system in California. Until 1S99, 
the state librarians had been appointed 
according to the customs of the times, 
for purely political reasons. The affairs 
of the office were administered without 
enthusiasm or desire for service to the 
people of the state. So when Mr. Gillis 
was appointed April 1, 1899, he ex- 
pressed his desire to make the State Li- 
brary a vehicle which could be used by 
every man, woman and child who was 
desirous of culture and self improve- 
ment. 

Many plans were considered, tried, 
and abandoned until finally the county 
system was developed. 

The county library plan was not to 
displace other instruments of book dis- 
tribution ; but first, to cover territory 
which could not otherwise be touched and 
secondly, where local conditions made it 
wise to bind together those institutions 
which through weakness were unable to 
accomplish their legitimate purposes. 

A county library is established by the 
Board of Supervisors for every person in 
the county and is maintained by a small 
tax rate. In Sutter county we pay 4 
cents on the $100. 

In order to reach the people in the 
rural districts we establish community 
branch libraries. A custodian is ap- 
pointed by the Supervisors to take charge 
of these branches and they are kept open 
certain hours each week. In Sutter 
county we have 10 of these community 
branch libraries. In some parts of the 
county where the population is so scat- 
tered we find it more advisable to place 
the community branch library in the 
school house. We have 15 branch 



Sutter County Free Library. 

libraries located in school houses for 
the people of the communities. There 
are 3689 branch libraries in the state. 

Any person living in a rural district 
who wishes a book on some special sub- 
ject may have it by asking the custodian 
at the nearest community branch library. 
If the book asked for does not happen to 
be at the branch library the custodian 
in charge sends to headquarters and asks 
the county librarian to send this particu- 
lar book to her branch. If the county 
librarian finds that this book is not in 
the county library she sends to the State 
Library. The State Library will either 
send the book or let the librarian know 
which libraries in the state have it. The 
book, when located, will be sent to the 
branch library for the person who re- 
quested it. Or if the person wants books 
on some subject and does not know of 
any late books written on that subject, 
if he will ask for books by giving the 
subject, the librarian will find out the 
best books and send them to him. The 
county pays all transportation charges 
on books in the county. The State Li- 
brary pays charges on all books sent from 
the State Library. So through the 
county library Mr Gillis' desire of serv- 
ing every man, woman and child in the 
state of California has been fulfilled. 

Last but not least are the benefits that 
the schools derive from county libraries. 
According to law each school is pro- 
vided with a small amount of money for 
library purposes. This amount can not 
be less than $25 per teacher. Sometimes 
$50 a teacher is apportioned. In the 
county library law, arrangement has been 
made whereby the schools may transfer 
their library funds to the county library. 
By doing this they pool their funds and 
the books may be purchased in large 
quantities. Buying in large quantities 
increases the purchasing power. Then 
too, the books are kept in a central place 
so that a school needing certain books 
may request them from library head- 
quarters. As soon as the school is 
through using a set of books it sends 
them back to headquarters. In that way 
several schools may use the same set of 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



RADIO AND HAWAIIAN NOTES. 



267 



books iii one year. In Sutter county 
our largest school transferred to the 
county library this year $400. This same 
school has received this year $1200 
worth of service by belonging to the 
county library. Besides books, the county 
library furnishes maps, globes, charts, 
pictures and music records. Every school 
in Sutter county belongs to the county 
library with the exception of one high 
school. Forty-four counties in the state 
have established county libraries and 
2101 school districts in California have 
contracted for service with these county 
libraries. 



A county library is just what the 
people in a county make it. If the 
people are wide awake and progressive 
they will use the county library to the 
limit. It can be used not only for cul- 
ture and self improvement, but the best 
books written on any line of business 
may be obtained. 

This experience of talking to you so- 
called radio bugs has been very interest- 
ing to me and I sincerely hope that I 
have not tired you out with the story 
that we bookworms love to tell. 



EXCERPTS FROM LETTER OF JUNE 17, 1922, FROM MISS 

MARION MORSE, LIBRARIAN, MAUI COUNTY 

FREE LIBRARY, TERRITORY OF HAWAII. 



The announcement I received of C. 
L. A. made me feel almost homesick. 
This is the first meeting I have missed 
in five years. It hardly seems possible 
that I can have been away from Cali- 
fornia so long. It has been a busy nine 
months, but now having weathered the 
stormy period of organization, it looks as 
if it ought to be easy sailing. We are 
so far away from everything here that 
it takes much longer than it would in the 
states. 

It was February before we were able 
to move into our own building. Even 
then most of our furniture was lacking. 
The furniture arrived in April. The 
front porch was put on in May so now 
we are just about fixed up. 

The ladies' rest room was fitted up by 
the Maui Woman's Club for the use of 
the out-of-town people particularly. It 
is very attractive with its pictures and 
wicker furniture. The office has art 
metal furniture, desk, typewriter table, 
filing cabinet and wall shelves. Metal is 
cool and does not appeal to the many 
species of hungry bugs we have in this 
country. The librarian's quarters are 
located in the library building. 

We have necessarily been slow in ex- 
tending the library work. We had to get 
the books first and since they had to 



come from the mainland, delays were 
inevitable. The Wailuku branch has 
been open all the time and seems quite 
popular. We are just a block from the 
grammar school and it is a sight to see 
the children flock in after school in the 
afternoon. They just swarm all over the 
place. Our adult borrowers come from 
all over the island. Distances are not so 
great, roads are pretty good and almost 
all of them have their own machines. 
The adult borrowers are practically all 
white while the children are of- every 
shade and color, yellow predominating. 

This past month I have started in with 
the branch work. It is great sport visit- 
ing some of the more remote places. I 
have tried everything but an outrigger 
canoe so far and give me time and I 
shall probably make visits in one of 
them. For motion the sampan has the 
first prize but even that doesn't make 
me sick. 

I had a very interesting trip over to 
Molokai, usually known as the Leper 
Isle. They have six schools over there. 
Most of the population is Hawaiian and 
how they can sing ! They knew I was 
coming so most of them had prepared 
concerts for me and then decorated me 
with quantities of wonderful flower leis. 
I almost felt like a royal princess. 



268 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES. 



«Z' U 







33* N. _ 

/«' Oiarftsnn, SX. 



vol. 17, no. 3] LIST OF COUNTY free libraries. 



269 



LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES. 

Statistics of July 1, 1921. 



County 



Income 
1920-1921* 



Books, 
etc. 



ES'-'g 



B-S-" < 



otg . 



gS§ 



Alameda 

Amador 

Butte 

Colusa 

Contra Costa- 
Fresno 

Glenn 

Humboldt 

Imperial 

Inyo - - 

Kern ____ 

Kings . 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Madera 

Merced 

Modoe 

Monterey 

Napa 

Orange 

Flumas 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino. 

San Diego 

San Joaquin 

San Luis Obispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara.. 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 

44 



Miss Mary Barmby 

Miss Frances M. Burket 

§Miss Blanche Chalfant 

Mrs Dorothy O. Worden 

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck 

Miss Sarah E. McCardle 

Miss Maude Middleton 

Miss Ida M. Reagan 

Mrs Thomas B. Beeman 

Miss Anne Margrave 

Mrs Julia G. Babcock 

Miss Eleanore Kyle 

Miss Lenala Martin 

Miss Celia Gleason 

Miss Julia Steffa 

Miss Winifred H. Bigley 

Miss Anna L. Williams 

Miss Anne Hadden 

Miss Estella DeFord 

Miss Margaret Livingston- 
Miss Carmelita Duff 

Miss Lillian L. Dickson 

Miss Cornelia D. Provines 

Mrs Ora M. Regnart 

Miss Caroline S. Waters 

Miss Eleanor Hitt 

H. 0. Parkinson 

Miss Flo A. Gantz 

Miss Edna Holroyd 

Mrs Frances B. Linn 

Miss Stella Huntington 

Miss Minerva H. Waterman. 

Not started 

Miss Thelma Brackett 

Miss Clara B. Dills 

Not started 

Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn... 

Miss Edna J. Hewitt 

Miss Elizabeth Stevens . 

Miss Lila G. Dobell 

Miss Gretchen Flower 

Miss Helen Rowland 

Miss Elizabeth R. Topping. 
Miss Nancy C. Laugenour__ 



Sept. 26 
June 2 
Sept. 3 
June 8 
July 21 
Mar. 12 
April 8 
May 12 
Feb. 6 
Sept. 15 
Nov. 16 
June 
Sept. 
Sept. 
May 
June 
July 
April 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
July 14 
April 5 
Mar. 7 
July 6 
Sept. 5 
Feb. 16. 
July 20 
Oct. 13 
May 10. 
June 7 
April 6 
May 11 
Aug. 14 
May 9 
Aug. 8 
Sept. 8 
June 10 
July 3 
April 9 
July 12. 



1910 
1919 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1910 
1914 
1914 
1912 
1913 
1910 
1912 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1916 
1919 
1915 
1911 
1908 
1918 
1913 
1912 
1910 
1915 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1916 
1917 
1915 
1914 
1916 
1911 
1917 
1916 
1916 
1910 
1917 
1915 
1910 



$34,400 00 

5,124 57 
18,327 78 

9,522 25 
40,783 24 
106,515 10 
14,068 10 
25,041 16 
11,256 65 

8,065 56 
61,979 17 
21,044 24 

9,317 85 
174,890 55 
24,159 13 
28,114 77 

3,295 45 
17,647 20 
10,437 50 



7,365 43 
11,540 76 
19,308 74 

7,070 00 
24,591 83 
27.844 68 
18,369 75 
13,243 68 

8.012 70 
15,862 37 
23,035 71 

6,890 30 



12,917 69 
16,571 59 



22,135 52 
10.193 24 
8,272 69 
4,971 30 
30,729 6-2 
7,890 17 
21,916 88 
15,737 98 



73,120 
4,441 
38,362 
25,395 
78,981 

207,785 
20,499 
44,604 
43,971 
16,417 

106,125 
65,275 
21,340 

292,944 
52,083 

a51,809 
6,407 
43,728 
6,805 



73 
20 
97 
54 
93 

198 
82 

150 
66 
44 

151 
69 
76 

317 
64 
74 
14 

149 
61 



19,314 



14,660 
11,317 
59,577 
66,731 



17,013 
19.828 


56,986 





143 

75 
72 
52 
124 
100 
83 



46,542 
32,909 



37,313 
20,729 
21,410 
14,046 
66,925 
20,971 
33,567 
50,145 



52 
72 
56 
136 
54 
67 
79 



80 

41 

70 

36 

60 

170 

'47 

111 

50 

31 

114 

48 

44 

204 

50 

76 



121 
95 
93 
40 
74 
90 
57 



67 
35 
62 
23 
139 
32 



O 1,'08-D 9,'19 $958,462 90 al,S10,074 3 



2,920 



29 
8 
61 
30 
51 

135 
40 
89 
52 
28 
88 
38 
42 

132 
47 
55 
13 
64 
38 

"31 
37 
£9 

35 
67 
80 
30 
58- 
24 
60 
75 
48 



*The income as given does not include balance in fund July 1, 1920. 
§Appointed librarian April 6, 1922. 



270 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 

Only those California libraries are listed for which there were news items. For 
complete list of libraries, see Annual Statistics Number, October, 1921. 



CALIFORNIA, 

Area, 158,297 sq. miles. 

Second in size among the states. 

Population, 3,426,536. 

Assessed valuation, $4,555,445,447. 

Number of counties, 58. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY. 

(Third Class.) 

County seat, Oakland. 
Area, 840 sq. mi. Pop. 344,127. 
Assessed valuation $314,044,299 (tax- 
able for county $274,852,032). 

Alameda Co. Free Library, Oak- 
land. 'Miss Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

The Antone school became a part of 
the Alameda County Library in April. 
This leaves but four elementary rural 
schools unserved by the county library. 
The four outside the service are one- 
teacher schools. 

In May a small branch was opened in 
the east end of Albany. An attractive 
room in the new school building is the 
home of the branch. The attendant is 
Mrs McLaughlin and the name of the 
branch is Ramona. It is primarily a 
community branch. 

The county library, at the suggestion of 
the Alameda County Board of Education, 
gladly worked with the board in rearrang- 
ing the reading list for the school manual. 
At the suggestion of the board, a short 
article about the county library was 
written for the new manual. 

Mary Barmby, Lib'n. 

Alameda. 

§|| Alameda Free Public Library. 
Mrs Marcella H. Krauth, Lib'n. 

A different location for the Webster 
Street Branch Library is contemplated. 
A lease of the Regent Theater on Web- 
ster street, a block south of the present 
location of the reading room, has been 
signed to cover a number of years and 
as soon as the necessary changes are 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 

Alameda — Continued. 

made the library will be moved into its 
new quarters. The plan is to make it 
strictly up to date in every particular. 
Dr Miller, whose term of office as 
library trustee expired in April, was 
reappointed by the Mayor for a term of 
five years. Dr Miller was also re- 
elected President of the Library Board. 
Marcella H. Krauth, Lib'n. 

Antone School Dist. 

Antone School Dist. Branch, 
Alameda Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished iu April, 1922. 

Berkeley. 

||§Berkeley [Free] Public Library. 
Carlton B. Joeckel, Lib'n. 

The City Council has fixed the tax 
rate for library purposes for the fiscal 
year 1922-23 at 14 cents on the $100. 
The income from 9 cents will go for 
operating expenses and the income from 
the remaining 5 cents will go into a 
special building fund. This special 5-cent 
rate will produce about $32,000 a year. 
It is hoped that this appropriation will 
be continued in ensuing years, which will 
make possible the building up of a real 
library system in Berkeley. The Board 
of Library Trustees will begin at once 
to study the question of plans for an 
addition to the main library and it may 
be possible to make a beginning in the 
course of the next year. 

C. B. Joeckel, Lib'n. 

Pacific School of Religion Library. 
Chas. Sumner Nash, Pres. Geo. T. Tol- 
son, Lib'n. 

The Pacific School of Religion will 
have a $100,000 library building, a gift 
from Charles Holbrook of San Francisco. 
The board of trustees of the school 
formally accepted the gift this week. 
Architects are at work on plans for the 



VOl. 17, no. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



271 



ALAMEDA CO.— Continued. 
Berkeley — Continued. 

new building, which will be the first unit 
in a new school group to be erected on 
the present property on Atherton street 
near Allston way. — Oakland Tribune, 
Ap 29. 

Oakland. 

§||Oakxand Feee [Public] Library. 
Chas. S. Greene, Lib'n. 

The Oakland Art Gallery held its first 
annual exhibition from June 4 to July 9. 
The exhibition consists largely of paint- 
ings by artists whose work is seldom 
seen in this part of the state. This is 
due to eminent southern artists having 
been specially invited to exhibit, in the 
hope of showing our public the best work 
that is being done in other parts of the 
West, as well as locally. 

The Kendall property, purchased by 
the city for museum purposes, has been 
formally turned over to the library 
department, and for the present is desig- 
nated as the Museum Annex. The work 
on the Snow African Collection, which 
Mr Henry A. Snow, has deeded to the 
city, has been transferred to the Annex, 
where under the supervision of Mr Snow, 
who is giving his whole time to this work, 
progress is being made in getting the 
material ready for exhibition. Mr Snow 
has also given many talks. The council 
has passed a resolution formally agreeing 
to provide a suitable fireproof building 
for the collection within the next two 
years. 

A brief training class was held May 19 
to June 3 for those who took the Sub- 
stitute Examination held by the Civil 
Service Board April 13. The various 
department heads lectured on the work 
of their departments, and there was prac- 
tice work for the students. Miss Nettie 
V. Morgan of the Piedmont Avenue 
Branch was in charge. 

Miss Jane M. Fenton, first assistant in 
the Reference Department, is the library's 
representative at the meeting of the 
American Library Association in Detroit. 
Miss Fenton will go on as far as New 
York City, spending part of her time in 
visiting other libraries. 



ALAMEDA CO. — Continued. 
Oakland — Continued. 

The meeting of the California Library 
Association at Coronado was attended 
by several of the staff — the librarian ; 
Miss Florence E. Browne, Chief of the 
Children's Department ; Misses Louise 
Schaufler, Isabel Curtis and Emma 
Davies, branch librarians ; Misses Marie 
Bunce, Josephine Jenkinson, Veronica 
Sexton and Genevieve O. Weaver, 
assistants. 

Miss Alice McComb, assistant at 
Alden Branch, resigned from her position 
April 15, to be married to Mr Pacie 
Ripple of New York City. 

The contract for binding for the fiscal 
year beginning July 1, 1922, was awarded 
to the Foster and Futernick Company, 
it being the only bidder. 

Chas. S. Greene, Lib'n. 

Ramona. 

Ramona Branch, Alameda Co. Free 
Library, was established in May, 1922. 

ALPINE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-eighth class.) 

County seat, Markleeville. 
Area, 575 sq. mi. Pop. 243. 
Assessed valuation $812,937 (taxable 
for county $717,061). 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

(Forty-fifth class.) 

County seat, Jackson. 
Area, 568 sq. mi. Pop. 7793. 
Assessed valuation $6,925,588 (taxable 
for county $5,965,035). 

Amador Co. Free Library, Jackson. 
Miss Frances M. Burket, Lib'n. 

During the quarter, branches were 
established in the following school dis- 
tricts : Carbondale, Enterprise, Middle 
Bar and Union. Carbondale will give 
community service and, during the sum- 
mer months, Mrs Martin will have charge 
of the books. Middle Bar is a joint 
school district, part being in Amador 
and part in Calaveras county. The 



272 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



AMADOR CO.— Continued. 

Board of Supervisors of Calaveras county 
voted to turn over the library fund of 
that district to this library, thereby 
rendering possible full library service for 
Middle Bar school. 

The main office of the county library 
has been moved to temporary quarters, 
as the Woman's Club of Jackson is 
remodeling its building. This has been 
the home of the library since its establish- 
ment, and upon its completion will again 
house the library for at least a year. 

Frances M. Burket, Lib'n. 

Carbondale School Dist. 

Carbondale School Dist. Branch, 
Amador Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

Enterprise School Dist. 

Enterprise School Dist. Branch. 
Amador Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

Middle Bar School Dist. 

Middle Bar School Dist. Branch, 
Amador Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

Union School Dist. 

Union School Dist. Branch, 
Amador Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

(Twenty-second class.) 

County seat, Oroville. 
Area, 1764 sq. mi. Pop. 30,030. 
Assessed valuation $43,305,078 (taxable 
for county $35,863,709). 

Butte Co. Free Library, Oroville. 
Miss Blanche Chalfant, Lib'n. 

Miss Blanche Chalfant was appointed 
County Librarian of Butte county April 6 
by the Board of Supervisors. Miss Chal- 
fant has been the assistant librarian of 
the Yolo County Free Library the past 
year. She had formerly been county 
librarian in, first, Plumas county, then 
Inyo county. 



CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

(Forty-ninth class.) 

County seat, San Andreas. 
Area, 990 sq. mi. Pop. 6183. 
Assessed valuation $8.5S7,433 (taxable 
for county $7,618,065) . 



COLUSA COUNTY. 

(Forty-second class.) 

County seat, Colusa. 
Area, 1080 sq. mi. Pop. 9290. 
Assessed valuation $24,200,735 (taxable 
for county $20,639,483) . 

Colusa Co. Free Library, Colusa. 
Mrs Dorothy C. Worden, Lib*n. 

The new county library signs have 
arrived — twelve of them — and we are 
proud to display them at our branches 
and community branches in schools. We 
are planning an exhibit at the State Fair 
which is also to include our sign. 

The County Librarian and assistant, 
Ella Packer, attended the district meeting 
at Marysville in April. 

Inventory of the branches has been 
completed. The mountain branches at 
Ladoga, Stonyford, Antelope and Black 
Mountain were visited during the quarter 
as well as most of the other branches. 

Community service is being given dur- 
ing the vacation in the Antelope, Black 
Mountain and Leesville school districts 
by Miss Alice Callaghan, Mrs Mathilda 
Gordon and Mrs M. J. Keegan, respec- 
tively. Mrs Roy Rice has succeeded 
Mrs McGahan as custodian at Stonyford, 
as Mrs McGahan is leaving for Wood- 
land. The Grimes Branch is now located 
in the telephone office there and is open 
every afternoon with Miss Marian 
Weilander as custodian. 

Dorothy C. Worden, Lib'n. 

Antelope School Dist. (P. O. Sites). 

Antelope Branch. Colusa Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



VOl. 17, 110. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



273 



COLUSA CO.— Continued. 
Black Mountain School Dist. 

(P. O. Sites). 

Black Mountain Branch, Colusa 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Grimes, 

Grimes Branch, Colusa Co. Fref 
Library. 

See note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Leesville. 

Leesville Branch, Colusa Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. • 

Stonyford. 

Stonyforo Branch, Colusa Co. Free 
Library. 

Sec note under Colusa Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

(Thirteenth class.) 

County seat, Martinez. 
Area. 750 sq. mi. Pop, 53,889. 
Assessed valuation $87,374,877 (tax- 
able for county .$79,038,745). 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-fourth class.) 

County seat. Crescent city. 
Area. 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 2759. 
Assessed valuation $9,453,336 (taxable 
for county $9,418,286). 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

(Forty-eighth class.) 

County seat. Placerville. 
Area, 1891 sq. mi. Pop. 0426. 
Assessed valuation $11,805,740 (tax- 
able for county $10,251,830). 



FRESNO COUNTY. 

(Fourth class.) 

County seat. Fresno. 
Area, 5696 sq. mi. Pop. 128,779. 
Assessed valuation $188,332,264 (lax- 
able for county $161,432,260). 

GLENN COUNTY. 

(Thirty-eighth class.) 

County seat, Willows. 
Area, 1460 sq. mi. Pop. 11,853. 
Assessed valuation $27,603,956 (tax- 
able for county $23,866,418). 

Glenn Co. Free Library, Willows. 
Miss Maude Middleton, Lib'n. 

A wild flower exhibit was held April 
15 at the County Library; the specimens, 
forty in number, were sent in by the 
school children from all parts of the 
county. This made a representative 
exhibit of the flora of the county. 

Miss Martha June Coleman was 
appointed first assistant June 1. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall spent two 
days visiting schools and branches with 
the County Librarian. 

Maude Middleton, Lib'n. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

(Twentieth class.) 

County seat, Eureka. 
Area, 3507 sq. mi. Pop. 37,413. 
Assessed valuation $42,560,904 (tax- 
able for county $38,969,254). 

Humboldt Co. Free Library, Eureka. 
Miss Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

During the quarter branches were es- 
tablished in the Capetown and Cenler- 
ville school districts. 

Ida M. Reagan, Lib'n. 

Areata. 

Humboldt State Teachers College 
Library and Branch, Humboldt Co. 
Free Library. N. B. Van Matre, Pres. 
Miss Ruth Fleming, Lib'n. 

The library has recently acquired some 
new furniture, which adds very much 
to its attractiveness. Tables, six in num- 
ber, have been made to order, of oak, in 
light finish to match the woodwork. 



274 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



HUMBOLDT CO.— Continued. 

Areata — Continued. 

They are about ten feet long by three 
iu width, accommodating ten students 
each. Some of the old tables are being 
refinished and adapted to use as refer- 
ence and dictionary tables, and others 
are to be shortened and used in a chil- 
dren's corner. A new wingshape desk 
has also been designed, and especially 
made and finished like the new tables. 
An open picture-file and a small news- 
paper rack complete the new equipment. 
All students are required to do a cer- 
tain amount of magazine reading every 
month, making brief written reports to 
the librarian, on slips of uniform size 
which are provided, and filed by the 
students in a box kept on the desk for 
that purpose. Sometimes a list of worth- 
while articles is posted, from which selec- 
tion is made ; and at other times the 
choice is left entirely to the student. In 
a vote taken recently on this matter, the 
majority seemed to favor freedom of 
choice ; but in many cases the chief 
reason given was that it was not always 
easy to get hold of the magazines on the 
selected list, in their leisure time. 

Ruth Fleming, Lib'n. 

Capetown. 

Capetown School Dist. Branch, 
Humboldt Co. Feee Library, was estab- 
lished June 22, 1922. 

Centerville School Dist. 

(P. O. Ferndale). 

Centerville School Dist. Branch, 
Humboldt Co. Free Library, was 
established May 3, 1922. 

IMPERIAL COUNTY. 

(Seventeenth class.) 

County seat, El Centro. 
Area, 4316 sq. mi. Pop. 43,383. 
Assessed valuation $47,510,133 (tax- 
able for county $40,580,941). 

Imperial Co. Free Library, El Cen- 
tro. Mrs Thomas B. Beeman, Lib'n. 

A custodian's meeting was held at 
Headquarters March 31. The custodians 
were very enthusiastic over the results of 
the meeting. A talk was given by the 



IMPERIAL CO.— Continued. 

County Librarian on better service, more 
co-operation and suggestions were given 
on detailed service. These meetings are 
always inspiring not only to the custo- 
dians but also to the County Librarian 
and her assistants. 

April 1, the County Librarian was 
invited to speak at the convention of the 
County Federation of Clubs. There was 
a large attendance present and the 
County Librarian stressed the point of 
co-operation between the clubs and the 
County Librarian. She gave instances 
of the ways in which the County Library 
could help the clubs and told of the won- 
derful service available from the State 
Library. She also spoke of the picture 
collection and of the available loans from 
the Print Makers Association which the 
County Library has just joined. The 
suggestion was also made to each new 
President appointed for each club in the 
Valley that a yearbook and program be 
sent to the County Librarian and that 
the County Librarian would see that 
every person taking part on their pro- 
grams would be communicated Avith in 
ample time, offering assistance in the 
way of books and pictures for their 
special programs. This suggestion was 
received with enthusiasm. 

Mrs Bertha Gates, Assistant Libra- 
rian, resigned April 1 as she was leaving 
the Valley. Miss Gladys Nietmann has 
been appointed to fill the vacancy. Miss 
Nietmann took her library training in 
the San Diego Public Library under Miss 
Warren and has been working in the 
San Diego Public Library for nearly a 
year. She comes well recommended 
from Miss Warren. 

Owing to the growth of the town of 
Calipatria and the increase in demands 
from the County Library, we have had 
to change the deposit station which we 
had there to a branch library with a 
reading room. Mrs 0. B. Crary is our 
custodian there now. 

Mrs Thos. B. Beeman, Lib'n. 

Calipatria. 

Calipatria Branch, Imperial Co 
Free Library. 

See note under Imperial Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



VOl. 17, no. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



275 



INYO COUNTY. 

(Forty-seventh class.) 

County seat, Independence. 
Area, 10,224 sq. mi. Pop. 7031. 
Assessed valuation $17,033,180 (tax- 
able for county $10,623,319). 

Into Co. Free Library, Independ- 
ence. Miss Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

The branch at Laws, discontinued four 
years ago for lack of a custodian, and 
was re-established June 5. The response 
of the people has been immediate and 
eager, several persons promising to give 
magazines regularly, if the County Li- 
brary supplies others, and registration 
and circulation going merrily on. The 
branch is located in a general store, 
Mrs Carl Nellen, wife of the proprietor, 
being custodian. She is well equipped 
by training and personality for the work. 
Mr Nellen has built in the book-cases 
on one of his counters. 

One of the exhibits of the California 
Print Makers Society was held at Bishop 
during the month of April, through the 
co-operation of the library, the woman's 
clubs and the high school. Later it came 
to Independence under the same auspices. 
Here the county superintendent loaned 
her office for the display, since she 
expected to be at Bishop during the time. 
The high school took the opportunity to 
study briefly the various methods of 
print-making, and came by classes to 
examine the exhibit, as did the older 
classes of the grammar school. 

The County Librarian gave several 
periods, of instruction in the use of the 
library to the freshman class of the high 
school. Since the school is young and 
small, with very little library equipment, 
the County Library is used almost as an 
additional study hall by the pupils, and 
they get a constant practice in the in- 
struction given. 

We have found a way to make our 
discards, which still contain all theii 
reading matter, continue their usefulness 
a little longer. They are given to miners, 
campers and others making mountain 
trips where they do not wish to be 
responsible for books which must be 
returned. We say "Pass them on," and 
if there is anything left to pass, we are 



INYO CO.— Continued. 

sure they will do so. Magazines are also 
disposed of in this way, when they can 
be spared. 

A celebration of Shakespeare's birth- 
day was held in the County Library. 
The tables were given up to an exhibit 
of interesting editions and commentaries, 
a number of beautiful books being bor- 
rowed from the State Library, while the 
town and the County Library were also 
drawn on for both books and pictures. 
The room was further furnished forth 
with all the flowers available which could 
be labeled with the proper quotation, 
credit being given also to the garden 
drawn on. Since we have Wells as 
authority that so many flowers are no 
longer flowers, but quotations from 
Shakespeare, we felt this most appro- 
priate. The high school and a local 
quartet gave a short and very enjoyable 
program. Anne Margrave, Lib'n. 

Laws. 

Laws Branch, Into Co. Free Li- 
brary, was re-established June 5, 1922. 



KERN COUNTY. 

(Twelfth class.) 

County seat, Bakersfield. 
Area, 8159 sq. mi. Pop. 54,843. 
Assessed valuation $186,312,776 (tax- 
able for county $163,211,137). 

Kern Co. Free Librart, Bakersfield. 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock, Lib'n. 

Supervisor Ira M. Williams attended 
the convention of the American Library 
Association in Detroit, June 26 to July 
1. He represented the Kern County Li- 
brary there and has come back firmly 
believing that the best county libraries 
in the United States are in California. — 
San Francisco Journal, Jl 10 

The Wasco Branch Library will be 
dedicated on Thursday, June 29. The 
exercises will be held in the new library 
building, which is of the mission style, 
made of white stucco and with a red tile 
roof. — Wasco News, Je 28 

Excavation for the new branch library 
building at Maricopa has been completed 



276 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



KERN CO.— Continued. 

and active construction work started by 
Contractor George Isaacs. The building 
will represent a cost of $9,150. The 
plans call for brick walls with cement 
cornices and trimmings and a tile roof. 
— Bakersfield Californian, Je 16 

Deeds to two lots, which will be used 
as a site for the new branch library at 
McKittrick, have been filed with the 
county clerk. The funds for the project 
were raised by popular subscription and 
the property purchased from the South- 
ern Pacific Land Company. The deeds 
will be turned over to the Kern County 
Library Board which had promised this 
town a building if it would buy the site. 
Mrs Julia G. Babcock, County Librarian, 
is making provision for the building in 
next year's budget. — Fresno Republican. 
Je 20 

Bakersfield. 

§Beale Memorial [Free Public] Li- 
brary. Mrs Miriam C. Post, Lib'n. 

Miss Sarah E. Bedinger, librarian for 
the past twenty-two years, resigned on 
May 1 and was made Librarian Emer- 
itus. Miriam Colcord Post, California 
State Library School '14, was appointed 
librarian. Mrs Post was an assistant on 
the staff during April. 

Early in May the library joined with 
the Kern County Free Library in two 
exhibits, one at the Show of the Bakers- 
field Flower and Garden Club, the other 
at the Festival of Nations under the 
auspices of the schools. 

Mrs Post attended the C. L. A. Con- 
vention at Coronado in June. Miss Jes- 
sie Hendsch, an assistant in the East 
Bakersfield Branch Library, was granted 
a six weeks' leave of absence to attend 
the Riverside Library Summer Training 
School. 

Miriam Colcord Post, Lib'n. 

McKittrick. 

McKittrick Branch, Keen Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Kern Co. Free Library. 



Maricopa. 
;ranch, B 

See note under Kern Co. Free Library. 



Maricopa Branch, Kern Co. Free 
Library. 



KERN CO.— Continued. 

Wasco. 

Wasco Branch, Kern Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Kern Co. Free Library. 



KINGS COUNTY. 

(Twenty-ninth class.) 

County seat, Hanford. 
Area, 1373 sq. mi. Pop. 22,031. 
Assessed valuation $28,206,785 (taxable 
for county $24,175,435). 

LAKE COUNTY. 

(Fifty-first class.) 

County seat, Lakeport. 
Area, 1332 sq. mi. Pop. 5402. 
Assessed valuation $6,755,820 (taxable 
for county $6,730,640) . 

LASSEN COUNTY. 

(Forty-fourth class.) 

County seat, Susanville. 
Area, 4750 sq. mi. Pop. 8507. 
Assessed valuation $16,639,784 (taxable 
for county $12,778,834). 

Lassen Co. Free Library, Susan- 
ville. Miss Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

The librarian made visits to the follow- 
ing school branches, taking the library 
phonograph with her : Bridgeport. John- 
stonville, and Riverside. Lassen County 
Hospital was also visited. 

Lenala A. Martin, Lib'n. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY. 

(First class.) 

County seat, Los Angeles. 
Area, 3880 sq. mi. Pop. 936,438. 
Assessed valuation $1,414,564,717 (tax- 
able for county $1,175,262,858). 

Alhambra. 

Alhambra [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Artena M. Chapin, Lib'n. 

Some interesting lectures were held in 
the lecture room of the library this 
spring. In April Miss Gertrude Darlow, 



vol. 17, 110. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



277 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

A I ham bra — Continued. 

of the General Literature Department of 
the Los Angeles Public Library, gave a 
talk on "Poetry" and in June another on 
"Essays." In May Miss Anna Beckley, 
of the Marlborough School for Girls, 
talked on "Cathedrals.*' illustrating it 
with photographs. 

Mrs Frances B. Schneider, Chairman 
of Educational Work for the Los Angeles 
Audubon Society, gave an illustrated 
talk on Birds of Southern California and 
especially of this region. 

Aetena M. Chapin, Lib'n. 

Long Beach. 

§||Long Beach [Feee] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Zaidee Brown, Lib'n. 

Miss Zaidee Brown, Librarian of the 
Long Beach Public Library, has been 
granted a year's leave of absence, with- 
out pay, dating from May 30. Miss 
Brown told the city council that she 
desired to take special work in New 
York City and to spend some time in 
travel and rest. Mrs Theodora R. 
Brewitt. assistant librarian and teacher 
of the Long Beach Library Training 
School, will act as librarian in Miss 
Brown's absence. — 'Long Beach Press, 
Ap 4 

Los Angeles. 

t§Los Angeles [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Everett R. Perry, Lib'n. 

Guy E. Marion, the man who selected 
all motion pictures for American troops 
in Europe and Siberia during the war, 
entered on his duties today as assistant 
librarian of the Los Angeles Public Li- 
brary. He will particularly devote his 
energies to organizing business libraries 
for private corporations and associations. 
Mr Marion is a graduate of Tufts Col- 
lege with the class of 1908. He estab- 
lished the first private industrial library 
in the country, that of the American 
Brass Company. — Los Angeles Express. 
Jl ] 

Barlow Medical Library. Dr Wil- 
liam Duffield, Pres. Mrs Ida D. Fellows, 
Lib'n. 

Doctors in the surrounding cities are 
learning to appreciate the desirability 



LOS ANGELES CO. — Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued. 

of membership in the Association as it 
furnishes them quick service in research 
work. 

The library has always extended the 
usual library courtesies to the University 
of California and the L T niversity of 
Southern California, but the past year 
the privilege has been used by medical 
and pre-medical students more than in 
previous years. 

There has been a constant demand that 
the library be opened in the evenings. 
This has been made possible now for two 
evenings in the week through the gener- 
osity of Dr Barlow, and the library is 
open on Monday and Friday evenings 
from seven to nine o'clock. 

Dr Edith Gould Fosnes, formerly of 
St. Paul, is assisting with the evening 
work, as well as part time during the 
absence of Mrs Fellows, who is taking 
a few months' vacation in the east. 
Mary E. Irish, Assistant Lib'n. 

Barlow Sanatorium Library. 

The dedication ceremonies incident to 
the presentation of the Los Angeles Opti- 
mists' Club Library to the Barlow Sana- 
torium occurred May 6 at 2 p.m. The 
building, of Spanish type of architecture, 
is constructed of monolithic hollow rein- 
forced concrete walls, and cost about 
$12,000. The institution's need of a 
library building was recognized by the 
Optimists' Club a year ago, and plans 
were at once formulated for instituting 
the work and raising the funds. — Los 
Angeles Times, My 14 

California Society Sons of the 
Revolution ( Repository of the South- 
west) and California Society of 
Colonial Wars Library. Pierson W. 
Banning, Vice Pres. Willis Milnor Dixon, 
Lib'n. 

There have been many valuable addi- 
tions made to the library within the 
past few months. The nationally known 
private collection of the late Willard 
Atherton Nichols of Redlands, has been 
presented to the library. Many individ- 
ual presentations have been made this 
year of valuable sets of books or single 
volumes to complete certain sets, as well 



278 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued. 

as many special publications. Also we 
have been able to complete various sets 
of historical and genealogical magazines. 
These are being bound and placed on the 
shelves where they are available to those 
who wish to use them. 

We have been fortunate in receiving 
from the South a large number of books, 
magazines, pamphlets and other historical 
matter which adds materially to the 
value of our library. This material from 
the South continues to come in from 
week to week and is making the South- 
ern section of our library most valuable. 

During the winter the library rooms 
were especially well filled. The register 
of visitors showed names from nearly 
every state in the Union. 

Ruth Moore, Office Manager. 

Occidental College and Academy 
Library. Dr Remsen D. Bird, Pres. 

Architects Myron Hunt and H. C. 
Chambers have been selected by the execu- 
tive board of Occidental College to pre- 
pare plans for the new library building 
which will be erected on the campus at 
a cost of approximately $100,000. 
Money for the new structure, which is 
to be a memorial to Mrs E. P. Clapp, 
was given several weeks ago by an un- 
known donor. Dr Bird announced that 
the new structure will incorporate sev- 
eral features used in the library at 
Brown University. It is to conform in 
style of architecture to the existing 
buildings. — Los Angeles Examiner, My 
23 

Security Trust and Savings Bank 
Library. Mrs Vivian G. Smith, Lib'n. 

The Special Libraries Association of 
Southern California has been formed for 
the purpose of promoting and extending 
the service of the special collections of 
books and business and statistical in- 
formation material, located in this local- 
ity. Mrs Vivian G. Smith, of the refer- 
ence library of the department of re- 
search and service of the Security Trust 
and Savings Bank, is president ; Miss 
Beth Pasko of the Southern California 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Los Angeles — Continued. 

Edison Company, vice president, and 
Mrs Mary E. Irish of the Barlow Medi- 
cal Library, secretary - treasurer. — -Los 
Los Angeles Times, My 7 

Southern Branch of the Univer- 
sity of California Library and De- 
posit Station, Los Angeles Public 
Library. Dr E. C. Moore, Prin. Eliza- 
beth H. Fargo, Lib'n. 

Miss Sarah L. Patterson, M.A., Uni- 
versity of Chicago 190>7, has been ap- 
pointed to a position on the staff of 
the University of California Southern 
Branch Library. Miss Patterson was a 
member of the staff of the University of 
Chicago Library from 1906-1919, and 
was from 1920-1921 in the County De- 
partment of the Riverside Public Li- 
brary. Miss Daisy Lake, who has been 
a member of the staff since 1915, re- 
signed her position in March to become 
librarian of the Glendale Union High 
School. Miss Elizabeth Boynton, of the 
Hollywood Library staff, has been ap- 
pointed to a position on the staff. Miss 
Boynton is well known in library work 
in Los Angeles. Miss Anna K. Fossler, 
formerly of the Library Association of 
Portland, Oregon, is now our Reference 
Librarian. 

Mrs Elizabeth P. Sturtevant, Assist- 
ant Librarian of the Southern Branch 
University of California, will again be 
Librarian for the University of Califor- 
nia Summer Session in Los Angeles. 
Miss Florence Baker, Librarian of Oak- 
land Technical High School, will be 
Assistant Librarian. 

Elizabeth H. Fargo, Lib'n. 



Pasadena. 

§||Pasadena [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Jeannette M. Drake, Lib'n. 

Miss Jeannette M. Drake, Librarian of 
the Pasadena Public Library, was elected 
vice-president of the California Library 
Association June 15 at San Diego, at the 
closing session of the twenty-seventh 
annual convention. Miss Drake did not 
attend the convention due to her month's 
trip East, during part of which time she 



Vol. 17, no. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



279 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Pasadena — Continued. 

will attend the American Library Asso- 
ciation meeting at Detroit. — Pasadena 
Star-News, Je 16 

Pasadena High School Library. 
W. P. Ewing, Prin. Miss Winifred 
Skinner, Lib'n. 

For the third successive year Miss 
Senter has loaned the library as many 
paintings and etchings as we could hang 
to advantage. Miss Senter seems to loan 
her pictures with the same spirit in 
which the library loans its books — with 
the desire for the greatest pleasure and 
enjoyment to the greatest number. 

Believing that the library has a re- 
sponsibility in fostering and developing 
art appreciation, the library has pur- 
chased a painting by Benjamin Brown 
with money collected for fines from over- 
due books — the second picture to be pur- 
chased in this way. 

The library attempts to encourage 
other forms of art as well — indicated by 
the May Day Floral Arrangement Con- 
test, the object being to demonstrate that 
the arrangement of flowers is an art 
which can be cultivated by the average 
person and practiced in the home, the 
effect depending on the taste and manner 
of treatment rather than on the flowers 
themselves. The interest taken by the 
boys was notable. 

The library staff was increased to 
three this year by the addition of Miss 
Florence Kratka, formerly librarian of 
the Elementary Schools Library. Miss 
Kratka has had charge of the textbook 
room this year and has also clone splen- 
did work on the catalog. Miss Waring's 
devoted service at the delivery desk has 
done much for the machinery as well as 
for the spirit of the library. 

Winifred Skinner, Lib'n. 

Pomona. 

§[|Pomona [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Sarah M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 

On June 10 the Junior Dramatic Club, 
an organization of young playwrights 
and actors, with some little aid from 
Mrs Robert Barnhizer of the library 
staff, presented in the library juvenile 
room Winifred Llope's little play, 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Pomona — Continued. 

"Friends in Bookland." As the title sug- 
gests, this is a play designed tu increase 
interest in good reading. The audience 
was so large that it could not all be 
accommodated, and on request the play 
was repeated in the auditorium of the 
Y M. C. A. building. The books whose 
characters appear in the play were ex- 
hibited with a poster inviting further 
acquaintance. The Circulation Chief 
reports that these books have been used 
more than before, probably as a conse-. 
quence of the play. The club was proud 
to be asked to put on this show for the 
library, and the library on its part con- 
siders any effort well repaid. 

Through the courtesy of the local 
Scout Master, the Boy Scouts have been 
acting as deputy library messengers to 
collect over-due books and charges for 
lost books. Every success scores certain 
points towards winning in their "Effici- 
ency Cont e s t." • The library is well 
pleased with the results already attained. 
Many long-departed book friends have 
rejoined our collection. It is the plan to 
continue this arrangement with the 
Scouts. 

The staff has secured contact with the 
library world by attendance at the San 
Antonio Library Club, by visiting days, 
by a visit of inspection from the Los 
Angeles Library School, and by the pres- 
ence of the librarian, Miss Bouton and 
Miss Healton at the California Library 
Association meeting in Coronado. 

Our only contribution to library 
science is the communication by Miss 
Harris to Public Libraries for June. In 
this she discusses our library reading 
hour as a means for self culture and an 
aid to public service. 

S. M. Jacobus, Lib'n. 



Santa Monica. 

§ Santa Monica [Free] Public Li- 
brary. Miss Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

The librarian and all members of the 
staff received an increase in salary of 
$10 beginning the first of July. 

With other activities the library is 
trying to help our needy ex-service men 



280 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



LOS ANGELES CO.— Continued. 

Santa Monica — Continued. 

and their families. A box of tin foil col- 
lected in the library sold for several dol- 
lars the other day. The little box kept 
on our checking desk is the recipient of 
amounts from a penny to one dollar and 
is a help toward paying for a week's 
grocery bill or perhaps a pair of shoes. 
A rummage sale is now being planned 
and the library is one of the centers for 
collections. Wearing apparel suitable 
for men is reserved for quick call for 
clothes. 

Elfie A. Mosse, Lib'n. 

MADERA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-seventh class.) 

County seat, Madera. 
Area, 2140 sq. mi. Pop. 12,203. 
Assessed valuation $22,465,890 (tax- 
able for county $19,098,855). 

Madera Co. Free Library, Madera. 
Miss Julia Steffa, Lib'n. 

The Madera County Free Library en- 
tered a decorated automobile in the 
parade July 4 and won the first prize 
which was offered for the best decorated 
machine. The car was completely cov- 
ered with fringed orange Dennison crepe 
paper and had the words Madera County 
Free Library in black crepe-covered let- 
ters fastened on to the sides. There was 
an arch over the front and over the back 
of the car and a canopy in the center 
which was made of a large orange 
fringed covered Japanese parasol. Two 
California County Free Library signs 
■were placed on either side of the wind- 
shield giving the appearance of side 
shields. The using of the orange and 
black to represent the colors of the li- 
brary sign met with much approval and 
the library staff felt very well pleased 
with its efforts. 

Julia Steffa, Lib'n. 

MARIN COUNTY. 

(Twenty-fifth class.) 

County seat, San Rafael. 
Area, 516 sq. mi. Pop. 27,342. 
Assessed valuation $20,66S,602 (tax- 
able for county $24,142,775). 



MARIN CO. — Continued. 
San Rafael. 

San Rafael [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Margaret McDonald, Lib'n. 

On Saturday afternoon May 20 the 
Third District of the California Library 
Association held a business meeting at the 
San Rafael Library. There were nine 
present. In the absence of the president, 
Miss Christal Fox, Miss Dills of Solano 
county presided. Miss Sybil Nye of Mill 
Valley was chosen nominator for the 
California Library Association, with 
Miss De Ford of Napa as alternate. 
Margaret McDonald, Lib'n. 

* Dominican College Library. Mother 
M. Louis, Prin. 

We have accessioned about 10,200 
books up to date. Since January, 1922, 
we have accessioned about 450 of which 
about 75 to 100 have been presented to 
the library as gifts. 

Sister M. Irene, Lib'n. 

*Hitchcock Military Academy Li- 
brary. Rev W. Sherer, Prin. 

On March 1 occurred the formal open- 
ing of the Hitchcock Military Academy 
Library, organized under the supervision 
of Mr James Land Ellis, head of the 
English department. The library is 
maintained by appropriation from the 
.school and by private gifts from patrons 
and alumni. 

An interesting feature of the library 
organization is that it is operated by 
six honor students, selected from the 
three highest classes. Under the general 
direction of the librarian, this staff exer- 
cises complete control over all matters 
connected with the library. The members 
of the staff are : Mr Ellis, librarian ; 
Raymond Nystrom, assistant librarian ; 
Erich Heuermann, David Reeves, James 
Graham, Roland Hilmer, and George 
Fontaine, clerks. 

The library opened with 328 volumes, 
but it will have doubled this number by 
the close of the present school year. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-third class.) 
County seat, Mariposa. 
Area, 15S0 sq. mi. Pop. 2775. 
Assessed valuation $5,286,380 (taxable 
for county $4,659,794). 



vol. 17, 110. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



281 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-eighth class.) 

County seat, Ukiah. 
Area, 3400 sq. mi. Pop. 24,116. 
Assessed valuation $29,886,210 (tax- 
able for county $26,437,472). 



MERCED COUNTY. 

(Twenty-seventh class.) 

County seat, Merced. 
Area, 1750 sq. mi. Pop. 24,579. 
Assessed valuation $34,S6S,653 (tax- 
able for county $29,443,474). 



MODOC COUNTY. 

(Fifty-second class.) 

County seat, Alturas. 
Area, 4097 sq. mi. Pop. 5425. 
Assessed valuation $8,450,770 (taxable 
for county $S,036,895) 

MONO COUNTY. 

(Fifty-seventh class.) 

County seat, Bridgeport. 
Area, 2796 sq. mi. Pop. 960. 
Assessed valuation $4,102,570 (taxable 
for county $2,140,815). 

MONTEREY COUNTY. 

( Twenty-fourth class. ) 

County seat, Salinas. 
Area, 3450 sq. mi. Pop. 27,980. 
Assessed valuation $46,316,112 (tax- 
able for county $39,916,474). 

Monterey Co. Free Library, Salinas. 
Miss Anne Hadden, Lib'n. 

Miss Anne Hadden started June 5 on 
a two months' tour of the East to in- 
clude New York, Boston and the Cana- 
dian Rockies. 

Mrs Irene Taylor Condon resigned 
May 1 to join her husband Mr Leland 
Condon at Gonzales, where they are mak- 
ing their home. Her place on the staff 
is filled by Miss Karen C. Jensen. 

During Miss Hadden's absence, Miss 
Marjorie Frink is employed as tempo- 
rary assistant. 
3—19908 



MONTEREY CO.— Continued. 

June 30 a branch was established at 
Jolon with Miss Sara Earl as custodian. 
Ellen B. Frink. 

Jolon. 

Jolon Branch, Monterey Co. Free 
Library, was established June 30, 1922. 

Spreckels. 

Spreckels Library Association Li- 
brary. E. Gold, Lib'n. 

On June 23 the board gave a benefit 
dance which proved quite successful. 
The membership has increased and the 
reading room is well patronized. 

E. Gold, Lib'n. 

NAPA COUNTY. 

(Thirty -first class.) 

County seat, Napa. 
Area, 800 sq. mi. Pop. 20,67S. 
Assessed valuation $24,695,190 (tax- 
able for county $21,532,590). 

Napa. 

Goodman [Free Public] Library. 
Miss Minnie C. Shreve, Lib'n. 

A study class has been organized by 
the staffs of our library and the County 
Library, purposing to meet twice a 
month for the study of general history 
and literature, informal book reviews 
and discussion. We are pleased that 
one of our trustees wishes to meet with 
us. 

The librarian and her assistant, Miss 
Boke, have each received a $25 raise in 
salary. 

The librarian attended the meeting of 
the Third District of the California Li- 
brary Association held at San Rafael 
recently. 

Minnie C. Shreve, Lib'n. 

NEVADA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-ninth class.) 

County seat, Nevada City. 
Area, 982 sq. mi. Pop. 10,850. 
Assessed valuation $9,305,221 (taxable 
for county $6,996,475). 



282 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jllty, 1922 



ORANGE COUNTY. 

(Tenth class.) 

County seat, Santa Ana. 
Area, 780 sq. mi. Pop. 61,375. 
Assessed valuation $128,569,920 (tax- 
able for county $115,729,185) 

Orange Co. Free Libbaby, Santa 
Ana. Miss Margaret Livingston, Lib'n. 

New branches were established during 
the quarter at the County Juvenile Home, 
La Habra Grammar School and Mod- 
jeska's. Summer branches are main- 
tained at El Toro and Fountain Valley 
schools. The County Library will fur- 
nish a collection of books for the Boy 
Scout Camp during July and August, to 
include good stories, handcraft, nature 
and travel books. Additional shelving 
has been placed and filled iu Seal Beach 
and Garden Grove branches. Brea is 
the first branch to pass the circulation 
mark of 1000 per month. It reported 
1240 for June. 

Schoolhouses are being built at Orange 
Thorpe and Harper-Fairview. The school 
libraries from those districts are to be 
cataloged and repaired before moving 
into the new buildings. The books from 
Orange Thorpe have already been brought 
to headquarters and accessioned. The 
trustees of Alamitos district have asked 
that their library be taken over this 
summer. 

Buena Park and Santa Ana High were 
the winning schools in the P. T. A. wild 
flower contest. The collections attracted 
much attention while displayed iu the 
County Library window before the 
judges' decision. 

May 5 was the date of the annual 
County Employees picnic, held at Orange 
County Park. Stunts, games and danc- 
ing furnished entertainment, and the 
occasion gave a chance for those of all 
departments to become better acquainted. 

An Indian exposition is being held in 
the Pomona College building at Laguna 
Beach, with lectures each week. Books 
about Indians, legends and tales have 
been sent to the branch ; also several 
records illustrative of Indian music. 

Several further additions have been 
made to our record collection by gift. 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 

Our hope of having 10,000 books by 
July first has been realized, the goal being 
passed June 20. 

By sharing, all members of the staff 
were able to attend part of the Califor- 
nia Library Association convention at 
Coronado and brought home many ideas 
to be talked over. Misses Dickson, But 
terfiekl, Anderson, Cage and Mrs Lyons 
of Riverside visited our library the last 
of May. 

Mabgabet Livingston, Lib'n. 

Orange Co. Juvenile Home Bbanch, 
Obange Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished during the quarter. 

Alamitos School Dist. 

(P. O. Garden Grove.) 

Alamitos School Dist. Branch, 
Orange Co. Feee Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Brea. 

Bbea Bbanch, Obange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

El Toro. 

El Toro School Dist. Branch, 
Orange Co. Free Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Fountain Valley School Dist. 

(P. O. Talbert.) 

Fountain Valley School Dist. 
Branch. Orange Co. Free Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Fullerton. 

Fullerton [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Minnie Maxwell, Lib'n. 

Fullerton has outgrown its public li- 
brary building ! Ever since 1914 the 
need of additional room has been dis- 
cussed at intervals, and then the matter 
postponed until some more convenient 



VOL 17, IIO. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



283 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 

Fullerton — Continued. 

time, some time when no other public 
improvement should be needed and there 
would be plenty of money for the 
library's needs. But we have decided 
that time will never come, and that the 
time has come when something must be 
done, so, at the June meeting of the Li- 
brary Trustees, a resoution was unani- 
mously adopted requesting the City 
Trustees to call a bond election for the 
purpose of raising $90,000 for an addi- 
tion to the present building. This 
amount is to cover the purchase of addi- 
tional ground and furnishings for the 
proposed building which would more than 
treble the present floor space. 

Following the adoption of these reso- 
lutions there was held at the library a 
joint meeting of the City and Library 
Trustees for the purpose of discussing 
the need for a new building. After a 
thorough discussion of the matter the 
city officials expressed themselves as 
heartily in sympathy and agreed to bring 
the question before the people as soon as 
it could be arranged. No definite time 
has been set as yet for the election but 
it seems probable that it will be early 
in September. 

We realize that the vacation season is 
not an ideal time to carry on a publicity 
campaign but we are doing everything 
possible and are quite encouraged by the 
apparent sympathy- and co-operation of 
our people so far. 

Minnie Maxwell, Lib'n. 

Garden Grove. 

Garden Grove Branch, Orange Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Harper-Fairview School Dist. 

(P. O. Costa Mesa). 

Harper - Fairview School Dist. 
Branch, Orange Co. Free Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 



ORANGE CO.— Continued. 
La Habra. 

La Habra Grammar School Dist. 
Branch, Orange Co. Free Library, 
was established June 6, 1922. 

Modjeska (P. O. El Toro). 

Modjeska Branch, Orange Co. Free 
Library, was established June 6, 1922. 

Orange Thorpe School Dist. 
(P. O. Anaheim, R. R.). 

Orange Thorpe School Dist. 
Branch, Orange Co. Free Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Seal Beach. 

Seal Beach Branch, Orange Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Orange Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

PLACER COUNTY. 

(Thirty -second class.) 

County seat. Auburn. 
Assessed valuation $1S,506,G24 (tax- 
able for county $12,842,330). 

Lincoln. 

Lincoln Free Public Library. Mrs 

Bertha C. Landis, Lib'n. 

An entertainment given in May for 
the purchase of books for the library 
gave us $217. 

Bertha C. Landis, Lib*n. 

Roseville. 

Roseville [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Georgiana R. Willits, Lib'n. 

The children are showing great appre- 
ciation for the books that have been 
placed for their especial benefit. A beau- 
tiful new floor covering has been laid, 
which was greatly needed, and we are 
hoping that the coming year will find us 
with more money for books and the 
building requirements less. 

Georgiana R. Willits, Lib'n. 



284 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 

(Fiftieth class.) 

County seat, Quincy. 
Area, 2361 sq. mi. Pop. 5681. 
Assessed valuation $21,220,247 (tax- 
able for county $15,262,308). 

Plumas Co. Free Libeaby, Quincy. 
Miss Carmelita Duff, Lib'n. 

Paxton Branch has been moved to the 
lobby of the Paxton Hotel. Mrs Frank 
Cota has been appointed custodian. After 
being closed during the winter, the 
branches in the logging camp of the 
Clover Valley Lumber Company and of 
the surveying crew of the California 
Highway Commission have reopened for 
the summer months. 

On April 28, the County Librarian 
gave a talk on children's reading to the 
Quincy Parent-Teacher Association. She 
also attended the series of field meets 
and play days held in various parts of 
the county during May. 

Caemelita Duff, Lib'n. 

California Highway Commission. 

California Highway Commission 
Branch, Plumas Co. Feee Libeaby. 

See note under Plumas Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Clover Valley Lumber Co. 

Clover Valley Lumbee Co. Branch, 
Plumas Co. Feee Libeaby. 

See note under Plumas Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Paxton. 

Paxton Branch, Plumas Co. Free 
Libeaby. 

See note under Plumas Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY. 

(Fifteenth class.) 

County seat, Riverside. 
Area, 7008 sq. mi. Pop. 50,207. 
Assessed valuation $50,837,731 (tax- 
able for county $38,679,370). 



RIVERSIDE CO.— Continued. 
Hemet. 

Hemet [Feee] Public Libbaey and 
Beanch, Riveeside Co. Feee Libeaby. 
Miss Violet R. Tapper, Lib'n. 

In the early spring a table was cleared 
and set aside for the display of wild 
flowers. This table was soon an attrac- 
tive spot of color in the library and 
aroused the interest of many of' the 
library patrons to such an extent that 
they often went out of their way to 
bring in some variety that had not been 
displayed. During the spring over one 
hundred fifty varieties were classified, 
labeled and displayed. 

On May 23, the educational film "The 
Four Seasons" was the main attraction at 
the "movie" given under the auspices of 
the Auxiliary Library Board as a benefit 
for the library. Fifty dollars was added 
to the library treasury as a result of this 
benefit. 

Violet R. Tappee, Lib'n. 



Riverside. 

Boys' Polytechnic High School and 
Junioe College Ltbbaby and Branch, 
Riverside Co. Feee Library. A. G. 
Paul, Prin. Miss Rosa B. Cage, Lib'n. 

Our library has reecived as a gift 
thirty volumes on economics which are a 
great addition to that department of the 
library. 

The Junior College will within a year 
or two be in a separate building with its 
own library, therefore we are accession- 
ing and cataloging our new books accord- 
ingly. 

Various parties and social affairs have 
been given in the library within the past 
few months. A faculty party, given in 
the evening with over a hundred guests, 
was held not long ago. The Spanish 
Club had an evening meeting and pre- 
sented a little play, using one corner 
of the library for a stage. This week 
the Science Department is to have a 
nature exhibit here, with various kinds 
of wildflowers, etc., of California, and a 
special collection of books. 

Rosa B. Cage, Lib'n. 



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285 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

(Seventh class.) 

County seat, Sacramento. 
Area, 988 sq. mi. Pop. 90,978. 
Assessed valuation $133,003,882 (tax- 
able for county $112,253,954). 

Sacramento Co. Free Library, Sac- 
ramento. Miss Cornelia D. Provines, 
Lib'n. 

An important work of the quarter was 
that which was clone by Mrs Frances 
Greenwood in the teaching of Music Ap- 
preciation Through the Use of The 
Phonograph, in the rural schools of the 
county. Mrs Greenwood spent six weeks 
in the county, visiting each school and 
instructing the teachers through work 
with the children in their respective 
schools. Mrs Greenwood was employed 
by the County Superintendent of Schools, 
but all of the materials which were used 
in her work, charts, books, records, etc., 
were furnished by the County Library, 
and the County Librarian accompanied 
her upon many of her visits in order to 
gain a knowledge of her methods, and of 
the materials which would best serve her 
needs and the future call of the teachers. 

Upon April 24, the County Librarian 
met with the Home Demonstration Agent 
and the chairmen of the Home Depart- 
ment of the Farm Bureau Centers, and 
discussed with them the best way of 
serving the Farm Centers with library 
material. It was arranged that any 
chairman who so desired, might consti- 
tute herself the librarian or custodian of 
her center, by writing to the County Li- 
brarian and signifying her willingness to 
do so. The books which would be re- 
quired for the use of that center, would 
then be sent directly to the chairman as 
custodian, who would give them out at 
the Farm Center meetings, and hold her- 
self responsible for their safe return to 
the County Library. No time limit would 
be imposed upon the use of the books, 
either to the center or to the individual, 
but a monthly report of circulation 
would be rendered by the chairman to 
the County Library. It was understood 
that this privilege referred only to tech- 
nical books for the use of the center, 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 

and did not include fiction or general 
literature such as would be handled by 
the branches. It is believed that in this 
way, the books of the County Library 
will become of real value to the Farm 
Bureau Centers. 

On April S the North Sacramento 
Branch was formally opened in its new 
quarters, by a reception given by the 
North Sacramento Parent-Teacher Asso- 
ciation. The room in the Erickson build- 
ing, to which the library had been moved 
from its former location in a store, is 
commodious and tastefully furnished, and 
the people have shown their apprecia- 
tion of the enlarged quarters and im- 
proved conditions by becoming libera) 
patrons of the library. During the month 
of April, five times as many books were 
issued as had ever been issued in one 
month before. 

The County Librarian attended the 
joint Annual Meeting of the California 
Library Association and of the County 
Librarians' Association at Hotel Del Cor- 
onado June 12 to 16, inclusive. 

During the quarter, the County Li- 
brarian made 21 visits to schools and 
branches, and delivered the following ad- 
dresses : "Branch libraries in school build- 
ings," at meeting of Fifth District of 
California Library Association at Stock- 
ton, April 7; "How to attain mental 
equilibrium through the use of books" at 
San Juan Union High School April 11 ; 
"Some present-day aspects of the novel" 
at Elk Grove Parent-Teacher Association 
April 14 ; "Kipling as a writer for chil- 
dren" at Lisbon school April 19; "Story 
telling" at Isleton school, May 4; "The 
poetry of Rudyard Kipling" at Sacra- 
mento Grange, May 13 ; a graduation 
address "The kingdom of the mind" at 
Sylvan school, May 26. 

Cornelia D. Provines, Lib*n. 

North Sacramento (P. O. Sacramento, 
R. R. A.; exp. Sacramento). 

North Sacramento Branch, Sacra- 
mento Co. Free Library. 

See note under Sacramento Co. Free 
Library. 



286 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Juty, 1922 



SACRAMENTO CO.— Continued. 
Sacramento. 

?§ Sacramento Fbee Public Library. 
Miss Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

The staff has again been disrupted, 
Marguerite Chatfield, reference libra- 
rian, resigned to take up county work in 
Siskiyou and Nellie Cowan was married 
June 17 to Mr Hilding Johnson. Mrs 
Fred Percival substituted iu the refer- 
ence department for a month until Mar- 
jorie Richards, a member of this year's 
class in Library Science at the Univer- 
sity of California, was ready to take the 
position permanently. Miss Leah Fin- 
kelstein accepted the position of loan 
desk supervisor and has already inau- 
gurated some efficient changes. 

One of the features of '49 week was 
a story told over the radio by Corinne 
Ruttle, the Children's Librarian — the 
tale of the rescue of Capt Sutter and his 
party from destruction by Indians 
through the vigilance of a faithful dog 
was compiled from old records and broad- 
casted to the children of Oakland through 
the courtesy of Mr Charles Greene, the 
•librarian. 

Special privileges are being allowed for 
the vacation period ; and each week sug- 
gestions for week-end book kits are being 
published in the Bee. 

Susan T. Smith, Lib'n. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

(Forty- third class.) 

County seat, Hollister. 
Area, 1476 sq. mi. Pop. 8995. 
Assessed valuation $14,256,227 (tax- 
able for county $12,730,850). 

San Benito Co. Free Library, Hol- 
lister. Mrs Ora M. Regnart, Lib'n. 

During the month of April the libra- 
rian visited the Farm Bureau Centers 
and asked each center to take charge of 
the Library Branch in its district. The 
members were enthusiastic over the idea 
and it has helped advertise the use of 
the County Library. Owing to the scat- 
tered population and the lack of a cen- 
tral place to put the books this county 
has been served entirely through the 
schools with the teacher in charge. This 



SAN BENITO CO.— Continued. 

has proven very unsatisfactory. Branches 
were established at the following Cen- 
ters : Anzar, Ausaymus, Cienega, Cotton- 
wood, Fairhaven, Fairview, Mayhew, 
Pacheco. Panoche, San Juan Yalley, 
South Side, West Side. 

The librarian attended the County Li- 
brarians' Convention and a meeting of 
the California Library Association held 
at Coronado, June 12 to 16. 

Ora M. Regnart, Lib'n. 

San Benito Co. High School Li- 
brary and Branch, San Benito Co. 
Free Library. James P. Davis, Prin. 

For each period in the day a girl is 
chosen from the upper classmen to take 
charge of the library, put the books in 
order and to give out books to students 
for the study periods. Every Tuesday 
afternoon, after school hours, the County 
Librarian, Mrs Ora Regnart, meets the 
girls and gives them instruction in re- 
pairing the books. This the girls do 
themselves under her supervision. Fre- 
quently Mrs Regnart gives lectures to the 
girls on the value of caring for books 
and drills them on the different parts of 
the books. As a general supervisor over 
these girls a Junior College girl is chosen 
as an assistant librarian, looking after 
the detailed part of the work. For- this 
work all the girls are given a small 
amount of credit, and thus far we have 
experienced no difficulty in getting- them 
to serve one period during the day. 

James P. Davis, Prin. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

(Ninth class.) 

County seat, San Bernardino. 
Area, 20,055 sq. mi. Pop. 73,401. 
Assessed valuation $89,511,779 (tax- 
able for county $54,161,950). 

San Bernardino Co. Free Library, 
San Bernardino. Miss Caroline S. 
Waters, Lib'n. 

Miss Caroline S. Waters, County Li- 
brarian, and Miss Grace E. Curtis of 
the School Department, attended the 
California Library Association conven- 
tion at Coronado. We have lost two of 



Vol. 17, 110. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



287 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

our staff recently. Miss Irene E. Smith 
resigned June 15 to attend the Univers 
sity of California for a year. Miss Lu- 
cile Farnsworth resigned June 1 and was 
married to Mr A. Harold Blake of Salt 
Lake City June 8. Miss Ruby Nish, 
who resigned last September, is substi 
tuting in the library for the summer 
months. 

Tbe members of the library staff have 
taken turns each month in writing arti- 
cles on certain subjects of interest to the 
farmers, followed by a reading list of 
books on the subject, for the Farm 
Bureau bulletin. The articles are not 
always on subjects related to farming as 
farmers are interested in other kinds of 
books besides those on farming. 

New custodians have taken charge at 
several branches — Mr John Alexander at 
the County Hospital May 1, Mr Harry 
M. Seelye at the County Hospital Tuber- 
cular Ward May 1, Mr Walter T. 
Trickey at Helendale May 6, and Mrs 
Jane Long at Trona June 1. Miss Bess 
Munn is the custodian of the Big Bear 
Valley branch for the summer, having 
taken charge June 1, the day the branch 
was moved to the Bear Valley Pavilion 
for the summer months. 

The library branch at the George 
Junior Republic has been closed tempo- 
rarily for about two months. The 
Ontario School District withdrew from 
the County Library June 20. There were 
six school branches in this district. 

The mountain branches at Crestline, 
Camp Baldy, Pinecrest, and Strawberry 
Flats were opened during May for the 
summer months. All of these except 
Strawberry Flats were open on a small 
scale during the winter months. 

Caroline S. Waters, Lib'n. 

San Bernardino Co. Hospital 
Branch, San Bernardino Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

San Bernardino Co. Hospital, 
Tubercular Ward Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 

Big Bear Valley 

(P. O. Pine Knot; no exp. office). 

Big Bear Valley Branch, San Ber- 
nardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

California George Junior Republic 

(P. O. Chino; exp. Pomona). 

California Geogre Junior Republic 
Branch, San Bernardino Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Camp Baldy (Exp. Upland). 

Camp Baldy Branch, San Bernar- 
dino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Crestline (No exp. office). 

Crestline Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Helendale. 

Helendale Branch, San Bernar- 
dino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Ontario. 

Ontario School Dist. Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library, was dis- 
continued June 20, 1922. 

Pinecrest (No exp. office). 

Pinecrest Branch, San Bernardino 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Strawberry Flats 
(P. O. Twin Peaks; no exp. office). 

Strawberry Flats Branch, San 
Bernardino Co. Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 



288 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— Continued. 
Trona (Exp. via Searles). 

Tkona Branch, San Beenakdino Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under San Bernardino Co. 
Free Library. 

Upland. 

Upland [Free] Public Library and 
Branch, San Bernardino Co. Free 
Library. Mrs F. H. Manker, Lib'n. 

As we did not get news in the last 
issue of "News Notes" perhaps we may 
be forgiven if we go back a little further 
than three months and tell of our good 
friend Mr A. Podrasnik, who again re- 
membered us at Christmas time with a 
check for $100. Just lately Miss Aurelia 
Harwood gave us a credit of $100 in a 
Los Angeles book store, we to choose our 
own time to use it up and select our own 
books. This is to be used for the gen- 
eral public, not for some special collec- 
tion. Then another good thing that camt 
to us within the last two months was the 
gift from the City Board of Trustees of 
six indirect ceiling lights, taking the 
place of some thirty odd lights scattered 
about the building and giving us a softer. 
more satisfying light than heretofore. 
The library of the late Major Lawrence 
was also a gift to us recently. 

The book "How to Live," has been 
donated to the library by the Business 
Woman's Club of Upland, which was 
organized over two years ago by the 
librarian. During the coming year four 
meetings of the club will be devoted to a 
study of this book. 

The library board decided to donate 
a book to the boy and one to the girl, 
who, during this summer read the best 
list of books. This is under the Parent- 
Teachers' Association which is holding 
an exposition in the fall of the work 
done in different lines by the school chil- 
dren this summer. A whole case of beau- 
tiful prizes have ,their home in the 
library waiting for the time to come to 
make the awards. 

We are having a display case built for 
us by one of the boys at Chaffey Union 
High School. We will take great pleas- 
ure in using it when completed. 



SAN BERNARDINO CO.— -Continued. 

U pland — Continued. 

The basement of the library is being 
still used as a civic center, a baby clinic 
being among the latest and best things 
held, meeting every Wednesday after- 
noon. 

Mrs F. H. Manker, Lib'n. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY. 

(Fifth class.) 

County seat, San Diego. 
Area, 4377 sq. mi. Pop. 132,248. 
Assessed valuation $90,434,293 (tax- 
able for county $80,936,802). 

San Diego Co. Free Library, San 
Diego. Miss Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

The County Librarian made a talk on 
children's books and reading before the 
Women's Club of Vista May 23. The 
meeting was held in the club house which 
also houses the branch library and a col- 
lection of books for the children was 
used to illustrate the talk. 

At the California Conference of Social 
Work held in San Diego April 24 to 28, 
the work of the schools of San Diego was 
shown in an exhibit planned by Miss 
Ada York, County Superintendent of 
Schools. In this exhibit the County Li- 
brary illustrated its co-operation with 
the rural schools by means of a sample 
collection of books, pictures, phonograph 
records, magazines and stereographs and 
a map showing the school branches of 
the library. 

Eleanor Hitt, Lib'n. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

(Second class.) 

City and county coterminous. 
Area, 43 sq. mi. Pop. 500,670. 
Assessed valuation $869,187,114 (tax- 
able for county $609,884,624). 

|§[Free] Public Library of the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
Robert Rea, Lib'n. 

John Vance Cheney, poet, essayist and 
musician of national reputation, died at 
his San Diego home May 2 in his 
seventy-fourth year. He was librarian 



Vol. 17, 110. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES — QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



289 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

of the San Francisco Public Library 
from 1887 to 1894 and of the Newberry 
Library of Chicago from 1894 to 1909. 
Since 1909 he has made his home in San 
Diego. — 'San Francisco Bulletin, My 2 

Boys' and Girls' Aid Society Li- 
brary and Branch, San Francisco 
Public Library. Geo. C. Turner, Supt. 

We have some 700 books specially 
selected for boys and the reading room is 
the most popular place in the home. We 
have about an average of one hundred 
fifty boys and every afternoon the read- 
ing room is open from four o'clock (after 
school) until five thirty and again in 
the evening from six thirty until eight 
o'clock. There is always a group of 
boys deeply absorbed in their books. 

Owing to one of the rules of the home 
which confines a boy the first six weeks 
of his stay with us to the bounds of the 
home and yard, the result is to make a 
boy seek other means of filling his time 
than those he was probably accustomed 
to when at liberty and he often develops 
a taste for reading which has hitherto 
lain dormant. 

We have no paid librarian, the work 
being taken care of by the head matron 
who is also the librarian. 

Sophie Louder, Matron and Lib'n. 

California Academy of Science Li- 
braky. Dr Joseph Grinnell, Lib'n. 

The collection of about 5000 volumes 
of books and pamphlets recently pre- 
sented to the Library of the California 
Academy of Sciences by Dr Barton W. 
Evermann has now been cataloged and 
incorporated into the library and is ready 
for use by the staff and members of the 
Academy. These books were in large 
part natural history publications, books 
and pamphlets relating to fishes and fish- 
eries, and add materially to the Acad- 
emy's collection in that department. The 
library is maintained for the use of the 
staff and members of the academy and 
does not circulate outside its own mem- 
bership. 

The academy has a large collection of 
the publications of sicentific societies, 
both domestic and foreign. Current and 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

past numbers, which the war held up, 
are now being received. 

Helen Van Duzee, Cataloger. 

* Standard Oil Co. Library. Miss 
Margaret Hatch, Lib'n. 

During the past two years that libra- 
ries in the state have been cooperating 
with the Standard Oil Library in giving 
library service to company employees in 
the field, men at one hundred nine Stand- 
ard Oil stations have been supplied with 
books. 

County free libraries have established 
community branches at twenty-two pump 
stations in Contra Costa, San Joaquin, 
Stanislaus, Fresno, Kings, Tulare and 
Kern counties. The company pump sta- 
tions are usually in isolated places, and 
with the employees and their families, 
form small communities in themselves. 
Branch libraries located in the station 
club houses have filled a real need for 
books, as well as proving a factor in the 
social activities centering about the club 
houses. 

In the following counties county free 
libraries have expressed their willing- 
ness to supply books needed in connec- 
tion with the company school corre- 
spondence courses at stations where the 
demand is sufficient : Humboldt, Siskiyou, 
Tehama, Glenn, Butte, Colusa, Sutter, 
Yolo, Sacramento, Solano, Contra Costa, 
San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Amador, Tuol- 
umne. Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, 
San Benito, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, 
Santa Barbara. 

Twenty-four city libraries have also 
given library service to men taking the 
school courses at stations located in 
cities and towns in these counties. 

Reports of the good use made of these 
library branches and appreciation of the 
service by the men have come from pipe 
line superintendents, company personnel 
workers, and pump station custodians. 
Field representatives of the school have 
reported that book service given by the 
libraries has been invaluable in the 
school work. 

The supplying of books to men at 
many of the stations in the state has 
been a splendid example of library serv- 



290 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. ■ [Jllly, 1922 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

ice made possible by California's county 
free library system, with its supplemen- 
tary state library sendee. 

Maegaeet Hatch. Lib'n. 

S u t e o Beanch, Califobnia State 
Libeaby. Milton J. Ferguson, State 
Lib'n. Mrs Laura Steffens Suggett, 
Branch Lib'n. 

During the quarter, the work of check- 
ing, revising and rearranging the pub- 
lishers' deposits was finished. Although 
classified in the same way as all material 
in the custody of the Sutro Branch, it 
was shelved separately. This had been 
found to be a very great disadvantage for 
the best results, so now it has been re- 
marked in all records and shelved where 
it belongs according to classification, 
However, there is a complete separate 
card record for this material as well as 
a card record under each publisher, so 
that it is still a very simple matter to 
pick out and exhibit the work of a par- 
ticular publisher. 

As the result of the gift of $250, it 
will be possible to have the work of list- 
ing and classifying the old Spanish and 
Latin books in the Sutro Library con- 
tinued during July and August. This 
will be a very great help toward fuller 
use of these valuable Collections as they 
include a great quantity of material 
needed by the workers in several differ- 
ent fields of research. 

It was possible to finish in June, and 
send to the Los Angeles Public Library. 
a complete author list on cards of all 
genealogical material in the Sutro 
Branch. This is merely an exchange 
service as for several years the Los An- 
geles Public Library has been sending 
the Sutro Branch cards for additions to 
its genealogical resources. 

Besides the older library frienfls. quite 
a few new donors and depositors have 
brought in important items during the 
last few months, so that the collection 
grows constantly in spite of the fact that 
there are no funds for purchases or sub- 
scriptions. 

Laura Steffens Suggett, 

Branch Lib'n. 



SAN FRANCISCO— Continued. 

University of Califoenia. Medical 
School and Hospitals Libeaby. Miss 
Eva West, Lib'n. 

Miss Helen Mason, Assistant Libra- 
rian, has resigned for a year of European 
travel. Miss Hazel Schultz, Riverside 
Library Service School '22, has been 
appointed to succeed Miss Mason. 

Eva West, Lib'n. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

(Eighth class.) 

County seat, Stockton. 
Area, 1370 sq. mi. Pop. 79,905. 
Assessed valuation $110,791,099 (lax- 
able for county $97,593,6SG). 

San Joaquin Co. F b e e Libraby, 
Stockton. H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. 
Miss Ida E. Condit, in charge. 

During June, a branch was established 
at the new U. S. Farm School ou Rough 
and Ready Island. 

The circulation for the county, includ- 
ing Stockton, for year ending June 30, 
1922, was 368,286 (excluding schools), 
an increase of 86,622, or 30 per cent 
over preceding year. 

The Board of Supervisors has author- 
ized an appropriation of $19,000 for 
1922-23. This is an increase of $3,000. 
H. O. Pabkinson, Lib'n. 

Rough and Ready Island. 

Rough and Ready Island Beanch, 
San Joaquin Co. Feee Libeaby, was 
established in June, 1922. 

Stockton. 

$§ Stockton Feee Public Libeaby. 
H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. 

Direct-by-phone advertising has been 
taken up as a routine service. The plan 
was based upon the realization of a 
child's natural feeling of importance 
upon receiving a personal invitation from 
a public institution (in this case, made 
especially impressive by use of the 
phone) and the resulting impulse to re- 
spond accordingly. Miss Frances Green 



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291 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 

Stockton — Continued. 

of the Young People's Department spends 
two hours each Saturday morning at this 
service, using a private one-party line 
in order to accomplish the maximum 
amount of business, adapting her sales 
talk to each situation, and making it 
brief as possible. The list of prospects 
was compiled as follows : As a by-product 
of the five-minute visits made to all 
elementary school class-rooms during 
Children's Book Week, class room rosters 
were obtained to an extent of 2500 
addresses, which have been subsequently 
used effectively for mailing lists. For 
phone work, these names were searched 
in the library registration file, and those 
not found were compared with similar 
surnames in the telephone book. Where 
addresses matched, the phone number 
was added, completing the final list of 
new prospects to be reached by phone. 
As a result of the first four Saturdays 
of phoning, 128 calls were made ; 116 
children were reached either directly or 
through a member of the family ; 72 chil- 
dren responded within a week by taking 
books from the library for the first time. 
This is a direct return of 61 per cent of 
those reached. In addition, the indirect, 
unregistered returns, through the uncon- 
scious propaganda of the children among 
their mates and families, are believed to 
be an important gain. The above results 
are far .greater than those obtained 
through the direct-by-mail advertising to 
children, which has been bringing a keyed 
return of 10 per cent only. 

The circulation of the Young People's 
Department increased by 20,100, or 44 
per cent, for year ending June 30, 1022. 
The total city circulation was 206,087, 
an increase of 4S,165, or 30 per cent. 

The following items placed in the New 
Classified Ad Section of the local paper 
have been successful in attracting the 
attention of new T residents and others : 

For Rent Free — Books on salesman- 
ship, radio, and what not, at Public Li- 
brary. 



SAN JOAQUIN CO.— Continued. 
Stockton — Continued. 

Furnished Rooms in Public Library 
for reading and study. 

Found — An idea in book borrowed free 
from the Public Library, Hunter and 
Market streets. 

Following the example of other libra- 
ries, in May, Stockton declared a mora- 
torium on overdue books, mailing 965 
cartoon announcements to possessors or 
possible possessors of overdue books, and 
placing a large box on the front steps to 
receive the books of those too embar- 
rassed to bring them inside. Fines were 
called off for the week, and the local 
paper announced the fact. Forty over- 
due books were dropped info (he box 
within the first two hours. Five hundred 
seventeen, including 22 not charged, were 
turned in during the week, many of them 
out for a year or more. Of this number, 
it is estimated that 150 would have been 
returned within the same period under 
normal routine. Many others would have 
come in sooner or later, so it is impossible 
to tell the definite gain in returned 
books. The publicity incidental to the 
moratorium, however, was considered 
worth while in itself. 

Staff assistants received an average 
salary increase of 17 per cent for 1922- 
23. We have managed to get $90 set 
as our minimum for assistants instead 
of ,$72.50. The salaries of four assist- 
ants were increased IS per cent, four 15 
per cent, two 24 per cent and one 4 per 
cent. 

Miss Dorothy M. I. Wilson, University 

of California Library School, '22, and 

formerly of the Victoria Public Library, 

has joined the staff as general assistant. 

H. O. Parkinson, Lib'n. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

(Thirtieth class.) 

County seat, San Luis Obispo. 
Area, 3500 sq. mi. Pop. 21,893. 
Assessed valuation $36,161,472 (tax- 
able for county $31,916,037). 



292 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



SAN LUIS OBISPO CO.— Continued. 

San Luis Obispo Co. Feee Library, 
San Luis Obispo. Miss Flo A. Gantz, 
Lib'n. 

Harmony and Mountain View schools 
have been added during the quarter. 
Mountain View school has been known 
as Banning 2nd. The Banning school 
trustees have administered two schools. 
There are now two separate districts, 
known as Banning and Mountain View. 

Miss Mary Kent, first assistant since 
last September, has resigned and gone to 
her home in Indiana. Miss Ruth Bishop, 
a graduate of the Los Angeles Library 
school and for a number of years a mem- 
ber of the Pomona Public Library staff, 
has been selected to fill the place. 

Flo A. Gantz, Lib'n. 

Harmony. 

Harmony School Dist. Branch, 
San Luis Obispo Co. Free Library, 
was established in April, 1922. 

Mountain View School Dist. 

Mountain View School Dist. 
Branch, San Luis Obispo Co. Free 
Library, was established during the 
quarter. 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Luis Obispo Free Public Li- 
brary. Mrs E. L. Kellogg, Lib'n. 

Mrs Satira Gano, for many years 
librarian of the Paso Robles Public Li- 
brary, has been appointed to the position 
of assistant here. 

At the invitation of the Library Board, 
the city council met in informal session 
at the library to discuss ways and means 
for the coming year. Although no defin- 
ite action was taken, it is believed the 
meeting will result in closer .co-operation 
and better understanding of library prob- 
lems. 

On the return trip from the meeting of 
the California Library Association, the 
librarian spent a day visiting the Oxnard 
Public Library. 

Abbie S. Kellogg, Lib'n. 



SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

(Twenty-first class.) 

County seat, Redwood City. 
Area, 470 sq. mi. Pop. 36,781. 
Assessed valuation $39,064,733 (tax- 
able for county $35,915,569). 

San Mateo Co. Free Library, Red- 
wood City. Miss Edna Holroyd, Lib'n. 

A branch was established in the San 
Gregorio school district April 1. 

Edna Holroyd, Lib'n. 

San Gregorio. 

San Gregorio School Dist. Branch, 
San Mateo Co. Free Library, was 
established April 1, 1922. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

(Eighteenth class.) 

County seat, Santa Barbara. 
Area, 2450 sq. mi. Pop. 41,097. 
Assessed valuation $56,934,231 (tax- 
able for county $49,252,150). 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

(Sixth class.) 

County seat, San Jose. 
Area, 1355 sq. mi. Pop. 100,588. 
Assessed valuation $115,933,819 (tax- 
able for county $96,497,995). 

Santa Clara Co. Free Library, San 
Jose. Miss Stella Huntington, Lib'n. 

Miss Louise Wheeler was appointed 
custodian of Campbell Branch to begin 
work May 1. Miss Beth Kennedy, the 
former custodian, resigned on account of 
ill health. 

Stella Huntington, Lib'n. 



Palo Alto. 

Palo Alto [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Frances D. Patterson, Lib'n. 

A builders' contract was filed for 
record April 24 in the County Recorder's 
office, whereby Barrett and Hipp agree to 



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293 



SANTA CLARA CO.— Continued. 

Palo Alto — Continued. 

complete and finish a reinforced concrete 
addition to the library building in Palo 
Alto by the first of October, next, at a 
cost not to exceed the sum of $28,592. — 
San Jose Mercury-Herald, Ap 25 



San Jose. 

§|| San Jose Free Public Library. 
Charles F. Woods, Lib'n. 

Charles F. Woods, for the past five 
years city librarian, tendered his resigna- 
tion June 22 to the board of trustees. 
His resignation becomes effective July 
31. This announcement will occasion 
general regret on the part of library 
patrons, as Mr Woods has labored ener- 
getically to do everything possible with 
the limited funds at his disposal. — San 
Jose Mercury-Herald, Je 23 

In the early part of July, Mr Woods 
was appointed librarian of the Riverside 
Public Library. 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

(Twenty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Santa Cruz. 
Area, 425 sq. mi. Pop. 26,2G9. 
Assessed valuation $23,738,625 (tax- 
able for county $20,743,455). 

SHASTA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fifth class.) 

County seat, Redding. 
Area, 4050 sq. mi. Pop. 13,311. 
Assessed valuation $20,645,005 (tax- 
able for county $15,874,085). 

SIERRA COUNTY. 

(Fifty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Downieville. 
Area, 957 sq. mi. Pop. 1783. 
Assessed valuation $2,930,890 (taxable 
for county $2,541,305). 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

(Thirty-third class.) 

County seat, Yreka. 
Area, 6079 sq. mi. Pop. 18,545. 
Assessed valuation $28,312,556 (tax- 
able for county $21,375,305). 

Siskiyou Co. Free Library, Yreka. 
Miss Thelma Brackett, Lib'n. 

Macdoel Branch was re-established 
May 12, with O. E. Snider as custodian. 
Thelma Brackett, Lib'n. 

Macdoel. 

Macdoel Branch, Siskiyou Co. Free 
Library, was re-established May 12, 
1922. 

SOLANO COUNTY. 

(Nineteenth class.) 

County seat, Fairfield. 
Area, 911 sq. mi. Pop. 40,602. 
Assessed valuation $34,570,425 (tax- 
able for county $29,628,033). 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

(Fourteenth class.) 

County seat, Santa Rosa. 
Area, 1540 sq. mi. Pop. 51,990. 
Assessed valuation $53,335,210 (tax- 
able for county $47,353,940). 

STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

(Sixteenth class.) 

County seat, Modesto. 
Area, 14S6 sq. mi. Pop. 43,557. 
Assessed valuation $58,022,514 (tax- 
able for county $51,386,510). 

Stanislaus Co. Free Library, 
Modesto. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, 
Lib'n. 

The members of the county and city 
library staff were hostesses to the Tri- 
angle Club of Modesto at the library, 
May 19, at which time an original 
masque, "Story and Song Through the 
Ages" was given by the staff. Episode 
first, "The 18th Century" reflected the 



294 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 

spirit of the romantic novel and was 
acted by Miss lone Townsend as Mis- 
tress Joyce Alden, Miss Alma Rossel as 
Mistress Janice Meredith, Miss Irma Cole 
as Mister Richard Carvel, and Miss Ida 
Huntington as Honorable Caleb Coffin. 
Incidental music was the Don Juan 
minuet by Mozart and "Drink to me 
only with thine eyes." Episode second, 
"The 19th Century," illustrated childrens' 
southern literature and was acted by Miss 
Bessie Silverthorn as Mrs Courtney Fair- 
fax Lee, and Miss Louise Oreglia as 
Little Virginia Lee. Incidental music 
consisted of "Carry me back to Old Vir- 
giny," and three Virginia reels. Episode 
third, "The 20th Century," represented 
the new poetry and was acted by Miss 
Cleona Eslinger, who read "The Calliope 
Yell," by Vachel Lindsey. Refreshments 
concluded the evening. 

The 8th grade of the Lowell School 
Branch of the County Free Library, vis- 
ited the library May 20, and examined 
each department under the guidance of 
Miss Louise Oreglia, school assistant. A 
picnic luncheon was enjoyed in Graceada 
Park, after which the children returned 
to the library and browsed among the 
books or listened to phonograph records. 

June 15, a collection of 50 books and 
a book case were sent to the Stanislaus 
County Boy Scouts Camp, at Strawberry, 
up in the Tuolumne mountains. The 
library will be in charge of James Mc- 
Giffin, Scout Master. A similar library has 
been promised the Girl Scouts and Camp 
Fire Girls camps. 

The County Librarian visited the 
branch at the tubercular hospital at Ah- 
wahnee in Madera County in June, pre- 
paratory to turning over the administra- 
tion of the branch for another year to the 
Merced County Free Library. The library 
has recently been placed in the new hos- 
pital building iu a very attractive room 
and is much enjoyed. 

At an informal staff meeting the 
County Librarian reviewed the annual 
convention of the California Library 
Association and County Librarians. The 
official photograph and snapshots illus- 
trated the talk, and ice cream served to 
simulate the cooling breezes of Coronado. 
Bessie B. Silverthorn, Lib'n 



STANISLAUS CO.— Continued. 

Lowell School Dist. 

(P. O. and exp. Hughson). 

Lowell School Dist. Branch, Stan- 
islaus Co. Free Library. 

See note under Stanislaus Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Modesto. 

M c H e n r y [Free] Public Library 
and Branch, Stanislaus Co. Free 
Library. Miss Bessie B. Silverthorn, 
Lib'n. 

Miss Mildred De Ferrari of Oakland 
and graduate of the University of Cali- 
fornia Library School, Class of 1922, suc- 
ceeds Miss Cleona Eslinger, cataloger, 
who returned to her home iu Red Bluff, 
June 2S, to be married. 

On its book exhibit table the library 
is featuring the subjects exploited by the 
Year-round Bookselling Committee in its 
very attractive posters furnished the 
library every few weeks. The display of 
books on house building and furnishing 
with the poster "Will the new home have 
books?" has now given way to the collec- 
tion on vacation books and the pictures 
slogan "Take along a book." 

New awnings and repainting have 
freshened the exterior of the library dur- 
ing the past month, while inside, new 
shelving and the rearrangement of the 
work rooms has made for greater con- 
venience. 

Bessie B. Silverthobn, Lib'n. 



SUTTER COUNTY. 

(Forty-first class.) 

County seat, Yuba City. 
Area, 611 sq. mi. Pop. 10,115. 
Assessed valuation $21,732,757 (tax- 
able for county $18,241,155). 

Sutter Co. Free Library, Yuba . City. 
Miss Edna J. Hewitt, Lib'n. 

The most interesting news that the 
Sutter County Free Library can report is 
that the Board . of Supervisors had 
another nice large room built on to the 
library building. In this room a music 
record cabinet was built and we shall 
begin giving record service this fall. In 
the old stack room the supervisors allowed 



YOl. 17, 110. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



295 



SUTTER CO.— Continued. 

us to have two drop lights between each 
stack so that we ueed not use a flash 
light any more in order to see the books. 
Edna J. Hewitt, Lib'n. 



TEHAMA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Red Bluff. 
Area, 3200 sq. mi. Pop. 12*882. 
Assessed valuation $19,841,981 (taxa- 
ble for county $16,967,555). 

Red Bluff. 

§ || Herbert Kraft Free [Public] 
Library. Miss Frances Walker, Lib'n. 

Miss Frances Walker of Richfield was 
appointed librarian at a recent meeting 
of the library board of trustees, after 
careful investigation of her credentials 
and record in library work. She has had 
experience in library work in both San 
Jose and San Francisco. She will assume 
her duties here the latter part of April. 
Miss Walker is a graduate of the Corn. 
ing Union High School. — Red Bluff News, 
Ap 7 

TRINITY COUNTY. 

(Mfty'fifth class.) 

County seat, Weaverville. 
Area, 3276 sq. mi. Pop. 2551. 
Assessed valuation $3,844,235 (taxable 
for county $3,524,755). 

Trinity Co. Free Library, Weaver 
ville. Miss Lila G. Dobell, Lib'n. 

The most interesting news in Trinity 
County is the fact that half of the schools 
have purchased phonographs, and a goodly 
number more will have them before school 
opens this fall. 

The shelves so badly needed in the 
main office will soon be finished, as the 
rest of the lumber needed has arrived. 
Lila G. Dobell, Lib'n. 



TULARE COUNTY. 

(Eleventh class.) 

County seat, Visalia. 
Area, 4863 sq. mi. Pop. 59,031. 
Assessed valuation $81,738,804 (tax- 
able for county $67,240,380). 

Tulare Co. Free Library, Visalia. 
Miss Gretchen Flower, Lib'n. 

Miss Flower, two assistants, from main 
office and custodians of three of the read- 
ing rooms attended the annual convention 
of the Fourth District of the California 
Library Association at Fresno April 8. 
So much pleasure and benefit was derived 
by the custodians from the discussions 
and addresses that their attendance will 
be especially encouraged at district meet- 
ings in the future. 

Three assistants have joined the library 
staff during the quarter, Mrs Nellie De 
Laughter, Miss Margaret Walters, and 
Miss Zena Trinka. Miss Trinka is the 
author of two books on the history of 
Xorth Dakota, "North Dakota of Today" 
and "Out Where the West Begins.'' The 
first book has been adopted for use in the 
elementary schools of that state. "Out 
Where the West Begins" is illustrated 
from the photographs taken by Barry, the 
photographer who accompanied Custer's 
men. Miss Trinka recently granted the 
editor of Larned's History for Ready Ref- 
erence the right to make use of excerpts 
from her books. 

During the quarter branches were estab- 
lished in East Lynne and Vandalia school 
districts, and the branch in Ash Springs 
school district was discontinued. The 
Strathmore High School, deciding to 
accumulate its own reference library, has 
withdrawn from the system. Branches 
were re-established at Columbine and La 
Motte in custodians' homes, Mrs Frank 
Barnett being custodian at Columbine and 
Mrs Claire B. Buffington at La Motte. 
The summer branches at General Grant 
National Park and at Giant Forest were 
opened again on June 15, with Mrs Mattie 



296 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 

Decker and Mrs Guy Hopping in charge 
as they were last year. 

A four months' leave of absence was 
granted to Miss Myrtle Clotfelter, custo- 
dian of the Orosi Branch Library. Miss 
Clotfelter is touring the eastern and cen- 
tral states. During her absence Miss Anna 
McWilliams, formerly an elementary 
school teacher, is acting as substitute. 
Gretchen Flower, L-ib'n. 

Ash Springs School Dist. 

(P. O. Badger; exp. via Cutler). 

Ash Springs School Dist. Branch. 
Tulake Co. Free Library, was discon- 
tinued May 1, 1922. 

Columbine (P. O. and exp. Delano). 

Columbine Branch, Tulare Co. 
Free Library, was re-established June 
20, 1922. 

East Lynne School Dist. 

(P. O. and exp. Visalia). 

East Lynne School Dist. Branch, 
Tulare Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished April 11, 1922. 

General Grant National Park 

(Exp. Kings River Transportation Co., 
General Grant National Park, via 
Sanger). 

General Grant National Park 
Branch, Tulare Co. Free Library. 

See note under Tulare Co. Free Library. 

Giant Forest (Exp. Lemon Cove). 

Giant Forest Branch, Tulare Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Tulare Co. Free Library. 

La Motte (P. O. Porterville, R. R. 3, 
Box 218; exp. Porterville). 

La Motte Branch, Tulabe Co. Free 
Library, was re-established June 7, 1922. 



TULARE CO.— Continued. 
Orosi (Exp. Cutler). 

Orosi Branch, Tulare Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Tulare Co. Free Library. 

Orosi High School Library. L. J. 
Williams, Prin. 

We have added to the school library a 
set of "The Pocket University" edition 
including 29 volumes. Also the school has 
recently purchased 60 volumes of fiction 
and nonfiction. We have only the begin- 
ning of a library but we are constantly 
adding to it. 

Ruth Lee. 

Strathmore. 

Strathmore Union High School 
Library and Branch, Tulare Co. Free 
Library. A. B. Snyder, Prin. 

See note under Tulare Co. Free Library. 

Vandalia School Dist. 

(P. O. and exp. Porterville). 

Vandalia School Dist. Branch, 
Tulare Co. Free Library, was estab- 
lished June 16, 1922. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

(Forty-sixth class.) 

County seat, Sonora. 
Area, 2292 sq. mi. Pop. 7768. 
Assessed valuation $11,566,968 (tax- 
able for county $8,515,256). 

Tuolumne Co. Free Library, Sonora. 
Miss Helen M. Rowland, Lib'n. 

Miss Margaret Bates has resigned the 
custodianship of the Tuolumne Branch of 
the Tuolumne County Free Library. Mrs 
W. B. Healy has been appointed to take 
her place. Mr R. C. Caukin of the Big 
Creek Camp of the Hetch Hetchy Dam- 
site project at Groveland has been ap- 
pointed custodian in place of A. Meagher. 

All the school books have been moved 
into the room adjoining the County Li- 
brary which the Board of Supervisors re- 
cently fitted up with shelving. Several 



Vol. 17, 110. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES QUARTERLY NEWS ITEMS. 



297 



TUOLUMNE CO.— Continued. 

shelves will be reserved in the main room 
for the teachers and these will contain 
samples of all the books on teaching'. 
textbooks, charts, etc. stored in the other 
room. This seems a more accessible and 
attractive way to exhibit the supplemen- 
tary material. 

Miss Edna Holroyd of San Mateo 
County Free Library visited Sonora and 
the library one week-end in May. 

Helen M. Rowland, Lib'n. 

Big Creek. 

Big Creek Branch. Tuolumne Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Tuolumne Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Tuolumne. 

Tuolumne Branch, Tuolumne Co. 
Free Library. 

See note under Tuolumne County Free 
Library. 

VENTURA COUNTY. 

(Thirty-third class.) 

County seat, Ventura. 
Area, 1S50 sq. mi. Pop. 28,724. 
Assessed valuation $49,443,641 (tax- 
able for county $43,396,706). 

Ventura Co. Free Library, Ventura. 
Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

The custodian at Boney Mountain is 
leaving. His sister, Miss Zarilda Ingram, 
takes his place. The Fillmore Branch Li- 
brary has moved into new quarters. The 
library is now on the ground floor in a 
newly-built store building with good dis- 
play windows and excellent ventilation and 
light. The custodian's salary has been 
raised to $48 a month. The Kuights of 
Pythias have presented the library with 
two delightful lounging chairs. The Moor- 
park Branch Library is being used so 
much as a reading room that it was de- 
cided to open it Thursday evening as well 
as Saturday. Miss Mabel Catlin is acting 
as custodian of Saticoy Branch while Miss. 
Smith is taking a trip to Yakima. Miss 
Beatrice Hantover is the new custodian at 
Somis. She is doing good work in getting 
the boys and girls interested in the books. 
4—19908 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 

Miss Aileen McCardkss of the main 
office staff is resigning to enter the Univer- 
sity of California. Miss Phyllis Wise 
takes her place. 

The County Board of Education of Ven- 
tura County has made a ruling that the 
books for recreational reading in the 
schools shall be chosen from those listed 
in the Wilson's Children's Catalog or its 
supplements. This is to aid the library in 
refusing the unsuitable adult books so 
often requested. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

Boney Mountain 
(P. O. Newbury Park; no exp. office). 
Boney Mountain Branch, Yestura 
Co. Free Library. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Fillmore. 

Fillmore Branch, Ventura Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Moorpark. 

Moorpark Branch, Ventura Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Oxnard. 

Oxnard [Free] Public Library. 
Miss Ethel Carroll, Lib'n. 

The bonds, for the library addition car- 
ried by a four-to-one majority at the elec- 
tion May 8. Plans are being prepared by 
Mr Alfred F. Priest of Los Angeles and 
will consist of an extension to the rear of 
the building on a lot purchased for this 
purpose several years ago. The ceilings 
are to be raised and a mezzanine floor 
built over the entire rear of the building. 
It is hoped that the actual construction 
will be begun by the first of Angust. 

Ethel Carroll, Lib'n. 

Santa Paula. 

Dean Hobbs Blanciiard Memorial 
[Free Public] Library. Miss Mary 
Boynton, Lib'n. 

In an attempt to find out what technical 
and scientific books would be of use to this 



298 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 

Santa Paula — Continued. 

community, we sent out lists of about 150 
titles each to the business houses and shops 
of Santa Paula. We also sent them to 
the Edison Club and to the oil wells where 
they were checked by a large number of 
men. We asked each man to check the 
lists to indicate the books he would be 
interested in. The result was very inter- 
esting, and by means of it we were able to 
place an order for about 75 titles. 

The Board of Trustees of the library has 
increased the length of the annual vaca- 
tion of the librarian and her assistants 
from two to four weeks. 

We are now allowing the full privileges 
of the library to all people, living outside 
the city and union high school district, on 
a deposit of $2 which will be refunded on 
the surrender of the privilege. 

Mary Boynton, Lib'n. 

Saticoy. 

Saticoy Branch, Ventura Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Somis. 

Somis Branch, Ventura Co. Free 
Library. 

See note under Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. 

Ventura. 

Ventura [Free] Public Library 
and Branch, Ventura Co. Free Li- 
brary. Miss Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

The Ventura P. T. A. is doing special 
reading along the lines of child training 
this summer. They have had reading lists 
made, and have special shelves set aside 
for them. 



VENTURA CO.— Continued. 
Ventura — Continued. 

Miss Leila Taylor has given her private 
music library to the City Library. This 
includes fourteen books which contain one 
hundred thirty songs. Besides these there 
are operas, oratorios and masses. 

Mrs Henry H. Neel has presented to the 
ibrary "A journal of the route to Alta Cal- 
ifornia performed by the Rev Isaac Foster 
of Plainfield, 111." The date is March 26, 
1849. The journal is very interesting be- 
cause of the accounts kept in one part of 
it. The prices of goods form a contrast 
to those of the present day. 

Elizabeth R. Topping, Lib'n. 

YOLO COUNTY. 

(Thirty-fourth class.) 

County seat, Woodland. 
Area, 1017 sq. mi. Pop. 17,105. 
Assessed valuation $31,309,761 (taxable 
for county $26,385,800') . 

Volo Co. Free Library, Woodland. 
Miss Nancy C. Laugenour, Lib'n. 

Miss Dora McKinlay, who resigned her 
position in the Ventura County Free Li- 
brary, was appointed cataloger in Yolo 
County Free Library beginning May 15, 
1922, to succeed Miss Blanche Chalfant, 
who resigned to accept the position as 
liorarian of Butte County Free Library. 
Nancy C. Laugenour, Lib'n. 



YUBA COUNTY. 

(Fortieth class.) 

County seat, Marysville. 
Area, 625 sq. mi. Pop. 10,375. 
Assessed valuation $19,961,953 (taxable 
for county $17,012,195). 



VOl. 17, 110. 3] DIRECTORY OF LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



299 



DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS 
OF GENERAL INTEREST. 



Many public libraries waste a great 
deal of time and money before they find 
good places to get supplies. The plan is 
to give all libraries the benefit of the 
experience of the older libraries of the 
State by listing under different heads the 
houses that have been found to give sat- 
isfaction, the names and addresses being 
furnished by the older and larger libraries 
of California. In this way suggestions 
will be given as to where different sorts 
of books may be bought, where books may 
be rebound or periodicals bound, where 
library furniture may be bought, etc., 
both in California and in the East. 

If any information is needed about the 
firms listed below, which can not be ob- 
tained from the firms themselves, the 
names of the libraries recommending the 
different ones will be sent to any library 
upon application to the State Library. 

SUPPLIES. 
Amateur Plays. 
Acting Dbamas foe Amateubs. 

The Book Den, 464 Eighth St., Oakland, 
Calif. 

A. L. A. 
Booklist. 

78 E. Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

Catalog. 
1904 ed. $1. 

Superintendent of Documents, Govern- 
ment Printing Office, Washington, 
D. C. 
1904-11 ed. $1.50. 

A. L. A. Pub. Board, 78 E. Washing- 
ton st., Chicago, 111. 
Headquabtebs and Publishing Boabd, 
78 E. Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

Binding and Mending. 
Binding. 

Foster & Futernick Co., 39 Battery st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 460 Fourth st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pacific Library Binding Co., 210 E. 

Washington st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sacramento Bookbindery, 309 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 
Silvius and Schoenbackler, 423 J St., 

Sacramento, Calif. 
Mending. 

Stix Co., San Jose. 

Stix-Parchment mending tissue. 



Blind. 

Embossed books, etc. Addresses will 
be furnished by the State Library. 

Book Cases. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Packing Bags. 

Hoegee Co., 138-142 S. Main st., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 

Book Packing Boxes. 

Pacific Box Factory, 2600 Taylor st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Corrugated paper cartons. 

Illinois-Pacific Glass Co., 15th and 

Folsom sts., San Francisco, Calif. 
Richardson-Case Paper Co., 1021 Front 
st, Sacramento, Calif. 

Book Plates. 

Manhattan Photogravure Co., 142 West 

27th st, New York, N. Y. 
Sequoyah Studio, 319 42d st., Oakland, 

Calif. 
Times-Mirror Printing & Binding 

House, 118 S. Broadway, Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Western lithograph Co., 600-610 E. 

Second st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Book Pockets. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Hicks-Judd Co., 460 Fourth st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Southern California Distributors) , 

610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 

Sacramento, Calif. 



300 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



Book Pockets — Continued. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

The Zellerbach Paper Co., 534 Battery 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Book Stacks, Metal Furniture, Etc. 

Art Metal Construction Co., James- 
town, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

J. Niederer Co., 3409 S. Main st., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

Van Horn Iron Works Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market St., 
San Francisco. Calif. 

Book Supports, Bracket and Pedal for 
Perforating Stamp and Other Me- 
chanical Appliances. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Southern California Distributors), 
. 610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Books. 

Baker & Taylor Co., 354 4th ave., New 
York City. 

Emporium, 835-865 Market st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Hiruebaugk & Browne, 471 Fifth ave., 
New York, N. Y. 

H. R. Huntting Co., Springfield, Mass. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 330 E. Ohio st., Chicago, 111. 

McDevitt-Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st., 
New York City. 

Newbegin's, 358 Post st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Parker's Book Store (C. C. Parker), 
220 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Chas. Scribner's Sons, 5th ave. and 48th 
St., New York, N. Y. 



Books — Continued. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
Union Library Association, 225 Fifth 

ave., New York City. 
Vroman's Book Store, 60 E. Colorado 

st., Pasadena. 
Harr Wagner, 1112 Hearst Bldg., San 

Francisco, Calif. 

Especially western books by western authors. 

White House, Sutter st., bet. Grant ave. 
and Kearny st., San Francisco, Calif. 

English Books and Publications. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 

Foreign Books and Publications in 
Various Languages. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
Lemcke & Buechner, 30-32 East Twen- 
tieth st., New York City. 

French. 

French Book Store, Alfred Blanc & J. 
Delabriandais, 324 Stockton st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 
J. Terquem, 19 Rue Scribe, Paris, 
France. 

Italian. 
A. Cavalli & Co., 255 Columbus ave., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Spanish. 

Victoriano Suarez, Madrid, Spain. 

Law Books. 

Bancroft-Whitney Co., 200 McAllister 

st., San Francisco, Calif. 
Matthew-Bender & Co., 109 State st., 
Albany, N. Y. 

School Books. 

California School Book Depository, 571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Ginn & Co., 20 Second st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

A. C. McClurg & Co., Library Depart- 
ment, 330 E. Ohio st., Chicago, 111. 

Milton Bradley Co., 20 Second st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Owen Publishing Co., 681 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

White House, Sutter st, bet. Grant ave. 
and Kearny st., San Francisco, Calif. 



VOl. 17, no. 3] DIRECTORY OF LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



301 



Books — Continued. 
Second-Hand Books. 
McDevitt- Wilson's, Inc., 30 Church st, 

New York City. 
Mudie's Select Library, 30-34 New Ox- 
ford st., London, Eng. 
Powner's Book Store, 542 Spring St., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Henry Sotheran & Co., 140 Strand, 

London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 

st., New York, N. Y. 
B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar 

Square, London, W. C. 2, Eng. 
A. R. Womrath, 15 E. 28th st, New 

York, N. Y. 

For used Action. 

Especially Calif omiana. 

Dawson's Book Shop, 518 S. Hill st., 

Lob Angeles, Calif. 
F. M. De Witt, 1609 Telegraph ave., 

Oakland, Calif. 
Holmes Book Co., 104 Market st., San 

Francisco, Calif. 

Cabinets. 

See Fuknituee and Supplies. 

Catalog Cards. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
G10 S. Main St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co.. 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st, Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Charts. 

H. S. Crocker & Co., 565-571 Market 
st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Clippings. 
Allen's. Press Clipping Bureau, 121 
Second st., San Francisco, and 626 
S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 



County Free Library Signs. 

For information, write Mrs Frances 
Burns Linn, Santa Barbara County 
Free Library, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Cutter Tables, Size Rulers, Etc. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Duplicating Appliances. 

Dandy Duplicator. 

Dodge & Dent, New York, N. Y. 

Edison Rotary Mimeograph. 

H. S. Crocker Co. (Agents), 565-571 
Market st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Filing Cases. 

See Furniture and Supplies. 

Films. 

For Rent. 

American Red Cross, Pacific Division, 

Larkin and McAllister sts., San 

Francisco, Calif. 
Pathe Exchange, Inc., Non-Theatrical 

Dept, 9S5 Market st., San Francisco, 

Calif. 
United States Forest Service, Ferry 

bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 
University of California, Extension 

Division, Berkeley, Calif. 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Grimes-Stassforth Stationery Co., 737- 
739 S. Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 

McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 
Southern California Distributors), 
610 S. Main St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Desk Co., 677 Mission 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rucker-Fuller Sales Co., 510 J st., 
Sacramento, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Yawman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 
132-140 Sutter st., San Francisco, 
and 727 S. Spring st, Los Angeles, 
Calif. 



302 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



Furniture and Supplies — Continued. 
Filing Cases for Music. 

Los Angeles Desk Co., 848 S. Hill st., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Globes. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K St., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st. 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazine Binders. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Elbe File and Binder Co., 215-217 

Greene st, New York, N. Y. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Gem Binder Co., 65 W. Broadway, 

New York. 
Wm. G. Johnston & Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 
McKee & Wentworth (Library Bureau 

Southern California Distributors), 

610 S. Main st, Los Angeles, Calif. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co., (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market st, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Magazines. 
Sec Periodicals. 

Maps. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Rand-McNally Co., 125 E. Sixth st, 
Los Angeles, and 559 Mission st., San 
Francisco, Calif. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 985 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Music. 

Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sut- 
ter sts., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. Schirmer, 3 E. 43d st, New York, 
N. Y. 

Pamphlets and Multi-Binders and 

Pamphlet Boxes. 
Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 
Gaylord Bros., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Pasting Machines. 
A. G. Prior, 136 Liberty st., New York, 
N. Y. 



Perforating Stamps. 
B. F. Cummins Co., Chicago, 111. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 
st, San Francisco, Calif. 

Periodicals. 

Back Volumes and Numbers. 

F. W. Faxon Co., 83-91 Francis st., 
Back Bay, Boston, Mass. 

F. M. De Witt, 1609 Telegraph ave., 
Oakland, Calif. 

International Magazine Co., 339 Bay 
Way North, Elizabeth, N. J. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 
St., New York, N. Y. 

H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 
ave., New York City. 

Subscription Agencies. 

John A. Clow, 2925 N. Lake ave., 
Pasadena, Calif. 

Franklin Square Agency, Franklin 
Square, New York City. 

Moore-Cottrell Subscription Agencies, 
North Cohocton, N. Y. 

Mutual Subscription Agency, 602 Cro- 
zer Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Purnell Stationery Co., 915 K st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

San Francisco News Co., 747 Howard 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

G. E. Stechert & Co., 151-155 W. 25th 
st., New York, N. Y. 

Sunset Subscription Agency, 631 Cham- 
ber of Commerce Bldg., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

H. W. Wilson Co., 958-64 University 
ave., New York City. 

Pictures. 

Braun & Co., Dornach, Alsace, France. 
Toni Landau Photo Co., 1 E. 45th st, 

New York, N. Y. 
(Formerly Berlin Photographic Co.) 
Curtis & Cameron, Copley Square, 

Boston, Mass. 

Especially for reproduction of American art. 

Perry Pictures Co., Maiden, Mass. 
Vickery, Atkins & Torrey, 550 Sutter 
st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Rubber Stamps and Type. 
Chipron Stamp Co., 224 West First st, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
Los Angeles Rubber Stamp Co., 131 S. 

Spring st., Los Angeles, Calif. 




VOl. 17, no. 3] DIRECTORY OF LIBRARY SUPPLIES, ETC. 



303 



Rubber Stamps and Type — Continued. 

Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

st., San Francisco, Calif. 

Sleeper Stamp Co., 528 J st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks-Morse & Co., 651 Mission st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Shelf Label- Holders. 

Democrat Printing Co., Madison, Wis. 

F. W. Wentworth & Co. (Library Bu- 
reau Distributors), 539 Market St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Signs. 

Dromgold-Scbroeder Co., 1033 S. Los 

Angeles st., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Sam H. Harris, 631 S. Spring st., Los 

Angeles, Calif. 
Moise-Klinkner Co., 365-369 Market 

st., San Francisco, Calif. 
Tablet & Ticket Co., 604 Mission st., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Slides. 

Geo. Kanzee, 12 Geary st., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Stamp Afh'xers. 

Multipost Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Steel Stacks. 

See Book Stacks. 

Stereoscopic Views. 

Keystone View Co., Meadville, Pa. 

Philip Brigandi (Agent Keystone View 
Co. and Underwood & Underwood), 
1618 North Hobart blvd., Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Willis E. Case (Agent Keystone View 
Co. and Underwood & Underwood), 
1610 Grove st., Berkeley, Calif. 

Typewriter Ribbons. 

L. & M. Alexander, 444 Market st., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Remington Typewriter Co., 240 Bush 
st., San Francisco, 424 S. Spring st., 
Los Angeles, and 1127 9th st, Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 

Typewriter Inspection Co., 426 S. 
Spring st, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Underwood Typewriter Co., 531 Market 
st., San Francisco, 430 S. Broadway, 
Los Angeles, and 611 J st., Sac- 
ramento, Calif. 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY SCHOOLS. 

Los Angeles Library School. For full 
information, write to Librarian, Public 
Library, Los Angeles, California. 

Riverside Library Service School. 
For full information write to Librarian, 
Public Library, Riverside, California. 

University of California Course in Li- 
brary Methods. For full information 
write to Librarian, University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley, Calif. 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

The officers of the American Library 
Association for 1922-23 are as follows : 

George B. Utley, Librarian, Newberry 
Library, Chicago, President. 

Miss Josephine A. Rathbone, Vice- 
director Pratt Institute Library School, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1st Vice-President. 

Malcolm G. Wyer, Librarian, Nebraska 
University Library, Lincoln, Neb., 2d Vice- 
President. 

Carl H. Milam, Chicago, Secretary. 

Edward D. Tweedell, Assistant Li- 
brarian, The John Crerar Library, Chi- 
cago, Treasurer. 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
STATE LIBRARIES. 

The officers of the National Associa- 
tion of State Libraries for 1922-23 are as 
follows : 

Mrs Jessie P. Weber, Librarian, Illinois 
State Historical Society Library, Spring- 
field, 111., President. 

Herbert S. Hirshberg, Librarian, Ohio 
State Library, Columbus, Ohio, Vice- 
President. 

Herbert O. Brigham, Librarian, Rhode 
Island State Library, Providence, R. I., 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the Pacific Northwest Li- 
brary Association for 1921-22 are as fol- 
lows : 

Judson T. Jennings, Librarian, Seattle 
Public Library, Seattle, Wash., President. 

Miss Anne M. Mulheron, Librarian, 
Portland Library Asociation Library, 
Portland, Ore., 1st Vice-President. 



304 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



Pacific Northwest Library Association 

— Continued. 

Miss Pauline Madden, Librarian, Chou- 
teau County Free Library, Fort Bentoa, 
Mont., 2d Vice-President. 

M. H. Douglass, Librarian, University of 
Oregon Library, Eugene, Ore., Secretary. 

Miss Elena A. Clancey, Head of Order 
Dept., Tacoma Public Library, Taconia, 
Wash.. Treasurer. 

The Pacific Northwest Library Associa- 
tion is to meet at Olympia, Washington, 
August 30, 31 and September 1. Cali- 
fornia having been invited to send a 
speaker, the County Librarians' Associa- 
tion of California selected Miss Cornelia 
D. Provines, Librarian of the Sacramento 
County Free Library, as its representative. 

LIBRARY WORKERS ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the Library Workers 
Association for 1921-22 are as follows : 

Catherine Van Dyne, National Work- 
men's Compensation Service Bureau, New 
York City, President. 

Marian C. Manley, Public Library, 
Sioux City, Iowa, Secretary. 

Carl L. Cannon, Public Library, New 
York City, Treasurer. 

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION. 

The officers of the School Library Asso- 
ciation for 1921-22 are: 

Northern Section — P resident. Miss 
Elizabeth Dorn, Alameda High School. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Florence M. 
Raker, Technical High School. Oakland. 

For 1922-23: 



California School Library Association 
— Continued. 

Southern S e c t i o n — President, Mrs 
Gretchen Boyle, Huntington Park High 
School Library. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Margaret 
Glassey, Polytechnic High School Library, 
Los Angeles. 

CALIFORNIA ^TATE LIBRARY 

SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Officers. 

Mrs Marion S. Percival, '15, President. 
Miss Ellen B. Frink, '19, Vice-presi- 
dent. 

Miss Bessie B. Heath, '19, Secretary- 
treasurer. 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The State Library is ready to 
register all library workers in California 
who are looking for positions and all 
from outside the state who wish to come 
here. Also it will be glad to know of 
libraries that want head librarians or 
assistants in any branch of their work. 
In writing for recommendations, libraries 
are urged to be as specific as possible, 
especially in regard to time position must 
be filled and salary offered. For further 
information, write to the State Library, 
Sacramento, California. 

"CALIFORNIA IN PRINT." 

The Los Angeles Public Library has 
several hundred copies of a California list 
which it issued last year. Its price will be 
5 cents to librarians, though its usual price 
is 10 cents. 

Address Everett R. Perry, Los Angeles 
Public Library, Los Angeles, California. 



SCHOOL LIBRARY STATISTICS. 

(From reports of County Superintendents of Schools, 1920-21.) 

Total school districts 3,750 

Elementary 3,407 

High 343 

Total expended for books for elementary schools $314,965 

Total expended for books for high schools $895,331 

Total volumes in elementary schools 2,813,172 

Total volumes in high schools 752,313 



Vol. 17, no. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



305 



CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



OFFICERS. 

President, Susan T. Smith. City Li- 
brary. Sacramento. 

Vice-President, Jeannette M. Drake. 
Public Library. Pasadena. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Hazel Gibson, Sac- 
ramento County Free Library, Sacramento. 

Trustees Section. 

President. F. H. Pettingell. Trustee 
Public Library. Los Angeles. 

Secretary, Mrs Katherine G. Smith, 
Trustee Public Library. Los Angeles. 

Municipal Libraries Section. 
President. Mrs F. II. Manker. Public 
Library. Upland. 

COMMITTEES. 

The Committees and the rest of the Dis- 
trict Officers will be announced in the 
October issue of News Notes of California 
Libraries. 

DISTRICT OFFICERS AND 
DISTRICTS. 

First District. 

President. Celia A. Hayward, Public 
Library, Berkeley. 

Secretary, 

The first district consists of the follow- 
ing cities : San Francisco, Alameda. Berke- 
ley. Oakland ; and the following libraries : 
Leland Stanford Junior University Li- 
brary and Margaret Carnegie Library. 
Mills College. 

Second District. 

President. Mrs Ora M. Regnart. San 
Benito County Free Library, Hollister. 

Secretary, 

The second district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Alameda (excepting Ala- 
meda. Berkeley, and Oakland), Contra 
Costa, Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo. 
Santa Clara (excepting Stanford Univer- 
sity), Santa Cruz. 



Third District. 

President, Mrs Elizabeth Cyrus Wright, 
Public Library, Calistoga. 

Secretary, 

The third district consists of the fol- 
lowing couuties : Lake, Marin. Mendo- 
cino. Napa, Solano, Sonoma. 

Fourth District. 

President, Eleanore Kyle, Kings County 
Free Library, Hanford. 

Secretary, Marion Gregory, Kings 
County Free Library, Hanford. 

The fourth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties : Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, 
Madera. Mariposa, Merced, Stanislaus. 
Tulare. Tuolumne. 



Fifth District. 

President, Frances M. Burket, Amador 
County Free Library, Jackson. 

Secretary. 1 lorence E. White. City Li- 
brary. Sacramento. 

The fifth district consists of the follow- 
ing counties : Alpine. Amador, Calaveras, 
El Dorado, Mono. Nevada, Placer. Sacra- 
mento, San Joaquin, Yolo. 



Sixth District. 

President, Katherine D. Kendig. Public- 
Library, Santa Barbara. 

Secretary. 

The sixth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Imperial. Los Angeles, 
Orange. Riverside, San Bernardino. San 
Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara. 
Ventura. 

Seventh District. 

President, Ruth Fleming, Humboldt 
State Teachers' College Library. Areata. 

Secretary, Virginia H. Todd. Public Li- 
brary. Areata. 

The seventh district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Del Norte, Humboldt. 



306 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



Eighth District. 

President, Lenala A. Martin, Lassen 
County Free Library, Susanville. 

Secretary, Carmelita Duff, Plumas 
County Free Library, Quincy. 

The eighth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, 
Sierra. 

Ninth District. 

President, Elizabeth Stevens, Tehama 
County Free Library, lied Bluff. 

Secretary, Ella Packer, Colusa County 
Free Library, Colusa. 

The ninth district consists of the fol- 
lowing counties : Butte, Colusa, Glenn, 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, 
Yuba. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

For an account of the annual meeting, 
see this publication, p. 253. 

First District Meeting. 

The members of the First District of 
the California Library Association gath- 
ered at Mills College on Saturday, May 20, 
1922. The district president, Mrs Eliza- 
beth G. Potter presided. There was a 
short business meeting, at which Mrs 
Elizabeth G. Potter was elected nominator 
for the First District, with Charles S. 
Greene as alternate. 

Mrs Lucy Lockwood Hazard, a member 
of the faculty of Mills College, spoke on 
the work of James Branch Cabell. She 
discussed "Jurgen" fully, his other books 
more briefly, all her estimates showing 
thoughtful study and keen appreciation of 
his genius. 

Dr Mary Roberts Coolidge, also of the 
faculty of Mills College, followed Mrs 
Hazard with an interesting discussion of 
some of the recent vital books in her special 
field of sociology, emphasizing the newer 
ones on immigration and their importance 
because of the changed conditions since 
1914. 

Luncheon was served in Warren Olney 
Hall to about fifty members and guests. 
The tables were decorated with roses from 
the college gardens. 

After luncheon Dr Mary Floyd Williams 
spoke on "Early California Literature," 
using her own bibliography as an outline 
for her talk. She mentioned many rare 



and important books, interpersing amusing 
anecdotes of the early days. 

John Howell added some interesting de- 
tails on early Californiana and then took 
up the Bender collection of rare books and 
manuscripts. A number of the books had 
been brought over from the library and, 
when Mr Howell had discussed these, the 
meeting adjourned to the library, where 
Mr Howell continued his informal talk 
while tea was served to the guests. 

The music for the afternoon was gener- 
ously contributed by Miss Catherine M. 
Urner, a member of the Mills College 
faculty, and five of her students. They 
sang three groups of charming folk songs 
and old ballads. Everyone enjoyed the 
lovely songs and the quaint costumes of the 
singers. 

Gladys English, Secretary. 

Third District Meeting. 

A meeting of the Third District of the 
California Library Association was held 
May 20, 1922, at the San Rafael Public 
Library. In the absence of Miss Christal 
Fox, president of the district, Miss Clara 
B. Dills presided. Miss Ruth Hall, the 
secretary, being absent, Miss Minnie C. 
Shreve was asked to take the minutes. 

A telegram was read from Miss Althea 
Wfarren, president of the association, send- 
ing her greetings and an invitation to the 
meeting of the California Library Asso- 
ciation to be held at Coronado, June 12 
to 15. 

There was an informal discussion of the 
certification of librarians and of the pro- 
gress made by the committee having that 
matter in charge. 

Miss Sybil Nye was elected nominator 
and Miss Estella De Ford alternate for the 
Coronado meeting. 

A communication was read from the San 
Antonio Library Club requesting our ap- 
proval of a resolution to amend the con- 
stitution and by-laws of the California 
Library Association, so that the district 
presidents shall be elected instead of ap- 
pointed. After an informal discussion it 
was decided to lay the matter on the table 
for consideration at a later meeting. Feel- 
ing that the chief objection to our present 
system was that the members of the dis- 
trict so often do not know who is their 



VOl. 17, no. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



307 



president, a resolution was passed asking 
the president of the California Library 
Association to notify the members of the 
district as soon as convenient of the name 
of the district president. 

The formal part of the meeting closed 
with a discussion of the different methods 
of accessioning books. 

There followed a short account by Miss 
Dills of her trip to the Orient, and a 
pleasant hour at Hotel Rafael. 

Minnie C. Shbeve, 
Acting Secretary. 

Fourth District Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the Fourth Dis- 
trict of the California Library Association 
was held in Fresno, Saturday, April 8, 
1922, at the Blue Triangle Court, the very 
attractive home of the Young Women's 
Christian Association. Greetings from 
the district president, Miss Sarah B. Mc- 
Cardle, opened the morning session, after 
which the minutes of the last meeting were 
read and approved. 

The procedure of the printed program 
was slightly altered, Mrs Jack's exquisite 
rendering of two Indian songs, most sym- 
pathetically accompanied by Miss Lorena 
James, being given precedence over the 
business meeting. 

Miss Althea Warren, president of the 
Association, gave an impromptu address, 
briefly outlining the program for the next 
annual. meeting to be held at Coronado in 
June. 

In reply to a communication from the 
San Antonio Library Club, requesting the 
endorsement by the District of a proposed 
amendment to the constitution of the Cali- 
fornia Library Association, whereby each 
district should be allowed to elect its own 
president, Mrs Julia G. Babcock made the 
following motion : "Members of the Fourth 
District shall retain their present method 
of securing district presidents." This 
motion was seconded and carried, upon 
being put to vote. By unanimous consent, 
Miss McCardle was then declared nomin- 
ator to the annual meeting of the associa- 
tion 

Miss Julia Steffa and Miss Winifred 
Bigley of the resolutions committee pre- 



sented the following resolution, which was 
endorsed by all present : 

Whereas, It has pleased God in His in- 
finite wisdom to call to Himself one of our 
number, Mary Ella Glock, who had been 
associated with us in the development of 
the library interests in our valley and espe- 
cially those of Madera County where she 
served as Librarian from July, 1917, to 
the time of her death on March 6, 1922, 
and 

Whereas, Her death has brought a feel- 
ing- of deep bereavement to all librarians 
and those who had known her ; be it 
therefore 

Resolved, That we, the members of the 
Fourth District of the California Library 
Association, do hereby express our deep 
sympathy and regret at the loss which the 
Association has sustained, and 

Whereas, In the recent death of Miss 
Nancy Duggan, former assistant in the 
Fresno County Free Library, we feel that 
the library profession has lost a true and 
valued member ; be it 

Resolved, That these resolutions be 
spread upon the minutes of this meeting 
and copies be sent to the bereaved families 
in whose sorrows we share. 

The business of the day being completed, 
four round tables were formed, at which 
were discussed advertising ; reference 
work ; public libraries and county library 
branches ; and department of school libra- 
ries. Presiding at these tables were Miss 
Bessie Silverthorn, Miss Gretchen Flower, 
Miss Julia Steffa, and Miss Anne Bell 
Bailey. 

At 12.30 luncheon was served in the 
dining room at the Blue Triangle Court. 

The afternoon session was opened by a 
most interesting address "American poets 
of the twentieth century," by George H. 
Huntting of the State Teachers College. 

The Aria Ensemble gave three musical 
numbers selected from the masters. 

"The school children and the library," 
was the title of an address by Frank W. 
Thomas of the State Teachers College, in 
which he dwelt at some length on the mod- 
ern movements in education which he be- 
lieved would have future bearing on the 
library. 

In "How a dream came true," Mrs Julia 
G. Babcock, librarian of Kern County 
Free Library, told of the work with chil- 
dren which is now being done in Kern 
County, a fulfilment of "A county libra- 
rian's dream," which she read at the 
Tahoe meeting of the Association. 



308 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



H. C. Peterson, collector of Californiana 
for the California State Library, gave a 
most entertaining account of his work in 
gathering historical records in the Bret 
Harte and Mother Lode country. As a 
direct result of his very fruitful findings, 
the largest and most important land mark- 
ing expedition ever formed in the history of 
America will be launched on May 19 of this 
year. The expedition will be under the 
supervision and direction of the Native 
Sons and Daughters and the Historical De- 
partment of the California State Library. 

A very full day was delightfully closed 
by the reading of some charming bits of 
poetry by their author. Miss Katharine 
Peirce, a member of the Yisalia Public Li- 
brary staff. 

There were eighty-seven in" attendance 
at the meeting, seven out of the nine coun- 
ties in the district being represented. 
Florence E. Robinson, Secretary. 



Fifth. District Meeting. 

'The meeting of the Fifth District of 
the California Library Association was 
held in Stockton on April 7, 1922, the 
morning session being held at the Stock- 
ton Public Library and the afternoon 
session in the auditorium of the Y. M. 
C. A. building. 

The meeting was called to order at 10.30 
o'clock by the district president, H. O. Par- 
kinson. The first speaker was Miss Irma 
Cole of the McHenry Public Library, 
Modesto. Ik,' topic was '"The Modesto 
Charging System," in which she told how 
the borrower's card is eliminated. 

This was followed by "Fiction selection 
as it might be" by Miss Bessie Silverthorn, 
librarian of the Stanislaus County Free 
Library. The vital point of her discourse 
was the tendency to get away from re- 
stricted books. Many of those present took 
part • in the discussion which followed, 
showing much interest in the subject. 

Miss Althea Warren, president of the 
association, outlined the program for the 
annual meeting to be held at Coronado in 
June, and spoke briefly of the work of the 
Certification Committee. 



At the close of the morning program, a 
brief business session was held, H. 0. Par- 
kinson being elected nominator for the 
district, with Miss Alice J. Haines as 
alternate. The following resolution pre- 
sented by the San Antonio Library Club 
was read and unfavorably voted upon -. 

Resolved, That we most earnestly peti- 
tion the California Library Association to 
amend the constitution and by-laws to 
allow each District to elect its own presi- 
dent at a regular District meeting, the date 
of assuming office to be the same as at 
present. 

The meeting then adjourned for luncheon 
at the Wave. 

The afternoon session opened with a 
quartet of singers, members of the Stock- 
ton Library staff, giving amusing parodies 
of library life. 

"The Press and the library" was dis- 
cussed by R. A. Rea, a representative of a 
local newspaper, who urged closer coopera- 
tion between libraries and the press. He 
suggested that every library have a press 
agent on the staff. 

"Methods of holding readers" was the 
subject of Miss Susan T. Smith's talk. 
She described methods of displaying books 
and interesting the public in them. 

Miss Cornelia D. Provines told of 
"Branch libraries in school buildings," 
problems and operations as applied to rural 
schools. 

Following Miss Provines' talk, H. C. 
Peterson, collector of Californiana tor the 
State Library, gave an illustrated lecture 
on "Marking the landmarks of the state." 
Many interesting views were thrown upon 
the screen. 

Angeline Oee, Secretary. 

Eighth District Meeting. 

A meeting of the Eighth District of the 
California Library Association was held on 
-June 12, 1922, at Coronado, during the 
annual meeting of the association, Miss 
Elizabeth C. Haines, the district president, 
presiding. 

There was an informal discussion of li- 
brary affairs in the district. Miss Haines 
was elected nominator from the district. 
Anna L. Williams, Secretary. 



VOl. 17, 110. 3] CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 



309 



Ninth District Meeting. 

A meeting' of the Ninth District, Cali- 
fornia Library Association was held at the 
Marysville Public Library on Saturday, 
April 22, 11)22, the district president Miss 
Edna Hewitt, presiding. 

The morning session was an informal 
round table discussion, followed by lun- 
cheon at the Western Hotel Grill. 

In the afternoon the music was in 
charge of Mrs H. J. Morley of Yuba 
City, with a talk on the work of the 
supervisor of music in the school by Mrs 
Norma Petro Harter. "Library publicity" 



was the subject of an address by L. K. 
Newfield, editor of the Sutter Independent. 
Miss Susan T. Smith of the Sacramento 
City Library spoke on "Modern fiction and 
its place in the library.'' 

Miss Edna Hewitt was elected nom- 
inator from the Ninth District, with Mrs 
Dorothy L. Worden as alternate. A 
motion prevailed in favor of holding the 
next meeting as a joint meeting of the 
Eighth, Ninth and Fifth Districts. 

After the meeting the women of the 
Marysville Art Club served tea. 

Patricia Lang, Secretary. 



310 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS, CALIFORNIA 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Milton J. Ferguson, State Librarian, 
Chairman. 

Robert Rea, Librarian, San Francisco 
Public Library, Secretary. 

Everett R. Perry, Librarian, Los An- 
geles Public Library. 

Sections 6 and 7 of the County free li- 
brary law (Chap. 68, Cal. Statutes 1911) 
read as follows : 

Sec. 6. A commission is hereby cre- 
ated to be known as the board of library 
examiners, consisting of the state libra- 
rian, who shall be ex officio chairman of 
said board, the librarian of the public 
library of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and the librarian of the Los 
Angeles public library. 

Sec. 7. Upon the establishment of a 
county free library, the board of super- 
visors shall appoint a county librarian, 
who shall hold office for the term of four 
years, subject to prior removal for cause, 
after a hearing, by said board. No per- 
son shall be eligible to the office of county 
librarian unless, prior to his appointment, 
he has received from the board of library 
examiners a certificate of qualification for 
the office. At the time of his appoint- 
ment, the county librarian need not be a 
resident of the county nor a citizen of the 
State of California. 

REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN. 

The Board of Library Examiners held 
an examination in Sacramento May 19 ani 
in Los Angeles June 10, 1922. Seventeen 
candidates were examined and certificates 
were issued as follows : Anne Bell Bailey 
(renewal), Arline Davis, Gladys English, 
K. Dorothy Ferguson, Hubert B. Frazier, 
Mrs Melissa Fuller, Blanche Galloway, 
Alice J. Haines (renewal), Jennie Herr- 
man, Mrs Ethelene M. Kitching, Faye T. 
Kneeshaw, Lenala A. Martin (renewal), 
Susan T. Smith (renewal), Mrs Dorothy 
Clarke Worden (renewal). 

The life of certificates expiring during 
1922 was extended to December 31, 1922. 

Renewals of certificates were granted to 
the following county librarians, holding 
first grade certificates expiring at the end 
of this year: Anne Hadden, Ida M. Rea- 
gan, Bessie B. Silverthorn, Julia Steffa, 
Minerva H. Waterman, Caroline S. 
Waters, Mrs Alice G. Whitbeck. The new 
certificate will then be issued to them. 



CERTIFICATE HOLDERS. 

Note. — First-grade certificates are valid 
for use throughout the state ; second grade, 
in counties of the twenty-first to the fifty- 
eighth (except twenty-fifth, thirty-third, 
thirty-fifth and forty-second) classes, in- 
clusive. Third-grade certificates, formerly 
issued for use in counties of the forty- 
ninth to the fifty-eighth classes, inclusive, 
are no longer issued. 

The new certificate, issued for the first 
time, December 22, 192 0, is valid for use 
throughout the state. 

First Grade. 

Babcock, Mrs Julia G., Ln. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Bigley, Winifred H., Ln. Merced County 

Free Library, Merced. 
Coulter, Mabel, Asst. Contra Costa County 

Free Library, Martinez. 
Culver, Bssae M., Asst. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
De Ford, Estella, Ln. Napa County Free 

Library, Napa. 
Dills, Clara B., Ln. Solano County Free 

Library, Fairfield. 
Flower, Gretchen L., Ln. Tulare County 

Free Library, Visalia. 
Hadden, Anne, Ln. Monterey County Free 

Library, Salinas. 
Hatch, Margaret, Ln. Standard Oil Co. Li- 
brary, San Francisco. 
Holroyd, Edna S., Ln. San Mateo Coun- 
ty Free Library, Redwood City. 
Morse, Marion, Ln. Maui County Free 

Library, Wailuku, T. H. 
Perry, Everett R., Ln. Public Library, Los 

Angeles. 
Provines, Cornelia D., Ln. Sacramento 

County Free Library, Sacramento. 
Reagan, Ida M., Ln. Humboldt County 

Free Library, Eureka. 
Silverthorn, Bessie B., Ln. Stanislaus 

County Free Library, Modesto. 
Steffa, Julia, Ln. Madera County Free 

Library, Madera. 
Suggett, Mrs Laura (Steffens), Mrs Allen 

H. Suggett, Ln. Sutro Branch, State 

Library, San Francisco. 
Waterman, Minerva H., Ln. Santa Cruz 

Public Library and Santa Cruz County 

Free Library, Santa Cruz. 
Waters, Caroline S.. Ln. San Bernardino 

County Free Library, San Bernardino. 
Whitbeck, Mrs Alice G., Ln. Contra Costa 

County Free Library, Martinez. 

New Certificate. 

Bailey, Anne Bell, Asst. Fresno County 

Free Library, Fresno. 
Barmby, Mary, Ln. Alameda County Free 

Library, Oakland. 
Beeman, Mrs Anne (Madison), Mrs 

Thomas Beeman, Ln. Imperial County 

Free Library, El Centro. 
Brackett, Thelma, Ln. Siskiyou County 

Free Library, Yreka. 
Brewitt, Mrs Theodora R., Asst. Ln. Pub- 
lic Library, Long Beach. 
Burket, Frances M., Ln. Amador County 

Free Library, Jackson. 
Chalfant, Blanche, Ln. Butte County Free 

Library, Oroville. 
Chatfield, Marguerite, Asst. Siskiyou 

County Free Library, Yreka. 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



BOARD OF LIBRARY EXAMINERS. 



311 



Chilberg, Marjorie J., Asst. Solano County 

Free Library, Fairfield. 
Davis, Arline, Asst. Orange County Free 

Library, Santa Ana. 
Dobell, Lila Grace, Ln. Trinity County 

Free Library, Weaverville. 
English, Gladys, Asst. Public Library, 

Berkeley. . 
Ferguson, K. Dorothy, Asst. Fresno 

County Free Library, Fresno. 
Ferguson, Milton J., Ln. State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Frazier, Hubert B., Asst. Public Library, 

Los Angeles. 
Frink, Ellen B., Asst. Monterey County 

Free Library, Salinas. 
Fuller, Mrs Melissa, Asst. Fresno County 

Free Library, Fresno. 
Galloway, Blanche, Asst. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Gibson, Hazel G.. Asst. Sacramento County 

Free Library, Sacramento. 
Gleason, Celia, Ln. Los Angeles County 

Free Library, Los Angeles. 
Greene, Charles S., Ln. Free Library, Oak- 
land. 
Gregory, Marion L., Asst. Kings County 

Free Library, Hanford. 
Haines, Alice J., Head Documents Dept., 

State Library, Sacramento. 
Hitt, Eleanor, Ln. San Diego County Free 

Library, San Diego. 
Huntington, S-tella, Ln. Santa Clara County 

Free Library, San Jose. 
Kitching, Mrs Ethelene M., Asst. -Public- 
Library, Long Beach. 
Kneeshaw, Faye T., Asst. San Diego 

County Free Library, San Diego. 
Kobler, Marjorie H., Asst. San Diego 

County Free Library, San Diego. 
Kyle, Eleanore, Ln. Kings County Free 

Library, Hanford. 
Laugenour, Nancy C, Ln. Yolo County 

Free Library, "Woodland. 
Linn, Mrs Frances Burns, Ln. Santa Bar- 
bara Free Public Library and Santa 

Barbara County Free Library, Santa 

Barbara. 
Livingston, Margaret E., Ln. Orange 

County Free Library, Santa Ana. 
McCardle, Sarah E., Ln. Fresno County 

Free Library, Fresno. 
Martin, Lenala A., Ln. Lassen County 

Free Library, Susanville. 
Middleton, Maude, Ln. Glenn County Free 

Library, "Willows. 
Mumm, Beulah, Reference Ln. State Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 
Packer, Ella, Asst. Colusa County Free 

Library, Colusa. 
Rea, Robert, Ln. Public Library, San 

Francisco. 
Smith, Susan T\, Ln. City Library, Sac- 
ramento. 
Stevens, Elizabeth, Ln. Tehama County 

Free Library, Red Bluff. 
Thomas, Mabel W., Asst. Ln. Free Li- 
brary, Oakland. 
Topping, Elizabeth R., Ln. Ventura 

County Free Library, Ventura. 
Vogleson, Helen E., Asst. Ln. Los Angeles 

County Free Library, Los Angeles. 
Warren, Althea H., Ln. Public Library, 

San Diego. 
Worden, Mrs Dorothy (Clarke), Mrs 
Charles J. Worden, Ln. Colusa County 

Free Library, Colusa. 



Second Grade. 

Bacon, Mrs Virginia C, Ln. Park College, 

Parkville, Mo. 
Dold, Margaret E., Asst. State Teachers 

College Library, San Francisco. 
Duff, Marcella Carmelita, Ln. Plumas 

County Free Library, Quincy. 
Encking, Louise F., Asst. Public Library, 

Seattle, Wash. 
Ewing, Marion J., Asst. Pomona College 

Library, Claremont. 
Faulkner, Mrs Mabel F., Asst. Riverside 

Public Library, Riverside. 
Gantz, Flo A., Ln. San Luis Obispo 

County Free Library, San Luis Obispo. 
Hewitt, Edna J., Ln. Sutter County Free 

Library, Yuba City. 
McCright, Edith C, Asst. Public Library, 

El Paso, Texas. 
McNeill, Norah. Ln. Public Library, Rich- 
mond. 
Margrave, Anne, Ln. Inyo County Free 

Library, Independence. 
Northey, Delia F., State School Library 

Supervisor, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Regnart, Mrs Ora M., Ln. San Benito 

County Free Library, Hollister. 
Rowland, Helen M., Ln. Tuolumne 

County Free Library. Sonora. 
Schaer, Mildred E., Asst. Public Library, 

Los Angeles. 
Thompson, Laura E., Asst. Public Library, 

Los Angeles. 
Wheaton, Florence J., Asst. Kern County 

Free Library, Bakersfield. 
Whitbeck, Josephine L., Asst. City Li- 
brary, Sacramento. 



Third Grade. 

Williams, Anna L., Ln. Modoc County 
Free Library, Alturas. 



At Present Out of Library Work. 

Alexander, Mrs Lela (Clapperton) (New 

certificate ) . 
De Witt, Mrs Isabelle (Park), Mrs Ralph 

E. De Witt (2d grade). 
Downey, Mrs Persis (Mclntire), Mrs 

Stephen W. Downey (2d grade). 
Ferris, Katharine Post (New certificate). 
Herrman, Jennie (New certificate). 
Jamieson, Mrs Dorothy (Henderson), 

Mrs Natt F. Jamieson (2d grade). 
Lewis, Mrs Anna Jean (Thomson), Mrs 

R. B. Lewis (New certificate). 
McMayburns, Mrs Hazel (Askey), Mrs 

Walter C. McMayburns (2d grade). 
Percival, Mrs Marion (Schumacher), Mrs 

H. Frederic Percival (2d grade). 
Price, Mrs Eunice (Steele), Mrs Jay H. 

Price (2d grade). 
Smith, Mrs Mary Pierce (2d grade). 
Twaddle, Mrs Bessie (Herrman) (1st 

grade). 
Work, Mrs Geraldine (Graham), Mrs 

George A. Work (2d grade). 
Yates, Mrs Bess (Ranton), Mrs John D. 
Yates (2d grade). 



312 



NEWS NOTES OP CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



COUNTY FREE LIBRARY LAW. 

The "California county free library law 
and circular of information for applicants 
for certificates of qualification to hold 
office of county librarian in California" 
was published in News Notes of Califor- 
nia Libraries, April, 1911, and later re- 
printed in pamphlet form. The edition 
being exhausted, a revised edition of the 
circular was printed in Neics Notes of 
California Libraries, January, 1914. This 
has been reprinted as a pamphlet. The 
fifth edition was issued December, 1921. 
(Circular of information only.) The 
fourth edition of the County free library 



law was also issued in December, 1921. 
Copies of both of above pamphlets will be 
furnished on request. 

NEXT EXAMINATION. 

No date has been set for the next exam- 
ination. 

APPLICATION BLANKS. 

All who wish to take the examination 
should file applications with the Chair- 
man of the Beard. For application blanks 
or further information address the Chair- 
man of the Board, Milton J. Ferguson, 
State Librarian, Sacramento, California. 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



313 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



The bill establishing the California 
State Library was signed by Governor 
Peter H. Burnett, January 24, 1850. 

California State Library School was 
established by resolution adopted Septem- 
ber 4. 1913. 

California State Library School was 
discontinued by motion adopted May 22, 
1920. 

Annual income for 1922-23, $152,950. 

Total accessions 237,491 (less 2981 lost 
and discarded = 234,510 ) exclusive of 
14,428 accessions in Books for the Blind 
Department, and of the Sutro Branch in 
San Francisco (estimated at about 122,569 
vols.). 

STAFF. 

Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian. 

Miss Mabel R. Gillis, Assistant Libra- 
rian and Head of Books for the Blind 
Department. 

Mrs Laura Steffens Suggett, Librarian, 
Sutro Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Essae M. Culver, Library Visitor 
and Instructor. 

Miss Eudora Garoutte, Head of Cali- 
fornia Department. 

Miss Alice J. Haines, Head of Docu- 
ments Department. 

Mrs May Dexter Henshall, County 
Library Organizer. 

Miss Annie Lowry, in charge of Period- 
icals and Binding. 

Wm. H. Lugg, Head of Shipping, Re- 
pairs, etc., Department. 

Miss Beulah Mumm, Reference Libra- 
rian. 

Miss Ida G. Munson, Head of Catalog 
Department. 

Joseph H. Quire, Law and Legislative 
Reference Librarian. 

Miss Myrtle Ruhl, in charge of Order 
Department. 

Miss Beryl Andrews, Assistant. 

Miss Joyce Backus, Assistant. 

Miss Helen M. Bruner, Assistant. 

Miss Alice Chenu, Assistant. 

Miss Ella A. Clark, Indexer. 

Miss Bennetta Colton, Assistant. 

Miss Anna Creaner, Assistant. 

Mrs Gerna R. Dickson, Assistant. 

Miss Kate M. Foley, Home Teacher of 
the Blind, Sutro Branch, California State 
Library, San Francisco. 

Miss Zilla Grant, Assistant. 

Miss Frances Haub, Assistant. 

Miss Bessie B. Heath, Assistant. 

Miss Margaret Kilgariff, Assistant. 



Miss Anita Knopf, Stenographer, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Florence Lamb, Bookkeeper. 

Miss Marie Lamont, Assistant, Sutro 
Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Rachel G. Look, Assistant. 

Miss Anna McAnear, Stenographer. 

Miss N. Rutb McCullough, Assistant. 

Miss Dorothy McGilvray, Assistant. 

Miss Beth Mclntire, Assistant. 

Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin, Assistant, 
Sutro Branch, San Francisco. 

Miss Laura M. Manhart, Assistant. 

Miss D. Florence Montfort, Assistant. 

Miss Catharine J. Morrison, Home 
Teacher of the Blind, 951 El Molino St., 
Los Angeles. 

H. C. Peterson, Collector of Californi- 
ana. 

Miss Mary V. Provines, Assistant. 

Miss Irene E. Ryan, Assistant. 

Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Assistant. 

Miss Grace Taylor, Assistant. 

Miss Lily Tilden, Assistant. 

Mrs Olive M. Treichler, Assistant. 

Miss Marguerite Walker, Stenographer. 

Miss Caroline Wenzel, Assistant. 

Miss Mae Davies, Book Repairer. 

Miss Emma F. de Merritt, Book Re- 
pairer. 

Mrs Thelma Foss, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Mae Moore, Book Repairer. 

Mrs Wilma Scott, Book Repairer. 

Wm. G. Lyons, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Wyman L. Pease, Assistant Shipping 
Clerk. 

Charles Tevis Edwards, Messenger. 

Angelena Grant, Messenger. 

Elenora Kaeuper, Messenger. 

Alice Miller, Messenger (Part-time). 

Louise Reynolds, Messenger. 

J. L. Foss, Janitor. 

G. A. Klees, Janitor. 

Albert Oughten, Truck Driver. 

R. N. Polmere, Janitor. 

Harry A. Simons, Elevator Operator. 

STAFF NEWS ITEMS. 
Miss Essae M. Culver was added to the 

staff April 1, filling the position of Library 
Visitor and Instructor. For the present, 
however, she is in the Reference Depart- 
ment. Miss Bennetta Colton severed her 
connection with the library April 30 but 
was again taken on the staff June 19. She 
was formerly one of the stenographers but 
is now in the Documents Department, 
filling the place left vacant by Miss Ernst's 
resignation. 



5—19908 



314 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



Miss Marion Anderson and Miss Lneile 
Ernst left us April 30 and Miss Kose But- 
ler June 30. Miss Anderson was married 
to Mr Frederick Lawson Adams May 20 
and they are making their home tempo- 
rarily at Exchequer, where Mr Adams is 
engaged in construction work. Miss Ernst 
was married to Dr Albert Johnson June 1. 
They reside in Sacramento. Miss Butler 
and Mr Wallace Williams were married 
June 30, and they also are for the present 
at Exchequer. Mrs Marion Schumacher 
a ercival assisted in the Reference Depart- 
ment from March 1 to April 30. Lincoln 
Fitzell, who had been with the library as 
messenger for four years, resigned June 24 
as he is to enter the University of Cali- 
fornia. 

Miss Irene Ryan is still on leave of 
absence, due to illness. However, she is 
now very much improved. 

On June 29 Mr Joseph H. Quire, head 
of the Law and Legislative Reference De- 
partment, was married to Miss Ruth 
Wadsworth of Hollywood. 

One of the outstanding features of the 
quarter was "Forty-nine Week," for the 
State Library followed the example of the 
city of Sacramento in turning the clock 
back seventy-three years. Most of the staff 
came to work that week attired in '49 cos- 
tumes. Even our time clock forgot to 
function during the week. Many snapshots 
were taken of various staff members in 
costume, and one large photograph of the 
grouped staff members was made. 

Immediately preceding "Forty - nine 
Week" was the Landmarking Expedition, 
under the auspices of the State Library 
and the Native Sons and Daughters of 
California. Mr Ferguson was unable to be 
away from the library at that time, so Mr 
Peterson represented our institution on 
this trip. The expedition started from 
Oakland May 19 and made a circuit of 
the old mining towns and other early-day 
places, putting up tablets at spols of his- 
toric interest, and swinging into Sacra- 
mento May 23, in time to assist in the 
opening of "Forty-nine Week." 

Mr Ferguson, Miss Gillis and about 
twenty of the staff attended the Fifth Dis- 
trict meeting of the California Library 
Association at Stockton, April 7. 

Mr Ferguson, Miss Haines, Mrs Hen- 
shall and Miss Mumm were the State Li- 



brary delegates to the California Library 
Association meeting June 12 to 10 at Cor- 
onado. Miss Mary Virginia Provines, 
Mrs Laura Steffens Suggett and Miss 
Rachel Look were also able to attend 
as vacations took them in that direction 

Mr Ferguson attended the American Li- 
brary Association meeting at Detroit as 
the State Library delegate and also as the 
delegate of the California Library Asso- 
ciation. Miss Culver, Miss Mumm and 
Miss Munson were also able to attend, and 
Miss Culver was especially in charge of 
California's part in the County Library 
Exhibit there. 

The librarian and staff of the State 
Library entertained the members of the. 
Sacramento County Free Library and the 
Sacramento Public Library, and Miss 
Elizabeth V. Clark, the librarian of the 
newly organized library of the State De- 
partment of Agriculture, at a picnic at Dei 
Paso Park on June 19. A burlesque track 
meet occupied the time before a picnic sup 
per was served and afterward everyone 
joined in songs led by a three - piece 
orchestra. 

LIBRARY HOURS. 

Week days 9 a.m. to 5 p.m 

Legislative session : 

Week days 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Sundays 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

The library will close at 4 p.m. during 
July and August. 

LAW AND LEGISLATIVE REFER- 
ENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Joseph H. Quiee, in charge. 

The Law and Legislative Reference 
Department is fully equipped with the 
latest reports, digests, encyclopedias and 
textbooks, the statutes of other states, the 
United States, Great Britain, Canada, 
Australia and certain other foreign coun- 
tries, and briefs of counsel in cases de- 
cided in the California Supreme and 
Appellate courts. State officers are en- 
titled to borrow books, and private indi- 
viduals are accorded the same privilege 
upon presentation of a request signed by 
a Supreme, Appellate or Superior Judge, 
or other state officer. Books may be kept 
three weeks, and will be once renewed 
for two weeks. All books are subject to 
recall, if required by a state officer. 

In addition to special service to mem- 
bers of the Legislature, information on 
the laws of California and other states 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



315 



and countries is given on inquiry from 
libraries or individuals. 

Recent accessions to the department 
will be found listed under the heading 
"Law" in the section on "Recent Acces- 
sions." 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT. 

Alice J. Haines, in charge. 

The Documents Department aims to 
collect, arrange and make available gov- 
ernment publications, federal, state, city 
and foreign. 

Recent accessions of California State 
and City publications will be found on 
pages 344, 349. 

Copies of 41 California state publica- 
tions have been received for distribution to 
libraries during April, May and June, 
1922: 

Adjutant General. Report for 1914 to 1920. 
Agriculture Dept. Monthly bul. v. 11, no 4. 
• Regulatory announcements, nos. 1, 

3, 4. 

Special publications, nos. 12, 13, 15, 

16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 24. 

California Polytechnic School. Bul., ser. 

4, no. 11. 

Civil Service Comm. Civil Service act, 

1922. 
Control Bd. Children's Dept. Rept.19 18-20. 
Controller. Rept. of financial transactions, 

1921. 

Inheritance tax act. 1922. 

Education Bd. Directory bulletin, 1921- 

22. 
Fish & Game Comm. Cal. fish & game, 

v. 8, no. 2. 
Industrial Accident Comm. Cal. safety 

news, v. 6, nos. 4—6. 

Bul. no. 11. 

Medical Examiners Bd. Directory of 

physicians and surgeons. March, 1922. 
Mining Bur. Monthly chapter of 18th rept. 

March-Ma v, 1922. 

■ Cal. oil fields, v. 7, nos. 8-10. 

Public Instruction Supt. Bul. nos. 1-B ; 

5-A; 5-B. 
Public Works Dept. Engineering Div. 

Bul. no. 1. 
Railroad Comm. Rept. 1920-21. 
Teachers College, Fresno. Sierra summer 

school, 1922. 
Teachers College, San Diego. Bul. v. 10, 

no. 1. 
Teachers College, San Francisco. Circular 

of information . . . regular teachers 

course. 1922. 

Junior high school certification. 

1922. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 

Beulaii Mumm, in charge. 

The Reference Department furnishes 
information to any inquirer. It furnishes 
books to public libraries on request of the 
librarian, and to any other educational 
institution on request of its official head 
or its librarian ; to individuals through the 
signature of a state officer, of the Li- 
brarian of the local library or of the 
official head of any other educational in- 
stitution or on receipt of a $5.00 deposit ; 



to a club or grange on request of its presi- 
dent, secretary or librarian. In counties 
having county free libraries, all requests 
must be made through the county free 
library. 

It seems well at this time to outline the 
State Library policy regarding the finan- 
cial side of our loans. 

Books borrowed through a city or a 
county library are sent prepaid and may 
be returned collect, except in the case of 
books for high school use in a high school 
not belonging to a county library accord- 
ing to the plan adopted at the High School 
Principals' Convention, April 13, 1918. 
Transportation on books borrowed by such 
schools is paid both ways by the high 
school. Books borrowed for other educa- 
tional institutions, such as State Teachers 
Colleges, Universities, etc., having their 
own library funds, are sent collect and are 
to be returned prepaid, except in cases of 
affiliation with county libraries. Books 
borrowed by individuals, where there. is no 
library through which they may borrow, 
are sent collect and must be returned pre- 
paid. 

ORDER AND ACCESSIONS 
DEPARTMENT. 

Myrtle Ruhl, in charge. 

During April, May and June 1002 
books, 9 prints and 3 maps were acces- 
sioned. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT. 

Ida G. Munson, in charge. 

During April, May and June 653 books 
were cataloged and 6372 cards were added 
to the file. 

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT. 

Eudora Garoutte, in charge. 

The California Department aims to 
have a thoroughly good collection of books 
on the history and description, resources 
and industries of the State, as well as the 
works of California authors in all de- 
partments of literature. These are made 
accessible by means of a card catalog. 
Full names and biographical sketches of 
California authors, artists, musicians, 
pioneers and early settlers are being 
secured, together with their photographs. 
The collection of bound periodicals is 
quite large. The Department also con- 
tains about 7000 bound volumes of news- 
papers, a file of which is being indexed 
with reference to the history of the State. 
Students will be assisted in their work. 



316 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



Pioneers and Early Settlers. 

Several cards of members of the 
Emanuel Salvador Vallejo family have 
been received. Both Mr and Mrs Vallejo 
were born in 1813, the former at Monterey 
and the latter at San Diego. Several of 
their children were born at the old town 
of Sonoma. Mrs Vallejo was one of the 
Carillo family. All were intimately con- 
nected with the Spanish-California period 
and also the early American period. 

Elias Field was for many years a prom- 
inent citizen of Calaveras County. Mi- 
Field crossed the plains in 1848. In the 
fifties he made two trips to the east by 
water. He was a miner and agriculturist 
and spent a busy life until he passed on in 
1908. Mrs Field came to California in 
1854 as a bride. Her grand-daughter, who 
filled out the card, pays her this tribute, 
"a true pioneer housewife and mother." 

Mrs Fannie Wallace (Washington) 
Reading came to California as a bride in 
1856. She was the wife of Pierson B. 
Reading who came to California in 1843 
and became one of the earliest settlers of 
northern California, having secured a 
large tract jf land, rancho Buena Ventura, 
in Shasta County. Mr Reading was active 
in the Bear Flag revolution and in the 
Mexican war, also Indian agent, in fact 
was a most active participant in Califor- 
nia's early and romantic history. Mrs 
Reading standing by his side and playing 
her part most nobly. 

California Authors. 

The following author cards have been 
received since the last issue of Nev.s Notes 
of California Libraries : 

Anderson, Ralph Parker 

Chalfant, Willie Arthur 

Cheney, Charles Henry 

Cox, Coleman 

Hankins, Arthur Preston 
♦Hemphill, Mrs Vivia (Hector) 
Mrs W. G. Hemphill 

Lucas, Mrs Bertha June (Richard- 
son) 

Mrs William Palmer Lucas 

O'Brien, Frederick 

Searing, Mrs Laura Catherine (Red- 
den) 

Mrs Edward W. Searing 

Trinka, Zena Irma 

Tully, Jim 



California Musicians. 

The following musician card has been 
received since the last issue of 'Neves Notes 
of California Libraries: 
Wallace, Oliver 

California Artists. 

The following artist cards have been 

received since the last issue of News Notes 

of California Libraries ; 

♦Reading, Alice Matilda 
Smith, Ernest Browning 

Newspaper Index. 

The index covers the period from 
August 15, 1846, to date. 

Catalog. 

Two hundred and forty-two cards have 
been added to the California catalog dur- 
ing the last quarter. 

Donations. 

Most of the recent donations to the 
department have been received through 
the efforts of Mr Peterson, in charge of 
Field Research. These collections will be 
written up at a later date. 

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND 
DEPARTMENT. 
Mabel R Gillis, in charge. 

Embossed books in the various types are 
sent to any blind resident in California 
upon application. Circular and finding- 
list, with Call sir) postal, will be sent on 
request. Writing appliances and games for 
the blind are loaned as samples to those 
wishing to buy such articles, so that the 
different kinds can be tried before they 
are ordered. Addresses of firms supplying 
all articles loaned will be furnished on 
request. 

Books sent to individuals from an insti- 
tution distributing embossed literature are 
carried free -through the mails. 

Embossed catalogs in American Braille, 
Moon, and New York point are now avail- 
able. They will be loaned to borrowers 
wishing them for use in book selection. 

The State Library will be glad to have 
borrowers who care to do so write any 
letters or requests for books to the Library 
in Braille or New York point. 



♦Native Californians. 






vol. 17, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



317 



The first book was loaned June 13, 1905. 
There are now 1788 blind borrowers, 78 
borrowers having been added during April, 
May and June. Total accessions are 
11,428 as follows : New York point books 
2342 ; New York point music 184 ; Ameri- 
can Braille books 2977 ; American Braille 
music 1171 ; European Braille books 207S ; 
European Braille music 152 ; Moon books 
3616 ; Moon music 5 ; Revised Braille 
Grade 1+ books 1093; Revised Braille 
Grade li music 108 ; Standard dot books 
16 ; Line books 192 ; Line music 21 ; Ink 
print books 312 ; * Appliances 82 ; *Games 
46 ; Maps 33. 

Home Teaching. 

Miss Foley, home teacher of the blind, 
is at the Sutro Branch of the State Li- 
brary, Sacramento and Webster streets, 
San Francisco, every Thursday from 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. She gives lessons regularly in 
Alameda, Berkeley,- Oakland, Palo Alto, 
San Bruno. San Jose, Santa Clara and 
other places in that vicinity. Miss Morrison 
home teacher of the blind, is at the Los 
Angeles County Free Library, Broadway 
Annex, Hall of Records, on Wednesday 
and Saturday afternoons from 1.30 until 
5.30 o'clock. She gives lessons regularly 
in Los Angeles and nearby places. 

From April 1 to June 30 they gave 350 
lessons in the homes of the blind and i<8 
lessons at the libraries and institutions on 
the 64 afternoons they spent in them. Miss 
Foley and Miss Morrison have made 148 
visits and calls in connection with the work 
for purposes other than giving lessons, and 
received 28 visits in connection with the 
work. 

During the quarter Miss Foley and Miss 
Morrison. spent 182 hours on correspond- 
ence and preparing lessons. They wrote 
315 letters and 177 postals and received 
223 letters and 21 postals. They also 
answered and made 3S0 telephone calls. 
They made 2 addresses. Miss Foley 
teaches regularly in Oakland and in San 
Francisco classes of seeing people to write 
Braille. The various other activities in 
connection with the work of the home 
teachers can not be easily tabulated. 

Copies of magazines have been donated 
during the Jast three months by Harry C. 
Alley, F. B. Beans, J. S. Bright, Mrs A. 
H. Clise, Mrs Anna Courtois, Miss Kate 



*Appliances and games are loaned as 
samples to anyone wishing to try them. 



M. Foley, Ruby Holtz, Mrs A. W. Joy, 
Miss Bessie Long, Mrs Rose McComb, 
Wm. A. Miller, John O'Donnell, Mrs M. 
E. Phillips, Mrs L. Sargent, George W. 
Shoemaker, Canadian National Institute 
for the Blind, Christian Record Publish- 
ing Co., Free Gospel Library for the 
Blind, Joseph Gockel, New York Associa- 
tion for the Blind, Society for the Aid of 
the Sightless, Western Pennsylvania 
institution for the Blind, Xavier Free 
Publication Society for the Blind, Ziegler 
Publishing Co. 

Other gifts are indicated in the list of 
books, etc., which have been added to the 
library during the last three months. See 
page 349. 

During April, May and June S4S0 books, 
etc., were loaned as follows : New York 
point 802; American Braille 976; Euro- 
pean Braille 1460 ; Moon 3637 ; Revised 
Braille Grade 1J 1577 ; Standard dot ; 
Line 9 ; Ink print books 10 ; Appliances 7 ; 
Maps 2 ; Games 0. The loans were divided 
by class as follows : Philosophy and re- 
ligion 6S9 ; sociology 57 ; language 57 ; 
primers 82 ; science 79 ; useful arts 84 ; 
fine arts ; amusements 1 ; music 145 ; lit- 
erature 278 ; fiction 5038 ; travel and 
history 585 ; biography 276 ; periodicals 
1109. 

Miss Foley attended the meeting of the 
American Association of Instructors of the 
Blind in Austin, Texas, and represented 
the State Library there. She conducted a 
Round Table on Home Teaching. In May 
she spoke at a staff meeting at the State 
Library in Sacramento and also at a meet- 
ing of the Medical Social Workers in San 
Francisco. 

In May Miss Morrison spent a week in 
San Diego where she took charge of the 
joint exhibit of the State Library and the 
California School for the Blind at the Cal- 
ifornia Conference of Social Work. 

Persons who know of possible pupils 
anywhere in Orange, Los Angeles or San 
Diego counties are urged to communicate 
with Miss Catharine J. Morrison, 951 
El Molino St., Los Angeles (telephone 
Wilshire 5339) ; and anywhere around the 
bay, with Miss Kate M. Foley, Sutro 
Branch, State Library, Sacramento and 
Webster streets, San Francisco (telephone 
West 3046). About prospective pupils in 
other localities, write direct to the State 
Library, Sacramento. 



318 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



SUTRO BRANCH. 

Mrs Latjka Stefeens Suggett, in 
charge. 

The Sutro Branch occupies the top floor 
of the Lane Medical Library Building, 
Sacramento and Webster streets, San 
Francisco, and is open every day except 
Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

See page 290. 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 
SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Miss Esther M. Bomgardner, San Diego. 

Cal. 

'15. Asst. Public School L., Los Angeles 
Miss Thelma Brackett, San Diego, Cal. 

'20. Ln. Siskiyou Co. F. L., Treka. 
Miss Helen V. Briggs, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Agnes E. Brown, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'15. Asst. Washington State College Li- 
brary, Pullman, Wash. 
Miss Helen M. Bruner, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Lucile Huff Buchan, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Mrs Virginia Clowe Bullis, Woodland, Cal. 

'17. Out of library work. 
Miss Ruth E. Bullock, Redlands, Cal. 

'15. Asst. P. L., Redlands. 
Miss Elta L. Camper, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. Univ. of Cal. L., Berkeley. 
Miss Blanche Chalfant, Bishop, Cal. 

'14. Ln. Butte Co. P. L., Oroville. 
Miss Marguerite "Chatfield, Pasadena, Cal. 

'20. Asst. Siskiyou Co. P. L., Yreka. 
Miss Nellie E. Christensen, Selma, Cal. 

19. Asst. Fresno Co. F. L., Fresno. 
Miss Mabel Coulter, Salinas, Cal. 

'14. Asst. Contra Costa Co. F. L., Mar- 
tinez. 
Miss Helen Esther Crawford, Winters, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Miss Dorotha Davis, Los Angeles, Cal. 

'17. Ln. Fresno High School L., Fresno. 
Miss Tillie de Bernardi, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

'IS. Out of library work. 
Miss Estella De Ford, National City, Cal. 

'15. Ln. Napa Co. F. L., Napa. 
Miss Margaret Dennison, Alameda, Cal. 

'17. Out of library work. 
Miss Abbie Doughty, San Luis Obispo, Cal. 

'20. Teacher-Ln. Bonita Union High 
School, La Verne. 
Miss Ellen B. Frink, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'19. Asst. Monterey Co. F. L., Salinas. 
Miss Flo A. Gantz, Pomona, Cal. 

'20. Ln. San Luis Obispo Co. F. L., 
San Luis Obispo. 
Miss Beatrice Y. Gawne, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Ln. Salinas Union High School L., 
Salinas. 
Miss Hazel G. Gibson, Santa Monica, Cal. 

'19. Asst. Sacramento Co. F. L., Sac- 
ramento. 
Miss Margaret V. Girdner, Sacramento. 

'17. Ln. Palo Alto High School L., Palo 
Alto. 
Miss Mary E. Glock, Madera, Cal. 

'15. Died, March 6, 1922. 
Miss Bernice L. Goff, San Jose, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Mrs Jennie Rumsey Gould, Woodland, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 



Mrs Mildred Kellogg Hargis, Salinas, Cal. 

'IS. Out of library work. 
Mrs Louise Jamme Harriss, Hood River, 
Oregon. 
'15. Out of library work. 
Miss Margaret Hatch, Santa Rosa, Cal. 
'15. Ln. Standard Oil Co. L., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Miss Frances Haub, Sacramento, Cal. 

'20. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Bessie B. Heath, Michigan Bar, CaL 

'19. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Hazel Meddaugh Heffner, Stockton, 
Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Cecilia Henderson, Santa Paula, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss Edna S. Holroyd, Hanford, Cal. 
'15. Ln. San Mateo Co. F. L., Redwood 
City. 
Mrs Helen Hopwood Judd, Palo Alto, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Miss Helen Katherine Kellogg, Salinas, 
Cal 
'19. With Nichols Publishing Co., New 
York City. 
Mrs Winona McConnell Kennedy, Elk 
Grove, Cal. 
'15. Out of library work. 
Mrs Algeline Marlow Lawson, San Diego, 
Cal. 
'18. Asst. P. L., San Diego. 
Miss Marjorie C. Learned, Pasadena, Cal. 

'20. Out of library work. 
Miss Amy G. Luke, Willows, Cal. 

'15. Out of library work. 
Miss Everett I. McCullough, Berkeley, Cal. 

'19. Asst. Newberry L., Chicago, 111. 
Miss N. Ruth McCullough, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Ruth Beard McDowell, Modesto, Cal. 

'14. Out of library work. 
Miss M. Ruth McLaughlin, Lamanda Park, 
Cal 
'17. Asst. Sutro Branch, State L., San 
Francisco. 
Miss Anne Margrave, Santa Barbara, Cal. 

'14. Ln. Inyo Co. F. L., Independence. 
Miss Lenala Martin, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Ln. Lassen Co. F. L., Susanville. 
Miss Vera V. Mitchell, Oakland. Cal. 
'19. Ln. Piedmont High School U, 
Piedmont. 
Miss Marion Morse, Berkeley, Cal. 

'17. Ln. Maui Co. F. L., Wailuku, T. H. 
Mrs Alice Moore Patton, Los Gatos, Cal. 

'18. Out of library work. • 
Mrs Marion Schumacher Percival, Han- 
ford, Cal. 
'15. Out of library work. 
Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, Modesto, Cal. 
'14 Ln. Beale Memorial L., Bakers- 
field. 
Miss Margaret L. Potter, Oakland, Cal. 
'16. Asst. Mechanics' Mercantile Li- 
brary, San Francisco. 
Mrs Eunice Steele Price, Berkeley, Cal. 

'16. Out of library work. 
Mrs Beatrice Brasefleld Rakestraw, Palo 
Alto. Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Esther L. Ramont, Modesto, Cal. 
'20. Ln. Modesto High School L., 
Modesto. 
Miss Anna Belle Robinson, Claremont, Cal. 

'18. Died, June 22, 1920. 
Miss Myrtle Ruhl, Redwood City, Cal. 
'14. Head of Order Dept., State L., 
Sacramento. 
Miss Marguerite C. Ryan, San Jose, Cal. 
'19. Out of library work. 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



319 



Miss Georgia Pearl Seeker, Fresno, Cal. 
'19. Asst. Stanford Univ. L., Stanford 
Univ. 
Miss Ruth Seymour, Mill Valley, Cal. 
'IS. Ln. Tamalpais Union High School 
L., Mill Valley. 
Miss Blanche L. Shadle, Lodi, Cal. 

'17. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Mrs Edith Edenborg Smalley, Muroc, Cal. 

'18. Out of library work. 
Mrs Edna Bell Smith, Fairoaks, Cal. 

'17. Out of library work. 
Mrs Elizabeth Snyder Smith, Berkeley, 
Cal. 
'20. Out of library work. 
Mrs Vivian Gregory Smith, "Woodland, Cal. 
'14. Ln. Security Trust and Savings 
Bank, Los Angeles. 
Mrs Rosamond Bradbury Waithman, Santa 
Barbara, Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 
Miss Caroline Wenzel, Sacramento, Cal. 

'14. Asst. State L., Sacramento. 
Miss Josephine L. Whitbeck, Richmond, 
Cal. 
'16. Asst. P. L., Sacramento. 
Miss Essie T. White, Broderick, Cal. 

'19. Out of library work. 
Mrs Katharine Cahoon Wilson, Berkeley, 

'17. Out of library work. 
Miss Aldine Winham, Salinas, Cal. 

'20. Ln. State Teachers College L., 
Santa Barbara. 
Mrs Dorothy Clarke Worden, Sacramento, 
Cal. 
'15. Ln. Colusa Co. F. L., Colusa. 
Mrs Bess Ranton Yates, Long Beach, Cal. 
'18. Out of library work. 

News Items. 

Miss Katharine Cahoon, '17, returned 
in the spring from Hilo, T. H., where she 
had been children's librarian in the county 
library there. In Los Angeles July 1 she 
was married to Mr Lloyd Richards Wil- 
son. They will make their home in Berke- 
ley. 

Miss Blanche Chalfant, '14, was ap- 
pointed librarian of the Butte County Free 
Library at Oroville, April 6. 

Miss Marguerite Chatfield, '20, has gone 
to Yreka to be in charge of the school 
department of the Siskiyou County Free 
Library. 

Miss Abbie Doughty, '20, is listing the 
old Spanish and Latin material at the 
Sutro Branch of the State Library during 
July and August. 

Miss Ellen B. Frink, '19, is in charge of 
the Monterey County Free Library for a 
couple of months while Miss Hadden is on 
a trip East. 

Mrs Miriam Colcord Post, '14, became 
librarian of the Beale Memorial Public 
Library at Bakersfield, May 1. 



RECENT ACCESSIONS. 

Additions to the Library During April, 
May and June, 1922. 

The last number of the Quarterly Bul- 
letin of the California State Library 
which was issued was no. 4 of vol. 4, 
covering the accessions for September- 
December, 190.J. The Bulletin has been 
discontinued and the matter contained in 
it is now appearing in News Notes of 
California Libraries. 

The last list of recent accessions ap- 
peared in the April, 1922, issue of this 
publication. 



GENERAL WORKS. 

Boyden, William Llewellyn. 

Bibliography of the writings of Albert 
Pike. 1921. 012 P63 

British science guild. 

A catalogue of British scientific and 
technical books, covering every 
branch of science and technology 
carefully classified and indexed. 
1921. r016.5 B86 

Brown, Zaidee Mabel. 

Directions for the librarian of a small 
library. 1921. x025 B88a 

Conkling, Grace Walcott (Hazard). 
Imagination and children's reading. 
1921. 028 C75 

Danielson, Henry. 

Bibliographies of modern authors. 

1921. 016.82 D18 

Contents : Max Beerbohm. — Rupert 
Brooke. — Hubert Crackanthorpe. — 
Walter De La Mare. — John Drink- 
water. — Lord Dunsany. — James Elroy 
Flecker. — George Gissing. — Francis 
Ledwidge. — Compton Mackenzie. — 
John Masefield. — Leonard Merrick. — 
Richard Middleton. — Arthur Symons. 
■ — Hugh Walpole. 

Miller, Zana Kate. 

County library records. 1922. 

qx025 M6 

Reprinted from January 1922, issue 
of Public libraries. 

Gift of Library bureau. 

Mills, William Haslam. 

The Manchester guardian ; a century 
of history. 1921. 072 M65 



320 



NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [July, 1922 



Overton, Jacqueline Marion. 

A list of books for girls and boys, 
suggested for purchase by Marion 
Cutter of the Children's book shop. 

028 096 
Wilson, H. W., firm publishers. 

Children's catalog supplement : a guide 
to the best reading for boys and 
girls. 1921. (Standard catalog 
series.) qr028 W7a3 

OCCULTISM. 
Haetmann, Franz. 

Magic, white and black. 1914. 

133 H33 

[Oliver, Frederick S.]. 

A dweller on two planets ; or, The 

dividing of the way, by Phylos, the 

Thibetan. 1920. c133 048 

Stead, William Thomas. 

Real ghost stories, collected and edited. 
New ed., re-arranged and introduced 
by Estelle W. Stead. 1921. 

133 S79 
Whitehead, Willis F. 

Occultism simplified ; or, The mystic 
thesaurus. 1921. 133 W59 

SPIRITUALISM. 

Glenconner, Pamela Genevieve Adelaide 
(Wyndham) Tennant, baroness. 
The earthern vessel ; a volume dealing 
with spirit-communication received 
in the form of book-texts. 1921. 

133.9 G55 
I'aton, Lewis Bayles. 

Spiritism and the cult of the dead in 
antiquity. 1921. 133.9 P31 

AVatson, Albert Durrant. 

Birth through death, the ethics of the 
twentieth plane. 1920. 133.9 W33b 

CHILD STUDY. 

Niemeyer, Nannie. 

Children and childhood. 1921. 

136.7 N67 
Stockton, James Leroy. 

The definition of intelligence in rela- 
tion to modern methods of mental 
measurement. [1921] (Psycho- 

logical review publications. Psy- 
chological monographs.) q 136.7 S8 



PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS. 

Appel, Joseph Herbert. 

The making of a man ; letters from a 
father to his son at school. 1921. 
170 A64 
[Atkinson, William Walker.] 

Hatha Yoga ; or, The Yogi philosophy 
of physical well-being, with numer- 
ous exercises, by Yogi Ramacharaka 
[pseud.]. 181 A87 

Ellis, Havelock. 

Little essays of love and virtue. 
cl922. 176 E47 

field, Guy Cromwell. 

Moral theory ; an introduction to 
ethics. [1921] 170 F45 

[Hamilton, George Rostrevor.] 

Bergson and future philosophy ; an 

essay on the scope of intelligence, 

by George Rostrevor [pseud.]. 1921. 

194 B49zh 

Joad, Cyril Edwin Mitchinson. 

Common-sense ethics. [1921] 170 J 62 

Keith, Arthur Berriedale. 

The Karma-Mimamsa. 1921. (The 
Heritage of India series.) 

181 K28k 
Laird, John. 

A study in realism. 1920. 149 Lib 

Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm. 

The Nietzsche-Wagner correspondence. 
cl921. (Intimate letters series.) 

193 N67zfo1 
Redgrove, Herbert Stanley. 

Purpose and transcendentalism. 1920. 

141 R31 
Thomas, Evan Edward. 

Lotze's theory of reality. 1921. 

193 L88zt 
Watkin, Edward Ingram. 

The philosophy of mysticism. 1920. 

149.3 W33 

DISARMAMENT. 

American federation of labor. 

Disarmament. 1921. 172.4 A51f 

Gift of American Federation of 
Labor. 

Herron, George Davis. 

The defeat in the victory. [1921] 

172.4 H56 
Palmer, Frederick. 

The folly of nations. 1921. 172.4 P17 



vol. 17, no. 3] 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 



32] 



Reely, Mary Katharine, comp. 

Selected articles on disarmament. 
1921. (The handbook series.) 

172.4 R32d 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

Bentley, Isaac Madison, cd. 

Critical and experimental studies in 
psychology from the University of 
Illinois. [1921 J (Psychological 
review publications. Psychological 
monographs, vol. 30.) q150 B4 

Blackford, Mrs Katherine M. (Hunt- 
singer). 
Reading character at sight. Arthur 
Xewcomb ed. 191S. 7 v. in 1. 

150 B62r 
Freud, Sigmund. 

Dream psychology ; authorized English 
translation by M. D. Bder. 1920. 

135 F88dr 
Fuller, Sir Bampfylde. 

The science of ourselves (a sequel to 
the 'Descent of man'). 1921. (Ox- 
ford medical publications.) 150 F96 

Robinson, James Harvey. 

The mind in the making ; the relation 
of intelligence to social reform. 
cl921. 150 R66 

Russell, Hon Bertrand Arthur Wil- 
liam. 
The analysis of mind. 1921. (Library 
of philosophy.) 150 R96 

mith, Stevenson & Guthrie, Edwin 

Ray. 
General psychology in terms of 
behavior. 1921. 150 S66 

Woodw